Jim Hawkins





Jim Hawkins

Author profile


About this author


Average rating: 3.82 · 643 ratings · 89 reviews · 24 distinct works · Similar authors
Al Kaline: The Biography of...
by
3.85 of 5 stars 3.85 avg rating — 39 ratings — published 2010 — 6 editions
Rate this book
Clear rating
Interzone 244
by
3.12 of 5 stars 3.12 avg rating — 8 ratings — published 2013
Rate this book
Clear rating
The Living One
2.5 of 5 stars 2.50 avg rating — 6 ratings
Rate this book
Clear rating
The Detroit Tigers Encyclop...
by
3.75 of 5 stars 3.75 avg rating — 4 ratings — published 2003
Rate this book
Clear rating
Tales from Augusta
4.0 of 5 stars 4.00 avg rating — 1 rating — published 2002 — 2 editions
Rate this book
Clear rating
The Spike Garden
0.0 of 5 stars 0.00 avg rating — 0 ratings — published 2009 — 2 editions
Rate this book
Clear rating
Tigers Confidential: The Un...
0.0 of 5 stars 0.00 avg rating — 0 ratings — published 2009
Rate this book
Clear rating
Tales from Augusta's Fairwa...
0.0 of 5 stars 0.00 avg rating — 0 ratings — published 2012 — 2 editions
Rate this book
Clear rating
Daddy, Tell Me a Story Abou...
0.0 of 5 stars 0.00 avg rating — 0 ratings — published 2011 — 2 editions
Rate this book
Clear rating
Tolley's Client Tax Plannin...
0.0 of 5 stars 0.00 avg rating — 0 ratings — published 2002
Rate this book
Clear rating
More books by Jim Hawkins…

Upcoming Events

No scheduled events. Add an event.

“After missing the cut at the 1957 Masters because of poor putting, Hogan retired to the clubhouse and suggested that putting should no longer be a part of the game. “If I had my way,” Hogan grumbled, “every golf green would be made into a huge funnel. You hit the funnel and the ball would roll down a pipe into the hole. I’ve always considered that golf is one game,” Hogan added, “and putting another.”
Jim Hawkins, Tales from Augusta

“President Dwight Eisenhower was a frequent and favored guest at Augusta National. One afternoon, Ike and some of his pals who were playing a leisurely round, were on the 15th green preparing to putt when a ball suddenly sailed into their midst. Moments later, an elderly man walked briskly onto the green, informed the President and his friends that he was playing through, then proceeded to sink his putt and depart — without another word. The rude intruder was baseball legend and Georgia native Ty Cobb.”
Jim Hawkins, Tales from Augusta



Is this you? Let us know. If not, help out and invite Jim to Goodreads.