Vicki Hinze's Blog, page 3

April 16, 2016

Lofty Ideals, Living in Color, Vicki Hinze, Social In Global Network


Lofty Ideals:  Living in Color
By
Vicki Hinze
  
We might at times choose to ignore right from wrong but we do know it. Even those with absent or MIA parents eventually expand the circle of people with whom they interact and learn quickly what is and isn’t deemed right and good.  And even those who choose to ignore right from wrong do so knowing that they’re doing so.

People might not be honest about this with others—and at times they aren’t honest with themselves—but that’s mostly for convenience and not because they don’t see the difference.  Very few truly do not see the difference. That group bears the tag psychotic for their inability to distinguish right from wrong. They don’t choose not to do it, or not want to do it, they can’t do it.  There’s a big difference in inability and choosing to deny something because it isn’t convenient.

When we determine that something is right or wrong, we have to make a choice.  Do we do the right thing because it is the right thing?  Or do we do the wrong thing (often because we want to) and live with the consequences? Namely, a guilty conscience, being held accountable, or being held responsible.

Frankly, our decisions go either way—and they tend to change over time. Let’s say we (or our character) chooses the wrong thing knowing it’s wrong. In his own mind, he will rationalize or attempt to substantiate why he has no choice, why he must do this wrong thing. He’ll move heaven and earth to convince himself and others that wrong is right—deluding himself—or that while he’s doing the wrong thing, he’s doing it for the right reasons.

The fallout isn’t bad. The consequences aren’t steep. And so he feels justified in doing this wrong thing—which makes it easier to convince himself that the next wrong thing is justifiable, too.

Years later, he might or might not recall the initial incident as wrong at all.  He might only recall the rationalized version of doing what he had to do for lofty ideals or even noble goals.

Will he escape unscathed?  No. It appears some do, but no one ever does. At some time, if only to himself, he’ll have to deal with that wrong as a wrong.

My point is that all people have emotional and spiritual dilemmas, and all wrestle with right or wrong.  Perspectives, while different for different people in different situations, do share commonalities that are relatable and enduring. (i.e. Murder is wrong.) But when you craft the motivation for murder (i.e. self-defense, to protect the life of another) the circumstances influence the perception of the crime. What seemed indefensible is defensible, and while it might still be deemed wrong it is understandable and others easily relate. They see themselves in that position and question what they would do.

We should have lofty ideals and inspire the worst in us to reflect the best in us. To elevate our standards and self-expectations. We should strive to be better and do better. We see the value in ideals. These are the hallmarks of a civil society (versus one in chaos).

But we need to understand too that lofty ideals and high standards are tested. Sometimes we all succeed at meeting our own expectations, and sometimes we don’t. We all fall short, often when we least want to fall short.

That’s part of being human. It’s also rooted in conflict and motivations. It isn’t that we don’t know the difference between right and wrong, we do.  It’s that we find doing right inconvenient at odds with what we want. And so we twist things around in our minds until we get the results we want that give us emotional cover to do what we want to do.

It’s flawed to the core, of course. And those flaws result in more conflicts and additional obstacles. Conflicts and obstacles are healthy for fiction. But in real life, they cause far more complications than we realize.  There are anticipated and intended consequences, and unexpected and unintended consequences, and for those we generally pay the highest price.

The thing is that lofty ideals have merit. And—this is the key point of this article—people are quick to state them and that they wouldn’t veer from them in a given situation. And they truly believe that. But a more accurate truth is that we really don’t know how we’d react when our ideals or values are tested until they are tested. Then we can say with authority what we would do because it is what we did. Until tested, we are looking at a situation through a perspective lens and defining the way we hope we would react. Our actual reaction might be far different—and for compelling reasons.

So when crafting characters—or a life—be slow to judge others for their reactions that seemingly violate your ideals. Look beyond the act to the rationale for it. The motivation. Because no life is simply created in black and white. Every life is influenced by an array of colors—a virtual rainbow of colors. We live in that rainbow—and every one of us who live have lives littered with shades of gray.


 


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© 2016, Vicki Hinze. Vicki Hinze, The Marked Star PreviewVicki Hinze is the award-winning bestselling author of nearly thirty novels in a variety of genres including, suspense, mystery, thriller, and romantic or faith-affirming thrillers. Her latest releases are: The Marked Star and In Case of Emergency: What You Need to Know When I Can’t Tell You (nonfiction). She holds a MFA in Creative Writing and a Ph.D. in Philosophy, Theocentric Business and Ethics. Hinze’s website: www.vickihinze.com. Facebook. Books. Twitter. Contact. KNOW IT FIRST! Subscribe to Vicki’s Monthly Newsletter!

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Published on April 16, 2016 00:33 • 3 views

April 15, 2016

OWWritingAgenda


 


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© 2016, Vicki Hinze. Vicki Hinze, The Marked Star PreviewVicki Hinze is the award-winning bestselling author of nearly thirty novels in a variety of genres including, suspense, mystery, thriller, and romantic or faith-affirming thrillers. Her latest releases are: The Marked Star and In Case of Emergency: What You Need to Know When I Can’t Tell You (nonfiction). She holds a MFA in Creative Writing and a Ph.D. in Philosophy, Theocentric Business and Ethics. Hinze’s website: www.vickihinze.com. Facebook. Books. Twitter. Contact. KNOW IT FIRST! Subscribe to Vicki’s Monthly Newsletter!


 

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Published on April 15, 2016 00:21 • 3 views

April 12, 2016

The Weary Season, vicki Hinze


The Weary Season
 
By
 
Vicki Hinze
 
 
We have the seasons—Summer, Winter, Fall and Spring—but we have other kinds of seasons, too.  Ones that are joyful and ones that sorrowful. Ones that try our souls (and sanity) and ones that send our souls soaring.

Still, we have other seasons that are harder to define in a single word.  The one I want to focus on today is the Weary Season.

Oh, there are others. Times when we teach, learn, are tested for some larger purpose so we’re prepared and protected for future trials. But the weary season has sharp focus now. It is one less defined because it isn’t just a weariness of the body, but of the mind and body and spirit. It’s as if everything conspires to knock us to our knees and keep us there for the duration.

We’ve all experienced times in our lives where we’ve felt beaten down and just so tired of being sick and tired that we’re depleted and we can’t seem to muster the crumbs of ourselves to pull ourselves up and out of the abyss.  What’s the abyss?

I’m heartened and dismayed at the question. If you’ve never been there, you may be confident that at some time you will be. If you’ve ever been there, you know that dark and lonely, hellish place too well and hate it with a passion and never want to go back.  The abyss reflects everything wrong, bad, going poorly, and offers no hope of any change so that anything can or will get better.  It sees no light at the end of the tunnel. It sees only darkness and misery.  It is, the absence of hope. The death of dreams. The assassination of inspiration. It is being so lost and so empty you can’t begin to believe that you ever again will know anything good or even marginally not good.

Understand, the weary season isn’t depression. It’s beyond depression. With depression one can reason that nothing good lasts forever, but nothing bad can either. With the weary season, there is no good. Only bad and, overwhelmed by it, you can’t begin to see anything beyond it.

When we encounter troubles or trials, we typically have another area of our lives where we take refuge. For example, life at work isn’t good, so we endure and struggle through, but at the end of the day, we go home and life is better there. We heal at home. And when troubles are at home, we heal at work. Or with friends. Or at church. Or with a group where we share common interests.  There is someplace or some area in our lives where we find respite, and we can feel joy and laugh, or at least see beyond misery. This helps renew us and gives us the strength and fortitude to continue to cope with the challenges so that when we return to them, we can approach solutions to them from a more balanced place.

But during the weary season, there are troubles at every turn—at home, at work, in our groups, with our friends, and often with our health. Because our mindset and emotions take heavy tolls on our health, and when our health is diminished so too is our mindset, the combination makes our ability to cope with everything else harder.

So we’re in this weary season and we feel bad, nothing’s going right, and we slide down the slope into the abyss. It’s dark and empty and we hate it, but we have no idea how to get out of it. What do we do?

Some seek the advice of family or friends, coworkers or group members—people we trust who might be able to help.  Some seek professional assistance, and the value of that shouldn’t be diminished. And some seek treatment for the symptoms, believing that what’s happening is self-inflicted or inflicted by others.

Often, though, the reason for the weary season isn’t the result of others’ actions or even our own. Sometimes it’s simply that stuff happens, it impacts us, and that nudges or slams us down the slope.

One thing happens, then another and those two set off a third. With each something, we feel more and more overwhelmed. And then starts the mental frenzy of every insecurity we’ve ever had playing hardball to kick us a little harder, because it’s never easier to impact our minds or emotions than when we’re already engaged in battles.

It’s only with the clarity of hindsight that we see good came from the trials or troubles. We need time and space to see it, but eventually, we do. We gained new insight, a new skill, learned something new about ourselves.. We found out that we are stronger than we thought we were and we can keep pushing to get through tough times.

I have a little sign on my desktop. It reads:  All is well with my soul.    Now why, you ask, is that significant?  Because that’s where the healing begins.

How we view our troubles determines how we face or approach or attack them.  What kind of solutions we seek. How we implement those solutions when we’re weary to bone or depleted.  If we’re settled at soul level, then our mindset changes. It’s not hopeless or destructive. It’s hopeful. Constructive. We sense that return of hope and it drives our emotions.  Anyone who has ever faced a problem feeling hopeless understands the value of feeling hopeful.

The problem is still the problem, but how we perceive it and address it is very different. That makes it certain the outcome too will be different. And that makes getting right at soul level critical to mustering the crumbled resources we have left—there are always crumbs—and shaping them into some tool that aids us in crawling out of the abyss.

If all is well with the soul, it helps repair the mind, the emotions, and then all three—spirit, mind and body—work in concert to heal the body.

Look, I’m not going to sit here and tell you that you can pull yourself up out of anything. That reading words on a card on your desktop will restore you. Or that it won’t be hard to get out of the abyss.  I will tell you that to heal, you must want to heal. You must believe healing is possible. And you must be willing to do the work required to heal.

Have you ever had surgery?  If so, you know getting up and walking is key to getting well. Moving builds strength, appetite, endurance. And you need all three to restore yourself.  The first time you try to get up, it hurts. It’s slow. It’s hard. It’s such a struggle you’re apt to break into a cold sweat at just rolling over and sitting up on the side of the bed. But you do it. Then next time, you put your feet on the floor, and stand. You might get dizzy, see spots before your eyes. Your mouth might go dry and you might want to cry or scream because you’re in pain. But you do it.

The next day, you roll a little easier, sit up a little faster, stand up with cringes but not shooting pains. And you walk. Maybe to the door of the hospital room, or down the hall. You fear you’re so tired you might not make it back to your hospital bed. But you do. And each time you force yourself—force yourself—to get up and move, you’re a tiny bit less sore, a tiny bit less dizzy, see a few less spots—and you walk just a little further.

That’s how you get out of the abyss.  You work at it. You resolve yourself to the discomfort, knowing that if you persist, the season of pain and challenges will weaken and you will grow stronger.

Life beats up on us all.  Sometimes we bring about the challenges we must face, but sometimes they are out of our control.  That doesn’t mean we endure them and suffer through them for nothing. No, it means that we’re adding a layer of resolve and determination to our foundation. Digging our personal well of assets, tools, and coping skills a little deeper, so when we need to dig deeper, we have them, we have those added tools in our store house.

Some say the weary season is a merciless season. But I think if you endure one, if not when in it, on the other side of it, you see that it is merciful.  Not fun. Not enjoyable or pleasant. But merciful in that you gain needed preparation to assist you in future or to prevent you from making a mistake that as a direct or relatable result of what you’ve learned to avoid that mistake, you will recognize in time to protect yourself. My mother used to call these things “small mercies.” Granted, they didn’t feel small at the time, but the benefits they provided were often huge, so I guess that balanced things out.

We all know that it is when we’re weary and trouble is pounding us from all sides that our mettle is tested. It’s then when we discover our character. What we can endure and remain upright. It’s not when things are running along great and we’re gliding through life.  That we have those gliding seasons well might be a reward for enduring the weary seasons. Or maybe they’re rest areas on our life’s journey. The place we gather and process what we’ve gained and best come to know ourselves.

I know the weary season tries the soul. I also know if all is well with the soul, then all can be made well and whole. And there is a peace in knowing it. Because just like with the post-surgery walking and gaining strength, with each weary season we encounter, we gain emotional and spiritual strength. And wisdom. And hope. Because we know that weary seasons, like all seasons, come and go. And this one too shall pass.



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© 2016, Vicki Hinze. Vicki Hinze, The Marked Star PreviewVicki Hinze is the award-winning bestselling author of nearly thirty novels in a variety of genres including, suspense, mystery, thriller, and romantic or faith-affirming thrillers. Her latest releases are: The Marked Star and In Case of Emergency: What You Need to Know When I Can’t Tell You (nonfiction). She holds a MFA in Creative Writing and a Ph.D. in Philosophy, Theocentric Business and Ethics. Hinze’s website: www.vickihinze.com. Facebook. Books. Twitter. Contact. KNOW IT FIRST! Subscribe to Vicki’s Monthly Newsletter!


 


 


 


 


 

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Published on April 12, 2016 00:16 • 3 views

April 7, 2016


Social in Books logo 2016


Vicki Hinze, The Marked Star, Shadow Watchers


Amazon


 


PEOPLE ARE NOT WHAT THEY SEEM


Superstar Elle Bostwick is kidnapped in London. But who has kidnapped her? NINA, a group of powerful and ruthless opportunists who will do anything to anyone to gain access to something Elle has that they want? Or the CIA, who is equally determined to prevent NINA access to what it wants? And why a singer? Why Elle? And why does she not know what they’re after?


Days later, Elle mysteriously turns up at a Shadow Watcher’s wedding reception, and the Shadow Watchers, Nick Sloan specifically, is ordered to keep her safe—indefinitely. But the top secret entity issuing the orders doesn’t say why or who is pursuing Elle. All information is being atypically withheld. That has never before happened. Why now?


OLD WOUNDS RUN DEEP


Nick and Elle have a history. He left her without even saying good-bye, determined to never need or want anyone—not after surviving his horror show of a family. Nick learned the hard way to never dare to love anyone. He didn’t know Elle had been walking wounded, too.


Now she’s burst back into his life–with baggage that could get them and the other Shadow Watchers killed. Who is on their side? Who is their real enemy? And what does that enemy really want? Most importantly, will they find out before they end up dead.


CAN LOVE HEAL THEM—IS IT ENOUGH?


Nick willingly risks his life for her, but does he dare to risk his heart? Does Elle? Both have little reason to trust. Little reason to dare, except for the hope of love they find in each other. But neither is certain… Is love enough to heal deep wounds? To spare the lives and hearts of Nick and The Marked Star?


 


The Shadow Watchers were introduced in Crossroads Crisis Center series:


 


Book 1: Forget Me Not (Ben)


Book 2: Deadly Ties (Mark)


Book 3: Not This Time (Joe)


 


And continue in their own Shadow Watchers series:


 


Book 1: The Marked Bride (Tim)


Book 2:  The Marked Star (Nick)


 


Coming Soon:


Book 3: The Marked Target (Sam)


 


| Amazon |


Social in Books logo 2016

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Published on April 07, 2016 07:12 • 3 views

April 6, 2016

OW-Believe-in-Your-Story


 


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© 2016, Vicki Hinze. Vicki Hinze, The Marked Star PreviewVicki Hinze is the award-winning bestselling author of nearly thirty novels in a variety of genres including, suspense, mystery, thriller, and romantic or faith-affirming thrillers. Her latest releases are: The Marked Star and In Case of Emergency: What You Need to Know When I Can’t Tell You (nonfiction). She holds a MFA in Creative Writing and a Ph.D. in Philosophy, Theocentric Business and Ethics. Hinze’s website: www.vickihinze.com. Facebook. Books. Twitter. Contact. KNOW IT FIRST! Subscribe to Vicki’s Monthly Newsletter!


 

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Published on April 06, 2016 00:26 • 2 views

MFZ-Messed-Up



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© 2016, Vicki Hinze. Vicki Hinze, The Marked Star PreviewVicki Hinze is the award-winning bestselling author of nearly thirty novels in a variety of genres including, suspense, mystery, thriller, and romantic or faith-affirming thrillers. Her latest releases are: The Marked Star and In Case of Emergency: What You Need to Know When I Can’t Tell You (nonfiction). She holds a MFA in Creative Writing and a Ph.D. in Philosophy, Theocentric Business and Ethics. Hinze’s website: www.vickihinze.com. Facebook. Books. Twitter. Contact. KNOW IT FIRST! Subscribe to Vicki’s Monthly Newsletter!


 

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Published on April 06, 2016 00:13 • 2 views

April 4, 2016

Vicki Hinze, feeling lost, taking the scenic tour, life is the journey



I woke up this morning with the words in the graphic above on my mind so I thought it was a good time for a nudge to recall that life is in the journey.  There are going to be hills and valleys, wrong turns, road construction and detours. And we’re going to have to cope with all those things and a lot more. That’s just life, and it is a journey.
Over the years, we moved a lot, which meant we had to get used to new places, and finding our way around. That made for a lot of getting lost. I didn’t like the negative feelings associated with being lost. As if you didn’t belong. Were an intruder. So two things happened:


 We didn’t say we were lost, we said we were taking the scenic tour.  That simple change of mindset changed the way we all responded. The kids noted things, I noted things. New places to visit, where things were, and what was there. Missing a turn became an adventure, kind of like being in a boat on a winding river and feeling eager instead of anxious at seeing what’s beyond the next bend. That was exciting, which brings about a whole different set of emotional reactions to the new place. A good, positive, and fun reaction.


Now and then we’d deem a day a “Lost Day.”  That sounds bad on the surface, but it was a wonderful day.  We piled into the car, and wherever we wound up, that’s where we explored. We embraced getting lost, being totally open to whatever came and wherever we ended up. Sometimes it might be an amusement park, sometimes a museum. The beach, the woods, even caves or gardens or the zoo. You just never knew where a Lost Day would lead you.


Lost takes on a whole different perspective then.
If you’re feeling lost, try making that mental shift so that you see yourself on a scenic tour. Something of interest, and of benefit, will turn up and you’ll find some merit in the diversion. You’ll also be less stressed or tense and even more serene. When serene, you are far more apt to enjoy the journey of your life.
Blessings,
Vicki

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Published on April 04, 2016 05:11 • 3 views

April 3, 2016

TA-How-to-Rise


 


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© 2016, Vicki Hinze. Vicki Hinze, The Marked Star PreviewVicki Hinze is the award-winning bestselling author of nearly thirty novels in a variety of genres including, suspense, mystery, thriller, and romantic or faith-affirming thrillers. Her latest releases are: The Marked Star and In Case of Emergency: What You Need to Know When I Can’t Tell You (nonfiction). She holds a MFA in Creative Writing and a Ph.D. in Philosophy, Theocentric Business and Ethics. Hinze’s website: www.vickihinze.com. Facebook. Books. Twitter. Contact. KNOW IT FIRST! Subscribe to Vicki’s Monthly Newsletter!


 

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Published on April 03, 2016 23:58 • 3 views

April 1, 2016

On Writing, Vicki Hinze


vicki hinze, newsletter and free book


 


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© 2016, Vicki Hinze. Vicki Hinze, The Marked Star PreviewVicki Hinze is the award-winning bestselling author of nearly thirty novels in a variety of genres including, suspense, mystery, thriller, and romantic or faith-affirming thrillers. Her latest releases are: The Marked Star and In Case of Emergency: What You Need to Know When I Can’t Tell You (nonfiction). She holds a MFA in Creative Writing and a Ph.D. in Philosophy, Theocentric Business and Ethics. Hinze’s website: www.vickihinze.com. Facebook. Books. Twitter. Contact. KNOW IT FIRST! Subscribe to Vicki’s Monthly Newsletter!


 

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Published on April 01, 2016 00:13 • 3 views

March 31, 2016

Vicki Hinze, Reflection and Social Media Engagement
Reflection and Social Media Engagement
By
Vicki Hinze
Note: Social-In Global Network column being added to the Library…

In these days of intense social media, texting and email, one would expect to feel more connected than ever. And yet what we find is people are feeling distant and alienated, and more alone than ever. I hear it all the time and call these silent screams.

 


We drive ourselves crazy, give up doing things we’d love to do because we feel we ought to be doing more to connect.  Only the harder we try, the more alone we feel. Getting and holding anyone’s attention these days is growing more and more difficult—even when you expend a great deal of effort to give or do something for them and not take from them.

 


Part of the reason is the vast number of connections possible.  In earlier days, we connected by phone—but not too often because long-distance calls were expensive.  We connected via snail mail, but only now and then because writing a letter took a lot more effort than whipping off an email and we had to pay for the stamps and actually go mail the letter.  We made time to talk to neighbors over the fence, in coffee klatches, at office water-coolers, or over lunches. That was a large part of our daily life social engagement.  Most had a core group of friends—a small number of maybe four or fewer—and we kept in touch and shared things on a regular basis.  When things went right or wrong, it was with this core group that we shared and celebrated or commiserated.

 


Today, the core group for many has fallen to online social media engagement. It’s replaced the small gatherings, the lunches, the phone calls, the live and in person socializing.  Lunch hours are spent not with friends but checking email, texting, or on social media accounts. If we have something to celebrate or mourn, we don’t visit or call and meet up with friends, we post it to the world on Facebook or another social media outlet.

 


I’m not saying the changes in the way we interact are good or bad only different. But honesty forces me to add that many are overdosing on sensory input and it is no wonder we see more people feeling lonely and alone. They are.  When we cease to forge or nurture friendships, they fade. Relationships are like anything else neglected.

 


Our social media engagements might be fun. We might enjoy them. We might make wonderful online friends who give us a moment to share something good or bad or just to voice an opinion. But those relationships cannot replace the ones forged in being there through thick and thin and making time in a time-crunched schedule to have or be a friend.

 


Real people need to personally interact with real people.

 


I got a note from a woman I’ve known online for years. Recently, a significant event occurred in her life. She has thousands and thousands of online friends, but less than a dozen noted this significant event. It wasn’t a small thing, but what happened is indicative of the nature of online relationships.  If more had seen news of the event, had known about it, then more would have wished her well. But they were busy doing their own things and didn’t notice her event in their time-lines, or her event didn’t appear in their time-lines. That’s a frequent occurrence now that happens all the time.

 


She was genuinely upset by this measly response from her online friends. The absence of notice made her feel insignificant, and that’s always a sad thing.  A sleight, real or imagined, creates pain, and the pain is real. That said, she shouldn’t have been hurt and I expect it would mortify her online friends to know she was hurt. The lack of notice wasn’t intentional, it was and is the nature of the beast. No one can foster close relationships with thousands or keep up with what’s going on with thousands. And yet she was hurt and sad. Her feelings were her feelings. Valid.

 


And therein lies the reason for this post.  A warning to us all to strive for balance in our lives. We should participate in our online forums and enjoy our online friends. But we shouldn’t exclude our in-person friends from our lives. Those relationships too are important to us and they too need nurturing.

 


That was my takeaway from this note.  That and to make time to have in-person friends and to be a friend in-person and online. To give friends and people present in our lives our time and attention. To put down the phone, let the text wait, do the email later. When we’re lucky enough to be face-to-face with a friend, we should give them our full attention—and we should have theirs. That’s common courtesy and how friends treat friends.

 


A few years ago, one of the best friends in my life died. She was a wonderful woman. We had “Lost Days” together. We’d get in the car and just go, and wherever we wound up, we’d find something fun to do there.  We laughed a lot. We cried a lot, too.  We endured husbands who spent a lot of time away from home, raised kids going through growing pains and challenges all kids go through and all parents worry over. We were close and we shared just about everything. When my dad died, she listened, and we worked through the grief together. When her dad died, I listened, and we worked through the grief together. Good or bad, we were there for each other—day or night, through thick and thin and joy and sorrow.

 


Bonds like those take time and effort on all parts to create. But they are priceless.  I think of her and a hundred memories race through my mind. Maybe you have someone like that in your life.  If so, understand the gift of it being what it is.  If you don’t have someone in your life like that, I hope you will.  I’ll tell you this.  She’s been gone for five years now and I would trade all social media engagement for the rest of my life for five more minutes with my friend. Just five minutes.  And I’d consider that a great deal for me; a blessing I’d treasure forever.

 


Reflection on anything sometimes helps us see clearly. Sometimes what we see, we regret. But sometimes we see things we hadn’t seen before, and we come to understand what most matters.

 


As I told the sad woman, people need to interact with people. We don’t always want to interact, it is often inconvenient to interact, but we need to interact. Online or in person, one person can change the way we feel about people in general and about ourselves. And knowing we’re important to that one other person proves to us we’re more significant than we often realize.

 


For that reason—to let others know they are significant and to remember that we are, too—we should all engage in reflection and really think about what we devote to and sacrifice to and for social media.  The truth is, balance is best because we honestly need both, and it’s highly likely that both need us…

 


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© 2016, Vicki Hinze. Vicki Hinze, The Marked Star PreviewVicki Hinze is the award-winning bestselling author of nearly thirty novels in a variety of genres including, suspense, mystery, thriller, and romantic or faith-affirming thrillers. Her latest releases are: The Marked Star and In Case of Emergency: What You Need to Know When I Can’t Tell You (nonfiction). She holds a MFA in Creative Writing and a Ph.D. in Philosophy, Theocentric Business and Ethics. Hinze’s website: www.vickihinze.com. Facebook. Books. Twitter. Contact. KNOW IT FIRST! Subscribe to Vicki’s Monthly Newsletter!


 


 


 

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Published on March 31, 2016 08:55 • 3 views