Brian D. McLaren's Blog, page 5

May 8, 2016

On a day off, you may find my friend Jeffrey Olrick and me paddling our kayaks in the waters of Southwest Florida where we live. Jeffrey wrote the following after a recent outing:



The Book of Genesis declares that we are made for this earth to "work and care" for it. I am thinking about these words as I return from the water. The water, for me, is my place of recovery. A refuge. Four days a week I do holy work as a therapist. But it's in an office. With a very small window. And I'm an introvert. In the middle of those four work days, on Wednesday, I go to the water to fish in my kayak. Normally, the water feeds my soul.

But today it grieved my soul. The water was barren. Where there should have been acres of seagrass, there was only mud and patches of algae. For those who do not spend their time on the water, such a change in landscape is hard to appreciate. It would be the equivalent of revisiting a mature forest, home to a rich ecosystem of animals big and small, and finding it clearcut with only scrub bushes left behind. And for no reason. Not even a shiny new development to put in its place.



How did this happen in my home of Southwest Florida? The same way that it happens all over this planet every day: powerful corporations have been given the right to "work" the land without in any way "caring" for it.



In our case, three sugar companies receive the bulk of 1 billion in federal loans annually, plus subsidies that cost American taxpayers hundreds of millions annually. (1) Supported in this way, these companies grow sugar on land that is meant to be a flowing sheet of water draining a lake half the size of Rhode Island. During wet periods, excess water backs up in Lake Okeechobee; meanwhile, these companies back-pump polluted waters into the lake from their lands to keep them dry. This brown mess is then redirected to two magnificent estuaries that have no natural connection to the lake, Indian River Lagoon (2) on the east coast of Florida and San Carlos Bay via the Caloosahatchie River (3) on the Southwest coast of Florida. (4)



This winter in south Florida we had the wettest January on record. The resultant flow of water as been above the maximum discharge that the San Carlos and Indian Lagoon estuaries can handle without major ecological damage for over 2 months running.



And so it was, that today I saw what work without care looks like in my little corner of this Creation. There I sat, in my kayak in the middle of San Carlos Bay, floating over an underwater desert where only months earlier had been a vibrant seagrass forest, weeping.



And angry. Time and time again we are told that the value of working the land (without caring for it) is always worth the cost so long as it means jobs and economic activity. But the problem is that we are never given a full accounting of the costs of economic activity, including health costs, or devaluation costs, or environmental costs. When those costs inevitably arrive, they are almost always born by you and me (not to mention our fellow creatures), while the corporations continue to rake in profits. A 2015 Florida Realtors report estimated that the property owners of just one county affected by the last Big O discharge event in 2013 lost 488 million dollars in property value as a result of that single event.(5) When the Comprehensive Everglades Restoration Plan was approved by Congress in 2000 to fix South Florida's version of work without care, the price tag was estimated at 10.5 billion dollars.(6) Big Sugar agreed to pay 320 million of the bill.(7) You and I are left with the rest of the 10 million tag.



So, what costs are you in line to pay to let a few profit by working God's beautiful earth without caring for it? If we don't insist that our elected officials care more diligently on the front end, we will surely be stuck with a bill on the back end that we may or may not be willing or able to afford.



(1)-http://sugarreform.org/unwrapthefacts/

(2)-http://fl.audubon.org/crisis-indian-r...

(3)-https://www.conservancy.org/our-work/...

(4)-http://businessfinancemag.com/busines...

(5)-http://www.floridarealtors.org/Resear...

(6)-https://www.nps.gov/ever/learn/nature...

(7)-http://everglades.fiu.edu/reclaim/tim...



Jeffrey Olrick is a clinical psychologist who lives and works in Southwest Florida with his wife and 3 children. He is an excellent fisherman!

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Published on May 08, 2016 04:53 • 3 views

41. Colleagues: I have great memories of all the people I worked with, from fast food (remember Burger Chef?) and construction (Mop-It & Co, and roofing), to summer camp, to teaching at universities and colleges, and my 24 years at Cedar Ridge. I wish I could have been a better boss to those who worked under me (that was certainly not my strong suit as a pastor), but I am so grateful for every person with whom I've been a colleague, including the amazing people I work with now through publishing, Convergence, and other organizations.



42. Cedar Ridge Community Church: The 24 years I enjoyed as part of this amazing community are so close to my heart. There are no words for my gratitude, especially to Bill & Shobha Duncan who were our companions through it all. I just learned I'll be back for my book tour this fall, which will be such a joy.



43. Long-Term friends: Thinking of CRCC brings so many people to mind ... too many to name, people we may only see occasionally now, but whenever we do, it's like picking up right where we left off. You know who you are, and please know that I thank God for you. (Maybe next year I'll list 61 people I'm most grateful for ...)



44. Forgiveness: When I think of people I've known through the years, I have regrets for those whom I've hurt or disappointed, or been hurt or disappointed or hurt by. But then I think of how forgiveness and grace allow us to let those hurts and disappointments go, and I feel a wave of gratitude for each relationship that struggled because it gave us the opportunity to embody the grace of God to one another. What a gift! Thanks be to God.



45. Critics: My critics (I hope someone will forward this to them!) have meant a lot to me. They helped me see how insecure I was; they kept me on my toes; they challenged me to think deeper and work harder, and they forced me to develop courage and confidence that I never would have developed otherwise. As one of my favorite prayers says, critics are really friends in disguise. How can I not be grateful for them?



46. Literature and Poetry: I remember being a boy and reading "My Side of the Mountain" and "Robinson Crusoe." They woke up my boyhood imagination. Then I remember in high school discovering e.e. cummings, and in college, Theodore Roethke, Sylvia Plath, William Blake, and William Wordsworth. In graduate school came my great literary mentor, Walker Percy. Literature, and especially poetry, have been such a big part of my 60 years of life. I am so grateful. Who would have guessed in those undergraduate Advanced Composition classes that I would become a writer?



47. The Bible: It dawned on me (I know, it's obvious to many people) when I was a graduate student studying literature and critical theory that the Bible was, in fact, great literature. No literature has had the effect on me that the Bible has, especially Genesis, the Four Gospels, and Paul's epistles. Matthew 5-7, John 12-17, Romans 12, and 1 Corinthians 13 have been the most important texts to shape these 60 years. Thanks be to God!



48. Social Media: I started blogging relatively early, and now, adding Facebook and Twitter and more, I realize that social media are so important to me. I'm especially grateful for all the bloggers and tweeters whom I follow, and all who follow me.



49. Writing (and readers): I started journaling in college and writing has been a medium of thinking and reflection for me, not just of communication. I love the whole process ... asking questions, writing furiously fast first drafts, revising and editing, having the courage to dump thousands of words and start over, fine tuning. Of course, I am deeply grateful for all who read what I write!



50. My country. I'm grateful for the USA ... for the beauty of the land, for the people, for our history with all its glory and horror (for inspiration and education). Watching the ugliness that is currently being displayed in our politics makes me all the more grateful for those times when we put our best foot forward. I'm deeply grateful for President Obama, who, I believe, will be shown by history to have been a far greater president (yoked to a far worse Congress) than most people currently realize. I'm sure I'd feel similar gratitude whatever country I was born in, but since I was born in the USA, that's the country I'm especially grateful for.

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Published on May 08, 2016 04:18 • 4 views

May 7, 2016

31. Childhood friends ... I think back to Delayne, Robbie, Paul, Dave, Alan, Bruce, Peter, Rob, Dave, Scott, MaryLou, Gail, and so many more. What great friends to grow up with!



32. Childhood Church ... our family was at church 2 or 3 times a week, and although I remember a lot of boredom, I also gained so much from the singing, preaching, prayer, worship, and fellowship.



33. The Fellowship ... I was part of an amazing group of people in high school who came together through the Jesus Movement. So many of us look back on that experience as one of the greatest blessings of our lives ... more special than we could have realized at the time.



34. Music lessons ... First piano, then violin, then clarinet (which led to sax and flute). Then I picked up the guitar (thanks, Don, for the loaner and first lesson of 5 chords - C, Em, Am, G, and that vexing F). For the bands I was part of (garage and otherwise), including symphonic, marching, and jazz ... I am so grateful.



35. Fishing and fishing buddies. I came across that Thoreau quote recently: "Many men go fishing all of their lives without knowing that it is not fish they are after." From my first fishing trips with my grandmother on a rowboat on Conesus Lake to the great weeks with the Ich-Theology gang (theologians who fly fish for trout in Yellowstone) to my current circle of fishing buddies, I know there are many reasons fishers fish ... a perpetual series of occasions for disappointment (and hope), the development of skill, the game of chance and opportunity, the excuse to be outdoors, the search for something elusive and unseen, the connection to life via a thin thread, the search for a good story to exaggerate, the indulgence in a primal hunting instinct, and more.



36. Wildlife and ecology. I have always loved nature ... first bugs and reptiles and amphibians as a boy, and now, birds and trees and even dragonflies: creation is truly the original Bible, and for me, it is the most direct avenue to worship and communion. I am so grateful for 60 years of living on this beautiful earth, alongside brother tortoise and sister swallow-tailed kite.



37. Music and musicians: James Taylor, Carol King, Joni Mitchell, Chicago, Bob Dylan, Bruce Cockburn, David Wilcox, Jackson Browne, Keith Jarrett, Jodi McLaren and so many other singer-songwriters have enriched my life. I am so thankful to have been on earth at the same time as they are. And then are all the classical composers



38. Making music: I remember learning to improvise on the sax, and feeling that a whole new world was opening up to (and in) me. Around the same time, I began writing songs on piano and guitar. Never has time flowed by so quickly as the times I've been in recording studio, taping (remember tape?) and mixing. Now I can sit at my laptop and have a studio in my living room. What a joy!



39. Worship: Through my Plymouth Brethren heritage, I learned that worship was one of life's greatest joys. That was intensified through the Jesus Movement, the Charismatic Movement, and later, my discovery of liturgy through the Episcopal Church. Music, of course, played a key role in all those experiences ... as did silence, wonder, and awe in the presence of the Mystery we call God, to whom I send all these thanksgivings.



40. Eucharist: Central to my 60 years has been the simple ritual of taking bread and wine in remembrance of and communion with Jesus. I am so grateful for all the ways I have enjoyed the eucharist, from cathedrals to summer camps to communal meals, and especially for the 24 years I was privileged to help lead in the eucharist at Cedar Ridge Community Church.





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Published on May 07, 2016 04:43 • 2 views

May 6, 2016

21. Nieces and Nephews and other extended family ... each a gift who mean more to me as I get older.



22. Averie ... our first grandchild, radiant with exuberance and joy.



23. Mia ... our second grandchild, a sweet and gentle soul.



24. Ella ... our third grandchild, a well of creativity.



25. Lucas ... our fourth grandchild, my littlest pal.



26. Granddaughter number five ... whom we'll meet this summer!



27. Thinking of my grandchildren, I think of my own childhood: holidays, vacations, summer camps, pets, playmates ... skateboarding, exploring the woods and swamps, catching all manner of creatures, playing hide and seek and soccer, reading great books, enjoying wonderful friends.



28. Thinking of my childhood, I think of the great education I received ... wonderful teachers from kindergarten through graduate school. People often complain about public schools, but I am so grateful for my public school and state university education. I wouldn't trade them for anything.



29. Then there's my spiritual education ... learning from sermons, Sunday School classes, family devotions (which I constantly complained about, but benefitted from nonetheless), and later, mentors.



30. Speaking of my mentors ... from Dave to Rod to Tom to Stan to Dallas to Marcus to Phyllis and many more, I have been blessed with encouragers a few years to a few decades older than me. They inspire me to want to do the same for others, all the more in the decade ahead.



More tomorrow ...

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Published on May 06, 2016 04:33 • 1 view

21. Nieces and Nephews and other extended family ... each a gift who mean more to me as I get older.



22. Averie ... our first grandchild, radiant with exuberance and joy.



23. Mia ... our second grandchild, a sweet and gentle soul.



24. Ella ... our third grandchild, a well of creativity.



25. Lucas ... our fourth grandchild, my littlest pal.



26. Granddaughter number five ... whom we'll meet this summer!



27. Thinking of my grandchildren, I think of my own childhood: holidays, vacations, summer camps, pets, playmates ... skateboarding, exploring the woods and swamps, catching all manner of creatures, playing hide and seek and soccer, reading great books, enjoying wonderful friends.



28. Thinking of my childhood, I think of the great education I received ... wonderful teachers from kindergarten through graduate school. People often complain about public schools, but I am so grateful for my public school and state university education. I wouldn't trade them for anything.



29. Then there's my spiritual education ... learning from sermons, Sunday School classes, family devotions (which I constantly complained about, but benefitted from nonetheless), and later, mentors.



30. Speaking of my mentors ... from Dave to Rod to Tom to Stan to Dallas to Marcus to Phyllis and many more, I have been blessed with encouragers a few years to a few decades older than me. They inspire me to want to do the same for others, all the more in the decade ahead.



More tomorrow ...

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Published on May 06, 2016 04:33 • 3 views

My friend Mark Charles explains the mistake here:

http://wirelesshogan.blogspot.com/2016/04/hillary-clinton-off-the-reservation.html



The opportunity, to admit the mistake, learn from it, and address the underlying reality of America's unaddressed injustice towards the original inhabitants of this land, so this will no longer be true:

Unfortunately, the dialogue that is taking place this election cycle is not about broad-based equality or ending racism. The conversation we are having today is about the type of racism we want to settle for. "Do we want Hillary Clinton to work to keep racism as our nation���s implicit bias; or allow Donald Trump to champion racism as our explicit bias?"

After all, isn't building a wall, banning Muslims, and personally funding a presidential campaign with a fortune made by buying and selling land that has been ethnically cleansed, merely the fruit of a country that has learned all too well how to deal with the ���merciless Indian savages��� who sometimes get "off the reservation"?

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Published on May 06, 2016 04:12 • 1 view

May 5, 2016

11. My mom is alive and well, healthy and full of cheerfulness and kindness at 89. We get to see her almost every day, and I can't begin to express how grateful I am for a mother so full of love, encouragement, and warmth. I can't imagine what life would have been like without her. Well ... I wouldn't be here, for one!



12. Of all the people I've ever known, my brother Peter is among those I respect the most. As a kid, he had to put up with a big brother who way too often teased him and way too seldom appreciated him. But now, older, whenever I think of my brother, I am inspired by his great heart, hard work, and solid character ... not to mention his superior golf game.



13. Grace. We'll celebrate 37 years of marriage in a couple months, and I'm really impressed with how two people who are so different (ENTP, INFJ) could make such a great team ... raising amazing kids, helping start a wonderful church, supporting one another in so many projects and adventures, and being good to each other through all life's ups and downs. I couldn't be more grateful for Grace as my partner in life.



14. Rachel: The only thing better than having Rachel as a daughter is seeing her thrive as a mom. I feel like she's not just one of my kids; she's a great friend.



15. Brett: The only thing better than having Brett as a son is seeing him thrive as a dad. And I feel like he's not just one of my kids; he's a great friend.



16. Trevor: As a child, Trevor became known as a cancer survivor. Now, as an adult, he is a phenomenal human being who brings a smile to my face and warmth to my heart whenever I think of him.



17. Jodi: We share so many things ... a love for music, a love for good literature, a love for the outdoors. One of the highlights of my sabbatical was having her invite me to come out west and teach her to fly fish ... something new to have in common.



18. My kids' spouses ... Jesse, Breana, and Owen are as much a part of our family as our biological children, and I am so grateful for each of them.



19. In-Laws: I think of how much my brothers- and sisters-in-law have meant in my life over these 60 years ...



20. Cousins/Aunts & Uncles: I think of the great blessing of extended family ... from shared vacations to family reunions years ago, and now, to rare and special chances to reconnect (often at a memorial service to honor and celebrate the generation that is passing).



More tomorrow ...

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Published on May 05, 2016 04:14 • 1 view

11. My mom is alive and well, healthy and full of cheerfulness and kindness at 89. We get to see her almost every day, and I can't begin to express how grateful I am for a mother so full of love, encouragement, and warmth. I can't imagine what life would have been like without her. Well ... I wouldn't be here, for one!



12. Of all the people I've ever known, my brother Peter is among those I respect the most. As a kid, he had to put up with a big brother who way too often teased him and way too seldom appreciated him. But now, older, whenever I think of my brother, I am inspired by his great heart, hard work, and solid character ... not to mention his superior golf game.



13. Grace. We'll celebrate 37 years of marriage in a couple months, and I'm really impressed with how two people who are so different (ENTP, INFJ) could make such a great team ... raising amazing kids, helping start a wonderful church, supporting one another in so many projects and adventures, and being good to each other through all life's ups and downs. I couldn't be more grateful for Grace as my partner in life.



14. Rachel: The only thing better than having Rachel as a daughter is seeing her thrive as a mom. I feel like she's not just one of my kids; she's a great friend.



15. Brett: The only thing better than having Brett as a son is seeing him thrive as a dad. And I feel like he's not just one of my kids; he's a great friend.



16. Trevor: As a child, Trevor became known as a cancer survivor. Now, as an adult, he is a phenomenal human being who brings a smile to my face and warmth to my heart whenever I think of him.



17. Jodi: We share so many things ... a love for music, a love for good literature, a love for the outdoors. One of the highlights of my sabbatical was having her invite me to come out west and teach her to fly fish ... something new to have in common.



18. My kids' spouses ... Jesse, Breana, and Owen are as much a part of our family as our biological children, and I am so grateful for each of them.



19. In-Laws: I think of how much my brothers- and sisters-in-law have meant in my life over these 60 years ...



20. Cousins/Aunts & Uncles: I think of the great blessing of extended family ... from shared vacations to family reunions years ago, and now, to rare and special chances to reconnect (often at a memorial service to honor and celebrate the generation that is passing).



More tomorrow ...

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Published on May 05, 2016 04:14 • 4 views

May 4, 2016

As many of you know, I've been on a sabbatical coinciding with my 60th birthday, which is today (May the Fourth Be With You!). This has been a rich, rich time of looking back (with gratitude), looking within (for greater self-understanding), looking up and around (for guidance), and looking ahead (with anticipation).



A while back, I got an idea for a new practice: each year, to write a list of things I'm grateful for ... one for each year. The idea was to do this spontaneously, stream-of-consciousness. (For my very-very spiritual friends, I intentionally decided not to put God, faith, etc., first, but to see where these elements of gratitude came up in my list spontaneously.)



Here's my list, just as it flowed. I'll post ten per day.



1. The gift of life. I've been given 21,900 days, 525,600 hours, and 3,120 weeks. How many breaths? How many heartbeats? How many mornings to awaken, and nights to sleep? Each day, each breath, each moment is a great gift. Thanks be to God.



2. The gift of good health. I survived three illnesses that, had I been born 100 years ago, would have killed me (appendicitis, 2 simultaneous tick-borne diseases that affected my liver and heart, and melanoma), not to count all the other ways I could have kicked the bucket early. The fact that at 60 I feel absolutely great ... Thanks be to God.



3. The gift of clean air to breathe. I've spent time in cities where the smog was thick, and I am so grateful that each morning I can step outside and take a deep breath of clean air. Thanks be to God.



4. Clean water to drink ... I realize that 750+ million people don't, and this is a great blessing which makes me want to help everyone everywhere have access to clean, safe drinking water.



5. Great food to eat ... I remember my mom's home cooking and all the great Italian meals Grace and I have shared. I also think of my favorite kinds of cuisine ... Thai, Mexican, Chinese, Cambodian, Indian, Vietnamese, Middle Eastern ... And then there's my dietary nemesis: tortilla chips and fire roasted salsa. I think of wonderful meals I've enjoyed around the world, from Costa Rica to Burundi, from Sweden to New Zealand.



6. Sanitation and Health Care ... to have a toilet is a blessing 2.5 million people don't have. And to have access to good medical and dental care ... I am blessed indeed.



7. Good Faith: I was born into a Christian family, and I became a committed Christian by choice as well as by heritage ... but I eventually learned that for some people, their faith does them more harm than good. So I am grateful that I've been guided into an understanding of God and faith that have been a doorway into greater life and freedom rather than a passage into a prison cell, and I'm grateful that my only options weren't fundamentalism or faithlessness.



8. Homes: I think back on all the homes I've lived in. As a child and teenager, I lived in Olean, NY; Rockford, IL; Caroga Lake and Johnstown, NY; Kensington, MD; and Rockville, MD ... and I have wonderful memories of each home. When I got married, Grace and I rented and apartment in College Park, MD; then bought our first home in Riverdale, MD, then moved to another place in Riverdale, and then moved to Laurel, and then here to Marco Island, FL. When 60 million people in the world are refugees or displaced, I think of what a blessing it is simply to be safe and at home.



9. Neighbors and Neighborhoods: My parents taught me to appreciate the value of neighbors and I think about how my neighborhoods have shaped me ... from gaining a love of nature in Olean, NY, to the amazing educational opportunities of growing up in Maryland with its great schools, and now, to living between the Everglades and the Gulf of Mexico. I am thankful for neighborhoods of racial, religious, and ethnic diversity ... and for folks who watch out for each other.



10. My dad. He died two years ago, leaving me a huge fulness rather than emptiness ... He filled me with encouragement, curiosity, energy, a strong work ethic, strict (in the best sense) morals, a deep faith, and a restless hunger for adventure and experience. Even his quirks and weaknesses brought great blessing to me. I can't say enough about how grateful I am for him; I only hope I will leave a similar fulness in my kids' lives.



(More tomorrow)

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Published on May 04, 2016 04:42 • 1 view

As many of you know, I've been on a sabbatical coinciding with my 60th birthday, which is today (May the Fourth Be With You!). This has been a rich, rich time of looking back (with gratitude), looking within (for greater self-understanding), looking up and around (for guidance), and looking ahead (with anticipation).



A while back, I got an idea for a new practice: each year, to write a list of things I'm grateful for ... one for each year. The idea was to do this spontaneously, stream-of-consciousness. (For my very-very spiritual friends, I intentionally decided not to put God, faith, etc., first, but to see where these elements of gratitude came up in my list spontaneously.)



Here's my list, just as it flowed. I'll post ten per day.



1. The gift of life. I've been given 21,900 days, 525,600 hours, and 3,120 weeks. How many breaths? How many heartbeats? How many mornings to awaken, and nights to sleep? Each day, each breath, each moment is a great gift. Thanks be to God.



2. The gift of good health. I survived three illnesses that, had I been born 100 years ago, would have killed me (appendicitis, 2 simultaneous tick-borne diseases that affected my liver and heart, and melanoma), not to count all the other ways I could have kicked the bucket early. The fact that at 60 I feel absolutely great ... Thanks be to God.



3. The gift of clean air to breathe. I've spent time in cities where the smog was thick, and I am so grateful that each morning I can step outside and take a deep breath of clean air. Thanks be to God.



4. Clean water to drink ... I realize that 750+ million people don't, and this is a great blessing which makes me want to help everyone everywhere have access to clean, safe drinking water.



5. Great food to eat ... I remember my mom's home cooking and all the great Italian meals Grace and I have shared. I also think of my favorite kinds of cuisine ... Thai, Mexican, Chinese, Cambodian, Indian, Vietnamese, Middle Eastern ... And then there's my dietary nemesis: tortilla chips and fire roasted salsa. I think of wonderful meals I've enjoyed around the world, from Costa Rica to Burundi, from Sweden to New Zealand.



6. Sanitation and Health Care ... to have a toilet is a blessing 2.5 million people don't have. And to have access to good medical and dental care ... I am blessed indeed.



7. Good Faith: I was born into a Christian family, and I became a committed Christian by choice as well as by heritage ... but I eventually learned that for some people, their faith does them more harm than good. So I am grateful that I've been guided into an understanding of God and faith that have been a doorway into greater life and freedom rather than a passage into a prison cell, and I'm grateful that my only options weren't fundamentalism or faithlessness.



8. Homes: I think back on all the homes I've lived in. As a child and teenager, I lived in Olean, NY; Rockford, IL; Caroga Lake and Johnstown, NY; Kensington, MD; and Rockville, MD ... and I have wonderful memories of each home. When I got married, Grace and I rented and apartment in College Park, MD; then bought our first home in Riverdale, MD, then moved to another place in Riverdale, and then moved to Laurel, and then here to Marco Island, FL. When 60 million people in the world are refugees or displaced, I think of what a blessing it is simply to be safe and at home.



9. Neighbors and Neighborhoods: My parents taught me to appreciate the value of neighbors and I think about how my neighborhoods have shaped me ... from gaining a love of nature in Olean, NY, to the amazing educational opportunities of growing up in Maryland with its great schools, and now, to living between the Everglades and the Gulf of Mexico. I am thankful for neighborhoods of racial, religious, and ethnic diversity ... and for folks who watch out for each other.



10. My dad. He died two years ago, leaving me a huge fulness rather than emptiness ... He filled me with encouragement, curiosity, energy, a strong work ethic, strict (in the best sense) morals, a deep faith, and a restless hunger for adventure and experience. Even his quirks and weaknesses brought great blessing to me. I can't say enough about how grateful I am for him; I only hope I will leave a similar fulness in my kids' lives.



(More tomorrow)

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Published on May 04, 2016 04:42 • 4 views

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