Elizabeth Speller




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Elizabeth Speller

Goodreads Author


Born
The United Kingdom
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Member Since
February 2010


Elizabeth Speller is a poet and author of four non-fiction books including a biography of Emperor Hadrian, companion guides to Rome and to Athens, and a memoir, Sunlight on the Garden. She has contributed to publications as varied as the Financial Times, Big Issue and Vogue and produced the libretto for a requiem for Linda McCartney, Farewell, composed by Michael Berkeley (OUP). She currently has a Royal Literary Fund Fellowship at Warwick and divides her life between Gloucestershire and Greece. She was a prize-winner in both the Ledbury and Bridport poetry competitions in 2008, and her poem, 'Finistere' was shortlisted for the Forward Poetry Prize in 2009. More profitably she is also a ghost blogger.

Average rating: 3.66 · 3,747 ratings · 698 reviews · 12 distinct works · Similar authors
The Return of Captain John ...

3.66 avg rating — 2,374 ratings — published 2010 — 21 editions
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The Strange Fate of Kitty E...

3.66 avg rating — 952 ratings — published 2011 — 13 editions
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The First of July

3.73 avg rating — 285 ratings — published 2013 — 12 editions
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Following Hadrian: A Second...

3.55 avg rating — 71 ratings — published 2002 — 8 editions
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The Sunlight on the Garden:...

3.54 avg rating — 35 ratings — published 2006 — 4 editions
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Kaptein John Emmetts hjemkomst

it was ok 2.00 avg rating — 1 rating
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At Break of Day

4.50 avg rating — 4 ratings — published 2013
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Granta City Guides: Rome

4.50 avg rating — 4 ratings — published 2005
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Athens: A New Guide

liked it 3.00 avg rating — 1 rating — published 2004
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Untitled Elizabeth Speller

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More books by Elizabeth Speller…
I love the Scops owl; small enough to sit on a human hand - about 5” high - with a hooked beak and expression of utmost ferocity, it clearly has no idea that it is not as impressively fierce or as romantically Gothic as its many cousins.


...Meanwhile, Igor, the white dog next door on the goat-and-chicken smallholding (equally unaware of how small and, in his case, fluffily unimpressive, he is)... Read more of this blog post »
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The Return of Captain John ... The Strange Fate of Kitty E...
Laurence Bartram (2 books)
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3.66 avg rating — 3,326 ratings

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Elizabeth Speller is now friends with Miranda Bolter
Following Hadrian by Elizabeth Speller
“The Romans learned what European armies were to discover hundreds of years later: that the best-trained and best-equipped fighting force in the world might come to grief against partisans fighting on their own territory and for a cause for which they would willingly sacrifice themselves and their families.”
Elizabeth Speller
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Long Lane with Turnings by L.J.K. Setright
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Godzone by Michael Bywater
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The First of July by Elizabeth Speller
"Wasn't sure what to make of this when I started it, but then found it hard to put down. Writing is excellent, especially the character development. Well-worth reading!"
At Break of Day by Elizabeth Speller
"This is in a different league to Elizabeth Speller's first two novels which were inter-war Agatha Christie-style whodunnits, and more akin to her lovely memoir The Sunlight on the Garden: A Memoir of Love, War and Madness in its psychological insi..." Read more of this review »
The First of July by Elizabeth Speller
"I enjoyed this book very much. Thank God it wasn't like a bunch of WWI fiction I have had the misfortune of wasting my time with,where the female characters are so wishy-washy you want to smack them or so militant you want to tranquilize them just..." Read more of this review »
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More of Elizabeth's books…
“He had long been indifferent to which side won; he wished only that one or the other would do so decisively while he was still alive.”
Elizabeth Speller

“The Romans learned what European armies were to discover hundreds of years later: that the best-trained and best-equipped fighting force in the world might come to grief against partisans fighting on their own territory and for a cause for which they would willingly sacrifice themselves and their families.”
Elizabeth Speller, Following Hadrian: A Second-Century Journey through the Roman Empire

“When the shot came, the rooks rose outward from their roost with coarse cries of alarm, but in a few minutes they returned, settling back into the bare branches until the first light of dawn.”
Elizabeth Speller, The Return of Captain John Emmett

Polls

January/February 2013 Group Read

 
  48 votes, 13.6%

 
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More...
“The Romans learned what European armies were to discover hundreds of years later: that the best-trained and best-equipped fighting force in the world might come to grief against partisans fighting on their own territory and for a cause for which they would willingly sacrifice themselves and their families.”
Elizabeth Speller, Following Hadrian: A Second-Century Journey through the Roman Empire




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