Melanie Mitchell





Melanie Mitchell

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Average rating: 3.96 · 1,458 ratings · 162 reviews · 140 distinct works · Similar authors
Complexity: A Guided Tour
3.99 of 5 stars 3.99 avg rating — 1,073 ratings — published 2009 — 4 editions
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An Introduction to Genetic ...
3.77 of 5 stars 3.77 avg rating — 108 ratings — published 1996 — 5 editions
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Good Night: A Touch & Feel ...
4.35 of 5 stars 4.35 avg rating — 23 ratings — published 2008
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Good Morning, Good Night!: ...
4.05 of 5 stars 4.05 avg rating — 169 ratings — published 2004 — 5 editions
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Are You Ticklish? (Touch & ...
4.09 of 5 stars 4.09 avg rating — 11 ratings — published 2008
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Out of the Shadows
4.43 of 5 stars 4.43 avg rating — 7 ratings — published 2013 — 8 editions
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From Maple Tree to Syrup
3.6 of 5 stars 3.60 avg rating — 10 ratings — published 2003 — 6 editions
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Moon (First Step Nonfiction)
3.0 of 5 stars 3.00 avg rating — 7 ratings — published 2004 — 2 editions
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The Nurse's Bodyguard
3.86 of 5 stars 3.86 avg rating — 7 ratings — published 2014 — 5 editions
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Monkee Magic: a Book about ...
4.17 of 5 stars 4.17 avg rating — 6 ratings — published 2013 — 3 editions
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“Whew, this might be getting a bit confusing. I hope you are following me so far. This is the point in every Theory of Computation course at which students either throw up their hands and say "I can't get my mind around this stuff!" or clap their hands and say "I love this stuff!"

Needless to say, I was the second kind of student, even though I shared the confusion of the first.”
Melanie Mitchell, Complexity: A Guided Tour

“This statement is not provable.” Think about it for a minute. It’s a strange statement, since it talks about itself—in fact, it asserts that it is not provable. Let’s call this statement “Statement A.” Now, suppose Statement A could indeed be proved. But then it would be false (since it states that it cannot be proved). That would mean a false statement could be proved—arithmetic would be inconsistent. Okay, let’s assume the opposite, that Statement A cannot be proved. That would mean that Statement A is true (because it asserts that it cannot be proved), but then there is a true statement that cannot be proved—arithmetic would be incomplete. Ergo, arithmetic is either inconsistent or incomplete.”
Melanie Mitchell, Complexity: A Guided Tour

“complex system: a system in which large networks of components with no central control and simple rules of operation give rise to complex collective behavior, sophisticated information processing, and adaptation via learning or evolution.”
Melanie Mitchell, Complexity: A Guided Tour



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