Dorothy Canfield Fisher





Dorothy Canfield Fisher

Author profile


born
in Lawrence, Kansas, The United States
February 17, 1879

died
November 09, 1958

gender
female

genre


About this author

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Average rating: 4.08 · 5,485 ratings · 465 reviews · 54 distinct works · Similar authors
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Our Independence and the Co...
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The Deepening Stream
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More books by Dorothy Canfield Fisher…
“If we would give, just once, the same amount of reflection to what we want out of life that we give to the question of what to do with a two weeks’ vacation, we would be startled at our false standards and the aimless procession of our busy days.”
Dorothy Canfield Fisher

“...there are two ways to meet life; you may refuse to care until indifference becomes a habit, a defensive armor, and you are safe - but bored. Or you can care greatly, live greatly, until life breaks you on its wheel. ”
Dorothy Canfield Fisher

“It is not good for all our wishes to be filled; through sickness we recognize the value of health; through evil, the value of good; through hunger, the value of food; through exertion, the value of rest.”
Dorothy Canfield Fisher

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