E. Haldeman-Julius

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E. Haldeman-Julius

Author profile


born
in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, The United States
July 30, 1889

died
July 31, 1951

gender
male

website

genre

influences


About this author

In 1889, Emanuel Julius, later known as E. Haldeman-Julius, was born in Philadelphia, the son of Russian Jewish immigrants. Beginning odd-job work as a young teenager, Emanuel eventually became a newspaper copy boy. An early socialist, he educated himself at party headquarters, reading tracts on freethought, philosophy and economics. In 1906, Emanuel left his home for good, heading for New York City. His self-education continued when a sympathetic librarian at a girls' school in Tarrytown, where he had found work, introduced him to visiting dignitary Mark Twain. Emanuel's first attributed article, "Mark Twain: Radical," was published in a socialist periodical in 1910.

Emanuel worked for a variety of socialist newspapers, including New York E...more


Average rating: 3.73 · 37 ratings · 7 reviews · 35 distinct works · Similar authors
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Little Blue Book Series
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Proverbs of Japan
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Dust
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The Militant Agnostic
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Love Letters of Men and Wom...
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What Great Men Have Said Ab...
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A Collection of Buddhist Ma...
0.0 of 5 stars 0.00 avg rating — 0 ratings — published 2008
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The Essence of Buddhism
0.0 of 5 stars 0.00 avg rating — 0 ratings — published 2008 — 4 editions
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The meaning of atheism
0.0 of 5 stars 0.00 avg rating — 0 ratings — published 1931
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More books by E. Haldeman-Julius…
What Great Men Have Said Ab... Proverbs of Japan The Essence of Buddhism
Little Blue Book (4 books)
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3.0 of 5 stars 3.00 avg rating — 8 ratings

Ben Franklin said:
"Early to bed and early to rise
Make a man healthy wealthy and wise"

Lately I have read the advice given to William Randolph Hearst, when a young man, by his father:
"Go downtown at noon and rob the other fellows of what they have made during the morning.”
E. Haldeman-Julius

“When confronted by a ‘believer’ it is easy for me to contrast the views of the skeptic with those of the rationalist. I simply reach into my pocket and pull out my change.

Holding a quarter aloft, I say, ‘This is a most remarkable coin, for it is heavier than all the sins of humanity committed since the beginning of the human race.’

I then hold up a nickel and say, ‘This coin is even more amazing, as it is brighter and shinier than the flames that proceeded from the Burning Bush discovered on Mt. Sinai by Moses.’

Then I raise a penny and state, ‘This portrait of President Lincoln is more realistic and true-to-life than any portrait of Satan ever painted.’

And finally, I hold out a bright, shiny dime and say, ‘And this dime is the most amazing of all because it is heavier and contains more precious metals than all the gold bricks in the streets of Heaven.’

I end with ‘Give to Caesar what is his, and hold the rest of it dear—for it is all you see and touch—and the Christian god can take care of all his things, for they amount to less than this 41 cents I hold here in my hand.”
E. Haldeman-Julius

“Atheism is a conclusion reached by the most reasonable methods and one which is not asserted dogmatically but is explained in its every feature by the light of reason. The atheist does not boast of knowing in a vainglorious, empty sense. He understands by knowledge the most reasonable and clear and sound position one can take on the basis of all the evidence at hand. This evidence convinces him that theism is not true, and his logical position, then, is that of atheism.

We repeat that the atheist is one who denies the assumptions of theism. he asserts, in other words, that he doesn't believe in a God because he has no good reason for believing in a God. That's atheism -- and that's good sense.”
E. Haldeman-Julius, The meaning of atheism