Rosemary Clement-Moore's Blog

January 21, 2015

I sat down at the desk today with one goal:��get caught up on all the Internet stuff I’ve let slide while dealing with stuff IRL, as it were. So this was supposed to be a long post telling you all about…


1) The giant inflatable Santa that forced me to reroute my commute to the coffee shop.


(Can we just stop for a moment to appreciate that this monster is bigger than that house? And y’all wonder why Santa Claus gives me nightmares.)


2) Going Xmas shopping with the lovely Sally Hamilton.


(I totally bought that stuffed Pascal, btw. He’s my new totem animal.)



3) How my heater (and half my electricity)��went out on the coldest freaking day of the year, forcing me to build my first (on purpose) fire since Girl Scouts.



It’s nice to know I have at least one useful skill that will keep me from being booted out of the compound��after the zombie apocalypse.


4) Or how I spent New Years Eve huddled under five quilts and two dogs, eating all the food in the fridge before it went bad.


5) My new and slightly embarrassing addiction to Rainbow Honey nail polish. Because my addiction to lip gloss��isn’t��girly enough.


Instead I have to tell you about how I have managed to lose my freaking domain names, at least for the moment. Neither readrosemary.com or rosemaryclementmoore.com go to my webpage (aka this blog) right now. (The gist is, I let them lapse (oops) because heater repairs are expensive (ouch) and someone grabbed them both up on the day they became available (grr). What anyone is going to do with rosemaryclementmoore.com, I don’t know. But I suspect the answer is “sell them back to me at a profit.” Little do they know I’m a poor writer with a poor invalid Mother, who spends my holidays huddled by a log fire for warmth (and s’mores).


ANYWAY. ��My email address (rosemary at readrosemary dot com) will still get to me. And if you follow or bookmark this page, the address will remain the same as well. I’ll get it sorted.


That will teach me to stay off the Internet for too long!



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Published on January 21, 2015 11:19 • 25 views

November 17, 2014

You know that feeling you get when your teacher is posting grades for papers or tests? How you brace yourself, take a deep breath and hold it like you’re doing the Ice Bucket Challenge?


It’s the same thing with books.  Imagine getting your corrected test or term paper back, only it’s 400 pages long.


My edits still come on paper. The UPS man (or woman) knocks on my door and hands me a big, fat package. There’s no mistaking it for anything else. It’s manuscript shaped.


MSS1


I bring it in and set it on the kitchen counter with a mixture of reverence and terror. What is my editor going to say? How much am I going to have to rewrite? How many stupid mistakes did I make?  The only way to know is to open it and find out.


MSS2


That’s a lot of paper. On top is a letter that summarizes all the things that are wrong with the book. Sometimes this is a long letter.


I usually read it standing right there by the counter. Then I hyperventilate. And then I go for a walk, or a coffee, or a something, and I don’t come back until I stop feeling like a loser for not writing a Perfect First Draft. (No one writes a perfect first draft, no matter what they tell you. There are always things that can be better. I have been tempted to go through Barnes and Noble with a pen and tweak the phrasing here and there in my books on the shelf.)


That big pile of paper sits on the kitchen counter—maybe a few hours, maybe a day, maybe a weekend—while I cogitate on how I’m going to fix what I need to fix. (Sometimes it’s something big like “This entire part in the museum here doesn’t make sense.” Sometimes it’s small but pervasive, like adding more explanation of how magic works or description of settings.)


Finally, the manuscript gets to move to the workspace. (In this case, the sofa.)


MSS3


I’m not quite ready to open the document on the computer and start haphazardly making changes. First I go through my editors’ (and agent’s) notes, page by page, wincing at the things I think I should have caught myself, or the things I thought I could get away with but didn’t, scribbling my own ideas, getting up every now and then to freak out. Like, “How I’m going to cut 25 pages out of the middle without losing any of my brilliant scenes?!” Or, my favorite: “OMG I have to come up with a logical reason for that to happen?” Or it’s close cousin,”It doesn’t seem like they know what’s going on there because I don’t know what’s going on.”


From there on… I won’t say it’s easy, but the analytical part of your brain kicks in and you flinch less. Two things safe my sanity right now: (1) I know I’m my own worst critic while working on a book, but (2) I can still fix things. I try and enjoy that while it lasts.



PS It’s not a Goodnight book.


PPS  It doesn’t come out for more than a year. But it’s going to be EPIC when it does.


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Published on November 17, 2014 08:08 • 59 views

November 10, 2014

“Outside of a dog, a book is probably man’s best friend. Inside of a dog, it’s too dark to read.” — Groucho Marx


So, I hurt my finger. Not badly, just badly enough that typing became difficult for maybe a week, which meant I had an excuse to sit around and read all the things. Now I’m finally getting around to writing my book report(s). Have you read any of these? Tell me what you think about them in the comments.


Stuff I read:


Carrie, by Stephen King. I had never read this book because I knew the basic story and it sounded unpleasant. When I read King as a kid, it was strictly “horror” to me–slightly forbidden, definitely scary, but mentally in the realm of “popular novel.” Reading as an adult (and an author) I’m fascinated by how twisted and textured the novels are as well. If this were a different post, I could point out the elements of classic Tragedy (with a capital T) in Carrie, and a lot of King’s books. There’s a kind of Greek Chorus of observers, and Carrie is, like Lear and Hamlet and Antigone even, someone who evokes more pathos than empathy. (I’m trying to think what her fatal flaw would be. Tell me in the comments if you have an idea.)


I love when a book tells a great story AND I think about it months later and go “Ah ha. I see what you did there.” Which is not to say I don’t love a Dan Brown novel on an airplane, but that’s sort of like Fruit Loops. It tastes good as you gobble it up, but it’s not something you chew on and savor.


The Day She Died, by Catroina McPherson. This is an English author, and a random pick from the library’s new books shelf. A lucky pick, as it turns out. I was expecting more of a mystery triller, and it works on that level. But it’s also a sort of psychological piece as well. I’m continually on the lookout for mystery/thrillers like Gillian Flynn’s books, and this is kind of along those lines, though not as hard-edged. For me there was the mystery and suspense (Who should she trust? Who is lying? Is she even reliable as a narrator?) but it was also interesting how step with good intent can lead to another, and another, until you’re totally embroiled. I think I read this in one sitting.


I Want it That Way, by Ann Aguirre. This is the kick off title in Harlequin’s New Adult line, and here’s what’s cool about it. I have ambivalent feelings about the whole “New Adult” genre, because I loved books about college aged protagonists when I was in high school. But they used to simply be shelved on the fantasy/mystery/romance shelves. So what makes book “New Adult,” age or content? I don’t know.


However, I know a good book when I read it.  And I Want it that Way is a good read. You should know the characters have lots of sex without guilt or moralizing. The heroine is 20; she and the hero develop a good rapport/friendship before doing the deed. Nadia is in college and sees her hot neighbor and is all “What’s up with the brooding hot guy?” Turns out that what’s up is brooding hot guy is not a secret BDSM master, or a vampire CEO. He’s a single father at an age when he should be in college going to keg parties. But Nadia really really likes him. And he’s totally charmed by her, though he has to think about the effect a relationship would have on his son. So this is primarily a romance (I mentioned lots of sex, right?) but it also is about taking on adult responsibilities and knowing when you’re ready for that.


This is what I imagined when I hear the term “New Adult.” It’s basically a book for people who love YA, but also love racy romance. Which is a lot of people, because that’s how 50 shades happened. If New Adult is going to be a thing, then I hope there’s more of it that’s like this.


Have you read any of these? Share your opinion in the comments. And I would love a recommendation for what to read next. (Or add to my TBR shelf. Whichever.)


(Picture credit: jamelah e. on Flickr. CC License)


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Published on November 10, 2014 09:47 • 26 views

September 3, 2014

There are two ways to go with this post:

1) OMG, this has been the craziest summer EVER.

2) Oh. My. Gawd. This has been the most tedious summer ever.


By ‘craziness’ of course I mean ‘chaos’ and, seriously, I’d gotten to the point about mid-July where crises became so routine that it reached the point of tedium.


“Oh, there’s water pouring out of the ceiling? I guess that’s this week’s thing.”


“Did you just use the word ‘cracked’ and ‘engine’ in the same sentence. Just making sure. How many zeros in that estimate again? That many? Okee doke, let me get back to you on that.”


So yes. A lot of personal and family stuff going on the last few months. It’s like kayaking through the rapids (or so I imagine), where it’s challenging but not impossible, but it’s hard to spare the concentration for things like, oh, say blog posts. Or remembering to… Well, thinking about anything other than avoiding smashing on rocks or tipping over or whatever.


What if someone came up with an app that bent time just enough so that you could send yourself a text or an email from the future?


“Hey, you know that thing you’re thinking about right now? Go ahead and do it. Trust me on this. Sincerely, A Friend.”


I suppose life wouldn’t be the same if we knew the future. At least our personal future. I’ve been exploring this concept with an author friend of mine, who’s (incredibly entertaining) time travel book comes out next year. It’s easy to say “Oh, I wish I’d done/not done X or Y.” Hindsight, blah blah blah. I’m not talking about obvious mistakes. If you have sound decision A and sound decision B, each may lead to the same place via different paths, or to really different places. So say you’re in place A and you don’t like it. If you sent a message to past you saying “Take path B,” who’s to day that place B wouldn’t be worse/harder/sadder than place A?


No one can, unless you can see down the road in two alternate universes.


Maybe I’ve been watching too much Fringe on Netflix.


Netflix on the Apple TV now goes straight into the next episode of a series. So you’re like, “I’m going to turn this off after this episode, but then the teaser for the next episode starts before you can find the remote that slid between the sofa cussions, and then you’re hooked for another 43 minutes.*


Coming back from the theoretical and back to my own life (because this is my blog, and it’s all about me), I’m still kayaking, still avoiding rocks, still keeping my head above water (mostly).


Hey, sort of like most of the other people on the planet!


Life goes on, bra. La-la-la how life goes on.




*It’s not all Netflix and cupcakes around here. I’ve been working on a new paranormal romance that y’all are going to love! I’m having to do a lot or research about yacht racing, though. If anyone yacht races, email me, will you?)


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Published on September 03, 2014 08:17 • 39 views

July 7, 2014

TARDISI suspect I live in the TARDIS.  Sometimes I’ll be home and working (or whatever) and lose all sense of time and relative dimension in space. Well, in time anyway. One minute it’s the middle of July, the next its…. Wait. It’s July now, right? RIGHT?


There were fireworks the other night, so it must be July. Or maybe it’s November and I’ve teleported to Britain for Guy Fawkes day.


You know it’s bad when you have to put “Get out of house one hour a day” on your to do list. Or your MOM says things like, “Don’t you want to go out and get some… well, anything?” So I’m trying to go out someplace where there are other people, even if all I do is sit at my table in a cafe and doing the same thing I would be doing at home–drinking too much coffee and pounding inspired drivel onto the keyboard. Or making Pinterest boards for my latest project. That’s work, right?


I’ve actually got a few outings coming up.


This Saturday (June 12, 10am-12pm; click here for details)  I’m teaching at the Yellow Rose RWA chapter in Colleyville. I’m teaching my “Pitch” class in person–the one that I teach online, but with more hand gestures and those weird expressions I make when I talk.


On August 9th at 3pm (click here for details) I’ll be at an author event/booksigning with Rachel Caine and Ann Aguirre at the Firewheel Barnes and Noble in Garland, Texas. Rachel, Ann, and I will be doing a question and answer thing before signing, so it’s a great time to come and have fun with us.


Saturday August 16 from 1 – 4pm I’ll be at the Author Roundup at the Fort Worth Public Library (Central Branch). Here’s what the website says: Celebrate local, published authors of books for children and teens. Attend a panel discussion that will teach you to read critically and write confidently. Book signing to follow; authors’ books for sale at program. (All ages)


And the big one runs for 6 weeks. Go to the previous entry to find out more about the DFW Teen Writer’s Workshop, a writing workshop for, um, teens.


That’s what’s up. That and writing and stuff. Yay!


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Published on July 07, 2014 10:32 • 32 views

Rosemary Clement-Moore:

Teen writers in the DFW area. Starts soon! Totally free! Great teachers. Whoo!


Originally posted on DFW Writers Workshop:


DFW Writers’ Workshop is very proud to announce the schedule for the 2014 Teen Writer’s Summer Workshop!  The best part of this announcement is….the workshop is completely FREE.



The scheduled events will take place at The Egg & I on Hwy. 26, from 12:30 to 2:30. Below are the dates and the list of speakers, who are all DFWWW members and traditionally published authors.  The sessions will include instruction and critique time.




t-shirt-2

Adult sizes small, medium, large and extra large are $10 each. XXL and XXXL are $12 each




With registration, teens will get a binder full of helpful advice. At the end of the workshop, an anthology will be created with their work. It will include a short story, excerpt, or poem that is polished during the six-week session. Each student will get a printed copy and may purchase as many additional copies as they’d like.  AND there’s…


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Published on July 07, 2014 09:22 • 29 views

July 4, 2014

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Published on July 04, 2014 13:21 • 34 views

June 27, 2014

So I guess baby otters are a thing now, judging by my Twitter/tumblr feeds, though I have loved otters since way before they were Cool On The Internet. *pushes cute-nerdy-girl glasses on nose*  When I lived in Corpus Christi, I was a member of the Texas State Aquarium so I could go hang out and watch the otters whenever I wanted.


That’s not important. What is important is that you watch this video:



Oh. My. God. When I played this, Penny Dog went absolutely bonkers trying to find where that noise was coming from. So of course I had to move the laptop to another spot and play it again. And maybe a third time.


Anyway. This was filmed at the Chester Zoo in England. I do love a good zoo that takes the best care of the animals that they can. Obviously animals belong in their natural habitat, but when that habitat is disappearing, what are we going to do? What I like about the Chester Zoo is that they don’t limit their species preservation efforts to breeding programs. The zoo created the Act for Wildlife campaign, which works to preserve and restore natural habits all over the world. Even cooler, 100% of a donation goes to conservation efforts and none to administration. You can read about or donate to a specific species effort, or you can follow their blog to see how their projects are going.


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Published on June 27, 2014 11:14 • 30 views

June 24, 2014

Mary Shelley, arguably the first Science Fiction Writer. (This is relevant to this post.)

Mary Shelley, arguably the first Science Fiction Writer. (This is relevant to this post.)


I love when the premium channels like HBO and Showtime run free preview weekends, because it reassures me that I’m not missing much not subscribing to them. Even if it does mean I have to wait until the DVDs come out to catch up on Game of Thrones. Or read the series of books full of spoilers that bearded guy is writing. Whatever—


Cue record scratch thought derailment sound effect. That (above) was the start of  a Movie Monday post, because my mother has started reading blogs, which is a blog post in itself, and she has been nagging encouraging me to blog more often. It goes like this: “That other blog has a theme for every day of the week. Why don’t you do that? You’re so smart and funny, you should write that in your blog. You would have a lot more followers if you posted more often. This guy has way more followers than you, and he’s a monk.” (I am not even making that up.)


So I sit down to write a Movie Monday post. I’ll write about Ender’s Game, which I watched during the HBO free preview this weekend. Only I went looking for that faux article about George RR Martin writing spoilers for the GOT TV show, and then I found the picture below.


DirewolfandUnicorn

Photo taken (and tweeted) by the amazing artist/photographer Sarah Allegra (@sallegra). It is only tangentially related to this post.


Here follows my exact thought process from that moment until this:


1. Aw, that’s cute! GRRM has a little stuffed dire wolf.  Oh hey, that other guy has a little stuffed unicorn. Oh HEY, that’s Peter S. Beagle author of The Last Unicorn which is an amazing book (and an animated movie, so I guess this is still Movie Monday.) OMG The animals from their books are totally kissing noses! That’s so adorable!


2. Why is that funny? Two venerable old guys being dorks with toys from their books. That sort of makes them cooler. Authors! They’re just like us! Then I’m like, oh yeah, Ender’s Game.


3. Ender’s Game is kind of a venerable book itself, a military science fiction novel that explores the psychology of war and society, pretty much just like Starship Troopers (the novel) did, which also had giant bug-like aliens. I wonder why that is? Is it because the insectoid shape makes them seem true alien and icky, where a more mammalian thing might look like you could have it for a pet?


4. But Starship Troopers (the movie) was more action-y. It also had a lot more decapitations and impalements and also some brain sucking, if you like that sort of thing. Much more than the book.


5. This whole blog has become about venerable white guys who write science fiction and fantasy.  That’s just not right. I need to talk about some women science fiction writers.


6. Which women science fiction writers should I recommend? There’s Anne McCaffrey and Madeline L’Engle of course. Ursula L’Guin and Connie Willis. Would my blog readers be interested in them? I should go look up who are recent women science fiction writers (other than Suzanne Collins).


Literally the first line of A Wrinkle in Time. (This is the book that made me want to write books.)

Literally the first line of A Wrinkle in Time. (This is the book that made me want to write books.)


7. This first Google hit is a list of science fiction FOR girls, which is not the same thing, especially since half these books are by men.


8. THIS list starts with The Handmaiden’s Tale?  Ugh.  Well, there’s Willis and L’Guin. Oh yeah! Octavia Butler. A woman AND an African American. Yes, there’s Andre Norton, C.J. Cherryh, Lois McMaster Bujold. Also Elizabeth Moon. Well, there’s Kristine Kathryn Rusch, those are a little less dusty, more space opera-y. Tanya Huff!  I love her books.


9. These are great books, but kind of… old fashioned. Well, not all of them. I should still recommend them. They’re awesome, and my readers aren’t intimidated by big books.


10. But, still, I should look at YA science fiction and find some contemporary things to talk about, too. Oh, here’s Kirkus’s list of the Best Teen SFF books of 2013. Excellent!


11. Wow, these sound really good. I should put this on my Goodreads list so I remember them.


12. And maybe read a sample chapter…


13: Or two.


14. THREE HOURS LATER, I still haven’t written anything about Ender’s Game.


15. And it’s not even Monday any more.


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Published on June 24, 2014 06:00 • 29 views

June 10, 2014

I am really good at four things:



Writing.
Teaching.
Being humble.
Teaching about writing.

I’ve wanted to teach more online classes for awhile now, but first I had to beta test and tinker, and eventually announcing the classes became like sending a novel out on submission. I had to, like the ads say, Just Do It.


Which leads me nicely to the subject of my inaugural class:


Make Your Book a Must Read:

The Foundations of creating a stand-out pitch for your project. 


 


Click that title to go straight to the class description page. The first class is soon.


Don’t worry, loyal readers! I’m not quitting my day job. I wouldn’t mention it on the blog except I figured you might be curious what I’ve been doing with my time besides eating ice cream for breakfast and taking pictures of my dog. (Skip down if you’re not interested.)


What it is:


The class is about coming up with a description of your book that will make people want to read it right away. A “pitch” generally means ‘pitching’ the idea to a literary agent or editor to see if the might be interest in your book. (When you send a letter (or email, these days) it’s called a query letter.)


Who should take it:



You have finished your first draft and you’re getting ready to start the revisions. It will make your revisions easier, I swear.
You have polished your manuscript to be as awesome as can be and you’re ready to start trying to sell it to a publisher.
You plan to independently publish your work and you want a description that will make reader click, “Buy Now.”

And one more unlikely one:



You’ve started a book, or you’ve started a lot of them, and you can’t seem to find any traction. What make a good pitch makes a good story. This class is about finding the strongest elements of your story–the pillars that whole it up–which will help you write finish your novel. Trust me. I know whereof I speak.

Besides, the introductory price is crazy economical for this kind of class, so it’s low risk/high yield. You don’t have to travel to a conference, you don’t have to download any software, and you can see me but I can’t see you, so you can take the class in your pajamas


So, writers, what are you waiting for? Click through here to go to web class page, which has all the information. You can also get there from the “For Writers” menu at the top right of the header.


So, readers (and writers who are readers), I have been busy.  A lot of you have asked am I working on a new book, is there going to be a sequel to The Splendor Falls/the Goodnight books, am I ever going to leave my house and do an event again…?  The answers are yes, don’t worry be happy, and pretty soon, actually.


I will be moderating a panel of spooky awesome authors at the Valley Ranch Public Library on June 19th at 7pm. (Valley Ranch is kind of sort of part of Irving, TX. Ish.)


Also, I’m working on a new book that is going to make you happy if you enjoyed The Splendor Falls. (It’s not a sequel, sorry, but it’s mysterious and romantic and full of atmosphere. Also, if you haven’t figured it out yet, I like to connect my books, even when they’re not sequels. It’s just not always obvious.)


Other than that… you know I’m superstitious about talking about works in progress, right? That’s the problem. Everything I’m working on is kind of in progress!


 


What about you guys? Do you have projects in the works?  What are you working on right now?


 


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Published on June 10, 2014 16:19 • 34 views