Austen Ivereigh





Austen Ivereigh


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Austen Ivereigh is a British writer, journalist, and commentator on religious and political affairs who holds a PhD from Oxford University. His work appears regularly in the Jesuit magazine America and in many other periodicals. He is well known on British media, especially on the BBC, Sky, ITV and Al-Jazeera, as a Catholic commentator.

Average rating: 4.12 · 380 ratings · 71 reviews · 15 distinct works · Similar authors
The Great Reformer: Francis...

4.14 avg rating — 291 ratings — published 2014 — 15 editions
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How to Defend the Faith Wit...

really liked it 4.00 avg rating — 82 ratings — published 2012 — 5 editions
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How to Defend the Faith Wit...

4.50 avg rating — 4 ratings — published 2015
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How to Defend the Faith wit...

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4.67 avg rating — 3 ratings — published 2015
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Faithful Citizens: A Practi...

0.00 avg rating — 0 ratings — published 2010
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Unfinished Journey: The Chu...

0.00 avg rating — 0 ratings — published 2003 — 3 editions
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Cómo defender la fe sin lev...

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How to Defend the Faith Wit...

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Come difendere la fede (sen...

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Come difendere la fede

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“The accusation against the Church for being either right or left wing tells you more about the contemporary political assumptions than about the political inclination of Catholicism. The Church will seem both "right wing" (in promoting the traditional family, opposing abortion, euthanasia, embryonic research, etc.) and "left wing" (in advocating the rights of minorities, social justice, active state support for the poorest, etc.), depending on the political bias of the one accusing .The same bias afflicts Catholics. There are pro-life Catholics who think Catholic social teaching is "socialist," and pro-social-justice Catholics who think pro-life causes are right wing.

The Church will always be accused of "interfering" or trying to "impose" its view when the critic disagrees with its stance; but the same critic will say nothing when the Church has intervened politically on a matter with which he or she agrees. And if the Church has stayed silent, the critic will accuse it of "failing to speak out." Put another way, people are against the Church "interfering" in what they would much rather have left alone; and in favor of "interfering" in what they believe should be changed.

Why and when does the Church speak out on political questions? The answer is rarely and cautiously, and almost always because it is a matter which touches on the Gospel, on core freedoms and rights (such as the right to life, or to religious freedom), or on core principles of Catholic social teaching. In these cases, the Church not only needs to speak out; it has a duty to do so.”
Austen Ivereigh, How to Defend the Faith Without Raising Your Voice: Civil Responses to Catholic Hot-Button Issues

“Bergoglio has always been convinced of the vital importance of grandparents—and especially the grandmother—as guardians of a precious reserve parents often ignore or reject. “I was lucky to know my four grandparents,” he recalled in 2011. “The wisdom of the elderly has helped me greatly; that is why I venerate them.” In 2012 he told Father Isasmendi on the community radio of the Villa 21 shantytown: The grandmother is in the hearth, the grandfather, too, but above all the grandmother; she’s like the reserve. She’s the moral, religious, and cultural reserve. She’s the one who passes on the whole story. Mom and Dad are over there, working, engaged in this and that, they’ve got a thousand things to do. The grandmother is in the house more; the grandfather, too. They tell you things from before. My grandfather used to tell me stories about the 1914 war, stories they lived through. They tell you about life as they lived it, not stories from books, but their own stories, of their own lives. That’s what I’d like to say to the grandparents listening. Tell them things about life, so the kids know what life is.”
Austen Ivereigh, The Great Reformer: Francis and the Making of a Radical Pope

“as they lived it, not stories from books, but their”
Austen Ivereigh, The Great Reformer: Francis and the Making of a Radical Pope

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Reading Along Wit...: Austen Ivereigh, "The Great Reformer: Francis and the Making of a Radical Pope" 1 2 Jan 05, 2015 05:45AM  


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