Carl Safina




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Carl Safina

Goodreads Author


Born
in Brooklyn, NY, The United States
May 23, 1955

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Member Since
May 2010

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Carl Safina’s work has been recognized with MacArthur, Pew, and Guggenheim Fellowships, and his writing has won Orion, Lannan, and National Academies literary awards and the John Burroughs, James Beard, and George Rabb medals. He has a PhD in ecology from Rutgers University. Safina is the inaugural holder of the endowed chair for nature and humanity at Stony Brook University, where he co-chairs the steering committee of the Alan Alda Center for Communicating Science and is founding president of the not-for-profit organization, The Safina Center. He hosted the 10-part PBS series Saving the Ocean with Carl Safina. His writing appears in The New York Times, Audubon, Orion, and other periodicals and on the Web at National Geographic News and Vi ...more

Co-authored by Sylvia Earle



Six years ago we rushed to the Gulf of Mexico after Deepwater Horizon exploded and BP’s well gushed oil for 87 panicked-filled days of oiled beaches, oiled birds, oiled turtles, dead dolphins, and shattered human lives.




But memories are short, so we’re drilling for more in harder, riskier places. Last month, the Obama administration made the decision to lease parts of...

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Published on April 26, 2016 16:21 • 7 views
Average rating: 4.27 · 2,301 ratings · 356 reviews · 20 distinct works · Similar authors
Song for the Blue Ocean: En...

4.30 avg rating — 565 ratings — published 1998 — 4 editions
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Beyond Words: What Animals ...

4.38 avg rating — 605 ratings — published 2015 — 6 editions
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Voyage of the Turtle: In Pu...

4.17 avg rating — 436 ratings — published 2006 — 6 editions
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The View from Lazy Point: A...

4.23 avg rating — 306 ratings — published 2011 — 4 editions
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Eye of the Albatross: Visio...

4.22 avg rating — 246 ratings — published 2002 — 6 editions
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A Sea in Flames: The Deepwa...

3.81 avg rating — 70 ratings — published 2011 — 5 editions
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More books by Carl Safina…

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The Meaning of Hu...
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Life Everlasting:...
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The Boys in the B...
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Carl's Recent Updates

Carl Safina wrote a new blog post
Juvenile salmon in Skeena Estuary. Credit: Tavish Campbell
The Skeena River snakes out of fir-lined fjords on the misty northern coast of British Co... Read more of this blog post »
Carl Safina made a comment on What I Eat
" Thank you Katie.

I don't think I mentioned that it's also important to me, as an ideal, that all our food have a story we can share at the table. Who w
...more "
Carl Safina rated a book really liked it
Why Homer Matters by Adam Nicolson
Why Homer Matters
by Adam Nicolson
read in March, 2016
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First, this is a really beautifully crafted book. At times just lovely writing that's pure pleasure. At other times really clear-headed prose that is informative—and there's pure pleasure in that, too.

The book is so good as writing that it almost doe
...more
Carl Safina rated a book really liked it
Dying Every Day by James Romm
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This kind of history usually isn't my thing as a reader, but I'd met the author and as a courtesy he sent it to me. I was absolutely astonished! If you think we have leaders who are out-of-control spoiled brats floated by a compliant senate, it is no ...more
Carl Safina rated a book it was amazing
Jimmy Bluefeather by Kim Heacox
Jimmy Bluefeather
by Kim Heacox (Goodreads Author)
read in October, 2015
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I don't read much fiction. I read this book because not long ago I traveled with the author and have kept up a correspondence; he's a good guy. But that's not why I am saying that Jimmy Bluefeather is perhaps the best-written novel I've ever read, on ...more
Beyond Words by Carl Safina
Carl Safina rated a book it was ok
The Selfish Gene by Richard Dawkins
The Selfish Gene
by Richard Dawkins (Goodreads Author)
read in November, 2015
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I'd never read this epoch-making book because, as a scientist (ecologist) myself, I pretty much knew the basis and ideas in the book. Only after the New York Review of Books compared the impact on the reviewer of my own book Beyond Words to The Selfi
...more
Carl Safina shared a quote
Beyond Words by Carl Safina
“And finally I saw that the very land itself had risen, that the sunbaked land had taken form as something vast and alive, and was in motion. The land walked as multitudes, their strides so utterly of the earth that they seemed the source of the very dust. The cloud they raised engulfed us, seeped into every pore, coated our teeth, seeped into our minds. Both flesh and metaphor. That big.
And you could see their heads, like warriors’ shields. Their great breaths, gushing in and out, resonant in the halls of their lungs. The skin as they moved, wrinkled with time and wear, batiked with the walk of ages, as if they lived within the creased maps of the lives they’ve traveled. Travelers across landscapes, and through timescapes. The skin moving like swishing corduroy, textured and rough but sensitive to the slightest touch. The grind of their cobblestone molars as, sheaf by sheaf and mouthful by mouthful, they acquire the world. All the while uttering the contented purring of mounds of mem
...more
Carl Safina
Carl Safina shared a quote
Beyond Words by Carl Safina
“We look at the world through our own eyes, naturally. But by looking from the inside out, we see an inside-out world. This book takes the perspective of the world outside us—a world in which humans are not the measure of all things, a human race among other races. ...In our estrangement from nature we have severed our sense of the community of life and lost touch with the experience of other animals. ...understanding the human animal becomes easier in context, seeing our human thread woven into the living web among the strands of so many others.”
Carl Safina
22933
date: November 17, 2015 03:35PM
location: The Explorers Club, tickets required; please see website, The United States
description: This is our annual fundraiser dinner for The Safina Center. This year's will be best-ever.
More of Carl's books…
“Saving the world requires saving democracy. That requires well-informed citizens. Conservation, environment, poverty, community, education, family, health, economy- these combine to make one quest: liberty and justice for all. Whether one's special emphasis is global warming or child welfare, the cause is the same cause. And justice comes from the same place being human comes from: compassion.”
Carl Safina, The View from Lazy Point: A Natural Year in an Unnatural World

“Ethics that focus on human interactions, morals that focus on humanity's relationship to a Creator, fall short of these things we've learned. They fail to encompass the big take-home message, so far, of a century and a half of biology and ecology: life is- more than anything else- a process; it creates, and depends on, relationships among energy, land, water, air, time and various living things. It's not just about human-to-human interaction; it's not just about spiritual interaction. It's about all interaction. We're bound with the rest of life in a network, a network including not just all living things but the energy and nonliving matter that flows through the living, making and keeping all of us alive as we make it alive. We can keep debating ideologies and sending entreaties toward heaven. But unless we embrace the fuller reality we're in- and reality's implications- we'll face big problems.”
Carl Safina, The View from Lazy Point: A Natural Year in an Unnatural World

“Fishing provides time to think, and reason not to. If you have the virtue of patience, an hour or two of casting alone is plenty of time to review all you’ve learned about the grand themes of life. It’s time enough to realize that every generalization stands opposed by a mosaic of exceptions, and that the biggest truths are few indeed. Meanwhile, you feel the wind shift and the temperature change. You might simply decide to be present, and observe a few facts about the drifting clouds…Fishing in a place is a meditation on the rhythm of a tide, a season, the arc of a year, and the seasons of life... I fish to scratch the surface of those mysteries, for nearness to the beautiful, and to reassure myself the world remains. I fish to wash off some of my grief for the peace we so squander. I fish to dip into that great and awesome pool of power that propels these epic migrations. I fish to feel- and steal- a little of that energy.”
Carl Safina, The View from Lazy Point: A Natural Year in an Unnatural World

Topics Mentioning This Author

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Science and Natur...: Group Read Nominations for October 2015 29 23 Oct 06, 2015 08:06AM  
The Seasonal Read...: This topic has been closed to new comments. Fall Challenge 2015: Completed Tasks (DO NOT DELETE POSTS) 3291 511 Nov 30, 2015 09:01PM  
The History Book ...: ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCES 70 255 Mar 13, 2016 07:32PM  
“Another big group of dolphins had just surfaced alongside our moving vessel—leaping and splashing and calling mysteriously back and forth in their squeally, whistly way, with many babies swift alongside their mothers. And this time, confined to just the surface of such deep and lovely lives, I was becoming unsatisfied. I wanted to know what they were experiencing, and why to us they feel so compelling, and so—close. This time I allowed myself to ask them the question that was forbidden fruit: Who are you? Science usually steers firmly from questions about the inner lives of animals. Surely they have inner lives of some sort. But like a child who is admonished that what they really want to ask is impolite, a young scientist is taught that the animal mind—if there is such—is unknowable. Permissible questions are “it” questions: where it lives; what it eats; what it does when danger threatens; how it breeds. But always forbidden—always forbidden—is the one question that might open the door: “Who?” — Carl Safina”
Carl Safina, Beyond Words: What Animals Think and Feel

“We look at the world through our own eyes, naturally. But by looking from the inside out, we see an inside-out world. This book takes the perspective of the world outside us—a world in which humans are not the measure of all things, a human race among other races. ...In our estrangement from nature we have severed our sense of the community of life and lost touch with the experience of other animals. ...understanding the human animal becomes easier in context, seeing our human thread woven into the living web among the strands of so many others.”
Carl Safina, Beyond Words: What Animals Think and Feel

“And finally I saw that the very land itself had risen, that the sunbaked land had taken form as something vast and alive, and was in motion. The land walked as multitudes, their strides so utterly of the earth that they seemed the source of the very dust. The cloud they raised engulfed us, seeped into every pore, coated our teeth, seeped into our minds. Both flesh and metaphor. That big.
And you could see their heads, like warriors’ shields. Their great breaths, gushing in and out, resonant in the halls of their lungs. The skin as they moved, wrinkled with time and wear, batiked with the walk of ages, as if they lived within the creased maps of the lives they’ve traveled. Travelers across landscapes, and through timescapes. The skin moving like swishing corduroy, textured and rough but sensitive to the slightest touch. The grind of their cobblestone molars as, sheaf by sheaf and mouthful by mouthful, they acquire the world. All the while uttering the contented purring of mounds of memories.
Their rumbles rolling through the air like distant thunder approaching, vibrating through the undulating ground and the roots of trees, rallying families and friends from the hills and rivers, sending among themselves greetings and recognitions and news of where they have been; sending to us a sign of something coming.
A mind moves a mountainous mass of muscle and bone, the brown eyes light a landscape, and one elephant rumbles in. See her squared brow, trace the tracks of snake-size blood vessels. Heralded by her own trumpet, applauded by her own clapping ears, she strikes us as timeless and a bit sublime, aware and deliberative, peaceful and nurturing and deadly dangerous as needs arise. Wise only within the confines of her capabilities, like us. Vulnerable. As we all are.
“Delicate and mighty, awesome and enchanted,” wrote Peter Matthiessen of them in The Tree Where Man Was Born, “commanding the silence ordinarily reserved for mountain peaks, great fires, and the sea.” Silence. Watch. Simply listen. They will not speak to us, but to each other they say much. Some of it, we hear. The rest is beyond words.”
Carl Safina, Beyond Words: What Animals Think and Feel




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