Bernice Glatzer Rosenthal





Bernice Glatzer Rosenthal



Average rating: 4.00 · 30 ratings · 2 reviews · 10 distinct works · Similar authors
The Occult in Russian and S...

4.10 avg rating — 20 ratings — published 1997 — 2 editions
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Time, Tense, and Reference

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really liked it 4.00 avg rating — 3 ratings — published 2003 — 2 editions
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Nietzsche In Russia

3.33 avg rating — 3 ratings — published 1986 — 2 editions
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New Myth, New World: From N...

3.67 avg rating — 3 ratings — published 2000 — 2 editions
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Nietzsche and Soviet Culture

it was amazing 5.00 avg rating — 1 rating — published 1994
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Dmitri Sergeevich Merezhkov...

0.00 avg rating — 0 ratings — published 2012
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Dmitri Sergeevich Merezhkov...

0.00 avg rating — 0 ratings — published 1975
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Nietzsche and Soviet Cultur...

0.00 avg rating — 0 ratings — published 2010
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Dmitri Sergeevitch Merezhko...

0.00 avg rating — 0 ratings — published 1975
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The New Age of Russia: Occu...

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0.00 avg rating — 0 ratings — published 2012
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“Bolshevik intellectuals did not confine their reading to Marxist works. They knew Russian and European literature and philosophy and kept up with current trends in art and thoughts. Aspects of Nietzsche’s thought were either surprisingly compatible with Marxism or treated issues that Marx and Engels had neglected. Nietzsche sensitized Bolsheviks committed to reason and science to the importance of the nonrational aspects of the human psyche and to the psychpolitical utility of symbol, myth, and cult. His visions of “great politics” (grosse Politik) colored their imaginations. Politik, like the Russian word politika, means both “politics” and “policy”; grosse has also been translated as “grand” or “large scale.” The Soviet obsession with creating a new culture stemmed primarily from Nietzsche, Wagner, and their Russian popularizers. Marx and Engels never developed a detailed theory of culture because they considered it part of the superstructure that would change to follow changes in the economic base.”
Bernice Glatzer Rosenthal, New Myth, New World: From Nietzsche to Stalinism



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