Aleksander Wat





Aleksander Wat

Author profile


born
in Warsaw, Poland
December 13, 1901

died
July 29, 1967

gender
male

genre


About this author

Aleksander Wat, (born Aleksander Chwat to a Jewish father and a Polish mother) was a Polish poet, writer and art theoretician, one of the precursors of Polish futurism movement in early 1920s.

In 1919 he was among the young poets to proclaim the advent of new, futuristic poetry. The following year he published the first set of his poems, which gained much popularity among the supporters of the new trends in literature of the epoch. Until 1922 he was one of the creators of the Nowa Sztuka ("New Art") monthly, and then Almanachy Nowej Sztuki and Miesięcznik literacki. Initially a Communist, until 1931 he was also one of the main journalists of the Marxist Tygodnik literacki.


Average rating: 4.18 · 193 ratings · 12 reviews · 15 distinct works · Similar authors
My Century
by
4.37 of 5 stars 4.37 avg rating — 60 ratings — published 1977 — 15 editions
Rate this book
Clear rating
Lucifer Unemployed
by
4.0 of 5 stars 4.00 avg rating — 30 ratings — published 1927 — 4 editions
Rate this book
Clear rating
Selected Poems
4.5 of 5 stars 4.50 avg rating — 2 ratings
Rate this book
Clear rating
Mediterranean Poems
5.0 of 5 stars 5.00 avg rating — 1 rating — published 1977
Rate this book
Clear rating
Poezje zebrane
4.0 of 5 stars 4.00 avg rating — 1 rating — published 1992
Rate this book
Clear rating
Świat na haku i pod kluczem...
4.0 of 5 stars 4.00 avg rating — 1 rating
Rate this book
Clear rating
L'ebreo Errante
2.0 of 5 stars 2.00 avg rating — 1 rating — published 1995
Rate this book
Clear rating
Korespondencja t.1
1.0 of 5 stars 1.00 avg rating — 1 rating — published 2005
Rate this book
Clear rating
Jenseits von Wahrheit und L...
0.0 of 5 stars 0.00 avg rating — 0 ratings
Rate this book
Clear rating
Poezja polska. Antologia
by
3.33 of 5 stars 3.33 avg rating — 6 ratings — published 2000
Rate this book
Clear rating
More books by Aleksander Wat…
“But my life, oh, my life, had been a constant search for an enormous dream in which my fellow creatures and animals, plants, chimeras, stars, and minerals were in a pre-established harmony, a dream that is forgotten because it must be forgotten, and is sought desperately, and only sporadically does one find its tragic fragments in the warmth of a person, in some specific situation, a glance - in memory too, of course, in some specific pain, some moment. I loved that harmony with a passion; I loved it in voices, voices. And then, instead of harmony, there was nothing but scraps and tatters. And perhaps that alone is what it means to be a poet.”
Aleksander Wat