Garry Wills





Garry Wills

Author profile


born
in Atlanta, Georgia, The United States
May 22, 1934

gender
male

genre


About this author

Garry Wills is an author and historian, and a frequent contributor to the New York Review of Books. In 1993, he won a Pulitzer Prize for General Non-Fiction for his book Lincoln at Gettysburg: The Words That Remade America, which describes the background and effect of Abraham Lincoln's Gettysburg Address on November 19, 1863.



Average rating: 3.92 · 10,149 ratings · 934 reviews · 69 distinct works · Similar authors
Lincoln at Gettysburg: The ...
4.12 of 5 stars 4.12 avg rating — 4,792 ratings — published 1992 — 10 editions
Rate this book
Clear rating
What Jesus Meant
3.87 of 5 stars 3.87 avg rating — 691 ratings — published 2006 — 12 editions
Rate this book
Clear rating
James Madison (American Pre...
by
3.59 of 5 stars 3.59 avg rating — 479 ratings — published 2002 — 2 editions
Rate this book
Clear rating
What Paul Meant
3.63 of 5 stars 3.63 avg rating — 407 ratings — published 2006 — 17 editions
Rate this book
Clear rating
Nixon Agonistes: The Crisis...
4.19 of 5 stars 4.19 avg rating — 273 ratings — published 1969 — 11 editions
Rate this book
Clear rating
Papal Sin: Structures of De...
3.82 of 5 stars 3.82 avg rating — 242 ratings — published 2000 — 9 editions
Rate this book
Clear rating
Why I Am a Catholic
3.49 of 5 stars 3.49 avg rating — 229 ratings — published 2002 — 7 editions
Rate this book
Clear rating
What the Gospels Meant
3.77 of 5 stars 3.77 avg rating — 177 ratings — published 2008 — 9 editions
Rate this book
Clear rating
Saint Augustine
3.46 of 5 stars 3.46 avg rating — 236 ratings — published 1999 — 14 editions
Rate this book
Clear rating
Why Priests?
3.38 of 5 stars 3.38 avg rating — 201 ratings — published 2013 — 8 editions
Rate this book
Clear rating
More books by Garry Wills…

Upcoming Events

No scheduled events. Add an event.

“Only the winners decide what were war crimes. ”
Garry Wills

“Accountability is the essence of democracy. If people do not know what their government is doing, they cannot be truly self-governing. The national security state assumes the government secrets are too important to be shared, that only those in the know can see classified information, that only the president has all the facts, that we must simply trust that our rulers of acting in our interest.”
Garry Wills, Bomb Power: The Modern Presidency and the National Security State

“...that the Bomb altered our subsequent history down to its deepest constitutional roots. It redefined the presidency, as in all respects America's "Commander in Chief" (a term that took on a new and unconstitutional meaning in this period). It fostered an anxiety of continuing crisis, so that society was pervasively militarized. It redefined the government as a National Security State, with an apparatus of secrecy and executive control. It redefined Congress, as an executor of the executive. And it redefined the Supreme Court, as a follower of the follower of the executive. Only one part of the government had the supreme power, the Bomb, and all else must defer to it, for the good of the nation, for the good of the world, for the custody of the future, in a world of perpetual emergency superseding ordinary constitutional restrictions.”
Garry Wills



Is this you? Let us know. If not, help out and invite Garry to Goodreads.