Sylvia Ashton-Warner





Sylvia Ashton-Warner


Born
in Stratford, New Zealand
December 17, 1908

Died
April 28, 1984


Average rating: 3.91 · 272 ratings · 37 reviews · 9 distinct works · Similar authors
Teacher

4.08 avg rating — 207 ratings — published 1901 — 12 editions
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Spinster

3.33 avg rating — 42 ratings — published 1958 — 6 editions
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Greenstone

3.90 avg rating — 10 ratings — published 1966 — 2 editions
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I Passed This Way

really liked it 4.00 avg rating — 3 ratings — published 1979 — 4 editions
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Three

2.67 avg rating — 3 ratings
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Incense To Idols

liked it 3.00 avg rating — 2 ratings — published 1960 — 2 editions
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Myself

liked it 3.00 avg rating — 3 ratings — published 1968
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Bell Call

2.50 avg rating — 2 ratings
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The Kiss and the Ghost: Syl...

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liked it 3.00 avg rating — 1 rating — published 2009 — 4 editions
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More books by Sylvia Ashton-Warner…
“You must be true to yourself. Strong enough to be true to yourself. Brave enough to be strong enough to be true to yourself. Wise enough to be brave enough, to be strong enough to shape yourself from what you actually are.”
Sylvia Ashton-Warner

“So often I have said in the past, when a war is over, the statesmen should not go into conference one with another, but should turn their attention to the infant rooms, since it is from there that comes peace or war.”
Sylvia Ashton-Warner

“...the more violent the boy, the more I see that he creates, and when he kicks the others with his big boots, treads on fingers on the mat, hits another over the head with a piece of wood or throws a stone, I put clay in his hands, or chalk. He can create bombs if he likes or draw my house in flame, but it is the creative vent that is widening all the time and the destructive one atrophying, however much it may look to the contrary. And anyway I have always been more afraid of the weapon unspoken than of the one on the blackboard.”
Sylvia Ashton-Warner, Teacher

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