Wendy Darling




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Wendy Darling

Goodreads Author


Born
in Methuen, Massachusetts, The United States
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Member Since
January 2008

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Based in Atlanta, Georgia, Wendy Darling is an author and editor who has primarily worked with Wraeththu Mythos fiction but also has experience with non-fiction writing and other genre writing.

Wendy is co-author of Breeding Discontent, published by Immanion Press in 2003 as the first Wraeththu Mythos novel.

Wendy has been involved in Wraeththu in many different capacities, including editor of Storm Constantine's revised Wraeththu Chronicles, webmaster of the Inception and Forever Wraeththu fan web sites, and staff at several Wraeththu conventions.

She also co-edited three Wraeththu Mythos story collections, Paragenesis: Stories from the Dawn of Wraeththu (2010), Para Imminence: Stories of the Future of Wraeththu (2012), and Para Kindred: En
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Wendy Darling Perhaps a strange answer, but on a few occasions I have found reading something really terrible, like a crappy novel or a story with "potential"…morePerhaps a strange answer, but on a few occasions I have found reading something really terrible, like a crappy novel or a story with "potential" that's not fully realized, is the perfect inspiration. You say "Wait, that person got a publishing deal on that piece of crap? I can do better!" (less)
Wendy Darling When you realize you've created something out of nothing. This is especially rewarding when you're talking about characters who become "real" as you…moreWhen you realize you've created something out of nothing. This is especially rewarding when you're talking about characters who become "real" as you write them and eventually just begin to talk on their own. Then you realize, somehow you "birthed" this character.(less)
Average rating: 3.88 · 51 ratings · 3 reviews · 10 distinct works · Similar authors
Breeding Discontent

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3.88 avg rating — 51 ratings — published 2003 — 4 editions
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The 12 Cats of Christmas (M...

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A Dream and a Lie

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More books by Wendy Darling…
Every now and then, people ask me for a complete list of Wraeththu Mythos books, so I've finally come up with one using the Listopia tool here on Goodreads:

Complete Wraeththu Mythos

Looking at the list, I'm proud to say I've been involved most of these, including the Wraeththu Histories (starting with The Wraiths of Will and Pleasure, the Wraeththu Mythos anthologies (starting with Paragenesis... Read more of this blog post »
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Published on December 22, 2014 12:26 • 163 views • Tags: immanion-press, storm-constantine, the-moonshawl, wraeththu

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Wendy’s Recent Updates

Gender Outlaw by Kate Bornstein
“Definitions have their uses in much the same way that road signs make it easy to travel: they point out the directions. But you don't get where you're going when you just stand underneath some sign, waiting for it to tell you what to do.”
Kate Bornstein
5854
“As an exercise, can you recall the last time you saw someone whose gender was ambiguous? Was this person attractive to you? And if you knew they called themselves neither a man nor a woman, what would it make you if you're attracted to that person? And if you were to kiss? Make love? What would you be?”
Kate Bornstein
My Gender Workbook by Kate Bornstein
“We change our attitudes, our careers, our relationships. Even our age changes minute by minute. We change our politics, our moods, and our sexual preferences. We change our outlook, we change our minds, we change our sympathies. Yet when someone changes hir gender, we put hir on some television talk show. Well, here’s what I think: I think we all of us do change our genders. All the time. Maybe it’s not as dramatic as some tabloid headline screaming “She Was A He!” But we do, each of us, change our genders. In response to each interaction we have with a new or different person, we subtly shift the kind of man or woman, boy or girl, or whatever gender we’re being at the moment. We’re usually not the same kind of man or woman with our lover as we are with our boss or a parent. When we’re introduced for the first time to someone we find attractive, we shift into being a different kind of man or woman than we are with our childhood friends. We all change our genders.”
Kate Bornstein
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March: Book Three (March, #3)
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Wendy Darling started reading
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More of Wendy's books…
W.B. Yeats
“The best lack all conviction, while the worst are full of passionate intensity.”
W.B. Yeats, The Collected Poems of W.B. Yeats

E.M. Forster
“I suggest that the only books that influence us are those for which we are ready, and which have gone a little further down our particular path than we have yet gone ourselves.”
E.M. Forster

Ursula K. Le Guin
“Light is the left hand of darkness
and darkness the right hand of light.
Two are one, life and death, lying
together like lovers in kemmer,
like hands joined together,
like the end and the way.”
Ursula K. Le Guin, The Left Hand of Darkness

W.H. Auden
“The stars are not wanted now: put out every one;
Pack up the moon and dismantle the sun;
Pour away the ocean and sweep up the wood.
For nothing now can ever come to any good.”
W.H. Auden, Selected Poems

W.H. Auden
“In Brueghel’s Icarus, for instance: how everything turns away
Quite leisurely from the disaster, the ploughman may
Have heard the splash, the forsaken cry,
But for him it was not an important failure; the sun shone
As it had to on the white legs disappearing into the green water,
And the expensive ship that must have seen
Something amazing, a boy falling out of the sky,
Had somewhere to get to and sailed calmly on.”
W.H. Auden

26989 Goodreads Authors/Readers — 25152 members — last activity 25 minutes ago
This group is dedicated to connecting readers with Goodreads authors. It is divided by genres, and includes folders for writing resources, book websit ...more
6181 Goodreads Sci-Fi/Fantasy Authors — 1921 members — last activity Sep 29, 2016 09:20AM
Either you write it, Read it, But you must LOVE IT! DISCUSS!



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message 20: by Wendy

Wendy Darling My latest book (co-editor with Storm Constantine) is now listed on Goodreads! Check out Para Kindred: Enigmas of Wraeththu. Available April 18th from Immanion Press.


message 19: by Wendy

Wendy Darling Just spent some time trying to find a column I had in the AJC years ago. Didn't find it, but was confronted with the amazing achievements of my packrat nature. So much memorabilia, either personal or saved. I don't have nearly the time to share THAT archive, but one thing I did grab was this record I did of my reading for 1994-1995, i.e. 20 years ago. This would've been my freshman/sophomore year of college:

FOR SCHOOL
Second Shift
Understanding Psychology
Constitutional Law for a Changing America
The Roots of Evil
The Penguin Book of Gay Short Stories
The Penguin Book of Lesbian Short Stories
Angels in America: Millenium Approaches
News Reporting and Writing

VOLUNTARY
Shout!
A Tale of Two Cities
The Book of Endings
Last Watch of the Night
Queer in America
Boys of the Rock
Gender Outlaw
Cross Dressing, Sex, and Gender
Quentin Crisp's Book of Quotes
The Stranger
The Celluloid Closet
State of the USA Atlas
Memnoch the Devil
In My Room: Teenagers in Their Bedroms
City: Rediscovering the Center
The Invention of Homosexuality
Sybil
Spock's World
Helter Skelter
Unleashed: Poems by Writers' Dogs
The College Woman's Handbook


message 18: by Wendy

Wendy Darling What I'm reading next:

In the Beginning (Chaim Potok)
Iron Council (China Mieville)
The Divided (Katie Waitman)
The End of Nature (Bill McKibben)
Collapse: How Socieites Choose to Fail or Succeed (Jared Diamond)

I also now have a second vintage copy of The Razor's Edge, thanks to my brother, but I think I will wait on rereading until I've at least gone through these. Or it feels right.


message 17: by Wendy

Wendy Darling And for non-fiction I've read in 2011, there are 3 stand-outs:

Black Like Me (John Howard Griffin)
The World Without Us (Alan Weisman)
Why We Buy: The Science of Shopping (Paco Underhill)


message 16: by Wendy

Wendy Darling ‎10 Best Fiction Books I've Read in 2011

Bridge of Darnath (4 books) -- Carol Berg
Lighthouse Duet (2 books) -- Carol Berg
Drawing Blood -- Poppy Z. Brite
Geek Love -- Catherine Dunn
Thomas the Rhymer -- Ellen Kushner
Swordspoint -- Ellen Kushner
The Privilege of the Sword -- Ellen Kushner
The Fall of the Kings -- Ellen Kushner
Lavinia -- Ursula K. Le Guin
Four Ways to Forgiveness -- Ursula K. Le Guin

Note:
The first "two" books are actually 6. Also, while I tried only to list first-reads, I list Swordspoint because this time I gave it more of a fair shake and loved it. Also Four Ways is less a novel and more 4 longish short stories.


message 15: by Wendy

Wendy Darling Skimming through one of my fav scifi books The Merro Tree by Katie Waitman. It really touches me. I've reread it quite a few times.


message 14: by Wendy

Wendy Darling Wow. According to GoodReads, I've read almost 9000 pages this year. Total number of books is 21. Obviously some of those are long!


message 13: by Wendy

Wendy Darling Wendy wrote: "Think I'm going to reread Swordspoint. After Thomas the Rhymer, I am craving more Ellen Kushner.

Well, I did indeed reread Swordspoint and liked it much better this time, and even though I still got a little lost with all the intrigue, I did better at following it. Meanwhile yesterday and today I gobbled up Priledge of the Sword, which was marvelous. The short story included at the end of Swordspoint with the Duke dying is now even more poignant.


message 12: by Wendy

Wendy Darling Think I'm going to reread Swordspoint. After Thomas the Rhymer, I am craving more Ellen Kushner. And since I don't have Fall of the Kings (yet) I will make due with what I have. Maybe it will improve on rereading. I just know the first time around I was disappointed, but it might have been the heaps of praise I'd heard about it. It's well written, just missing the proper (in my opinion) amount of juiciness and spiciness. And it has too much intrigue. (And yes, I am rambling!)


message 11: by Wendy

Wendy Darling Went to Borders close-out sale and came home with:

- Spirit Lens (Carol Berg)
- Fahrenheit 451 (Ray Bradbury)
- Neuromancer (William Gibson)
...- Flesh and Fire (Laura Anne Gilman)
- Diary of a Madman, etc. (Nicolai Gogol)
- Black Like Me (John Howard Griffin)
- Scarlet Letter (Nathaniel Hawthorne)
- Thomas the Rhymer (Ellen Kushner)
- NYT Sunday Crossword Tribute to Eugene T. Maleska

Combo of couple of old favs & things on my to-read list. Plus my crack, i.e. crosswords.


message 10: by Wendy

Wendy Darling Fantasy Cliches

Some recent reading has got my mind on the topic of fantasy cliches, in part because I'd like to do some writing (gasp!) and really, really want to avoid these. I suppose I'm mainly talking about "typical" Medieval type fantasy, not at all Dark Fantasy, as there's certainly fantasy out there that has nothing whatever to do with swords and sorcerers...

So here's what I came up with the other day:

apocalyptic scenarios
Celtic influences
centaurs
corrupt council
dragons
dungeons
empires
European analogies
European words
evil priest
evil sorcerer
evil warlord
famine
fortresses
grand destinies
heterosexuality / het.-only romance
hidden/parallel worlds
horses
kings and queens
lost ancient civilizations
lost heirs
magic
magical caves
magical objects
magical races / species
Medieval / Renaissance type society/technology/etc.
monasteries
no electricity
political intrigue out the wazoo
plague
plucky peasant kids
polytheism
portals
rigid class system
Roman Empire parallels
salty old warriors
saving the world
secret identities
self-contained "world"*
servants
slavery
soul transfer / reincarnation
sorcery / black magic
spies
swearing by gods ("Deunor's teeth!")
swords
torture
tragically flawed princes
tunics, tabards, breeches, etc.
war
warlike/scholar contrasted siblings
warrior women
witch hunts and inquisitions

* Meaning that events take place which are worldwide significance (say: fate of the planet or universe) and yet only on kingdom on a whole planet is involved, which makes me wonder what other drama is going on elsewhere. Seriously, a prince, his sorcerer and a smart peasant woman are the center of the world? Really?"


message 9: by Wendy (last edited Mar 28, 2011 10:31AM)

Wendy Darling After coming up with a long list of fantasy cliches, I started thinking about makes GOOD fantasy and then about my favorite fantasy reads. Here's my list:

Stand-alone

Calenture (Storm Constantine)
The City of Dreaming Book (Walter Moers)
Imajica (Clive Barker)
The Lathe of Heaven (Ursula K. Le Guin)
Perdido Street Station (China Mieville)
The Scar (China Mieville)
Sign for the Sacred (Storm Constantine)
Thin Air (Storm Constantine)
The Thorn boy (Storm Constantine)
Tourniquet: Tales from the Renegade City (Kim Lakin-Smith)
Wicked Gentlemen (Ginn Hale)

Series

Dream and a Lie (Fiona McGavin)
Bridge of D'Arnath (Carol Berg)
Earthsea (Ursula K. Le Guin)
Harry Potter (J.K. Rowling)
Kushiel's Legacy (Jacqueline Carey)
Lighthouse (Carol Berg)
Nightrunner (Lynn Flewelling)
Magravandias (Storm Constantine)
Stone Dance of the Chameleon (Ricardo Pinto)
Tales of the Flat Earth (Tanith Lee)
Tamir Triad (Lynn Flewelling)
Wraeththu (3 trilogies + singles) (Storm Constantine)

Story Anthologies

The Birthday of the World and Other Stories (Ursula K. Le Guin)
Dreams of Dark and Light (Tanith Lee)
Mythanima (Storm Constantine)
The Oracle Lips (Storm Constantine)

Suggestions?

So, based on this, what else might I like? I like my fantasy WEIRD.

Wendy


message 8: by Wendy

Wendy Darling Finished Guardians of the Keep (Carol Berg) in less than two days. And I was pacing myself and have a job and slept. I had books 3 & 4 of the series at home but might take a break for a day or two. I suspect yet MORE torture, slavery and mayhem.


message 7: by Wendy

Wendy Darling Just received Books 2-4 of Bridge to D'Arnath and it's everything I can to resist tearing into them immediately.


message 6: by Wendy

Wendy Darling Thought about starting a book this weekend but didn't because the next three Bridge to D'Arnath will be arriving probably tomorrow. There is no WAY I'll be able to resist cracking Book 2 immediately. I already stopped reading Party of One halfway through because a) it was annoying me and b) Book 1 arrived and from page 1 was addictive.


message 5: by Wendy

Wendy Darling Just ordered books 2, 3 & 4 of the Bridge to D'Arnath because I only have about 100 pages left in Book 1 and I know I'm going to want to read the next one SOON. This one is getting better by the page!


message 4: by Wendy

Wendy Darling During lunch I was reading Son of Avonar and almost broke out in tears at the description of Karon's last days. That was just heart-wrenching!


message 3: by Wendy (last edited Mar 17, 2011 05:51AM)

Wendy Darling Overnight I could not stop thinking about the book I'm reading, Son of Avonar. Like I'd wake up in the middle of the night and start thinking about it, speculating, going over dialog... Think I had dreams about it.


message 2: by Wendy

Wendy Darling Stephanie wrote: "Hey Wendy! Thanks for accepting my friendship. :)"

No problem. Although I wouldn't be able to make it to any in person meet-ups unless they're in town (I don't drive) I enjoy people with good tastes in books :)


Stephanie Hey Wendy! Thanks for accepting my friendship. :)


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