Geoffrey Harvey





Geoffrey Harvey



Average rating: 4.10 · 315 ratings · 28 reviews · 11 distinct works · Similar authors
Thomas Hardy: Tess of the d...

4.02 avg rating — 147 ratings — published 2002
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Thomas Hardy

4.67 avg rating — 6 ratings — published 2003 — 6 editions
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Complete Critical Guide to ...

it was amazing 5.00 avg rating — 1 rating — published 2003 — 2 editions
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The Romantic Tradition in M...

0.00 avg rating — 0 ratings — published 1986 — 3 editions
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Sons and Lovers

0.00 avg rating — 0 ratings — published 1986
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The Art of Anthony Trollope

0.00 avg rating — 0 ratings — published 1980 — 2 editions
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Sons And Lovers

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The Forsyte Saga

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4.15 avg rating — 15,230 ratings — published 1921 — 169 editions
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Mr. Scarborough's Family

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3.89 avg rating — 130 ratings — published 1883 — 40 editions
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The Bertrams

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3.67 avg rating — 191 ratings — published 1859 — 34 editions
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“Insisting that his writing did not offer a philosophy of life, Hardy claims that each poem was an ‘impression’, intensely subjective and evanescent.”
Geoffrey Harvey, Thomas Hardy

“Hardy classified A Pair of Blue Eyes among ‘Romances and Fantasies’. A favourite of Tennyson, its melancholy treatment of youth, love and death is expressive of late nineteenth-century susceptibilities. Not unnaturally in an early novel, Hardy draws freely on his own life.”
Geoffrey Harvey, Thomas Hardy

“A turning point in the criticism of Hardy’s poetry came in his centenary year, in which W. H. Auden (1940) recorded his indebtedness to Hardy for his own education in matters of poetic technique.
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In a radio interview, Larkin defended his liking for Hardy’s temperament and way of seeing life: ‘He’s not a transcendental writer, he’s not a Yeats, he’s not an Eliot; his subjects are men, the life of men, time and the passing of time, love and the fading of love’.
Larkin freely acknowledges the influence on him of Hardy’s verse, which results in his rejection of Yeats as a poetic model.

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It is a similar kind of response that gave rise to an important study by Donald Davie (1973). Davie feels that ‘in British poetry of the last fifty years (as not in America) the most far-reaching influence, for good or ill, has been not Yeats, still less Eliot or Pound, not Lawrence, but Hardy’, and that this influence has been deleterious.”
Geoffrey Harvey, Thomas Hardy



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