Kevin  Egan




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Kevin Egan

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Born
in White Plains, The United States
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Member Since
February 2013


Kevin Egan graduated with a B.A. in English from Cornell University, where he studied creative writing under Dan McCall (Jack the Bear) and Robert Morgan (Gap Creek). He is the author of seven novels, with his eighth, A Shattered Circle, to be published by Forge in March, 2017. The first installment in his current legal thriller series, Midnight, was named a Best Book of 2013 by Kirkus Reviews.

His first novel, The Perseus Breed, combined a science fiction story-line with strong mystery genre elements. In the book, Borley Share’s obsessive quest to understand the sudden disappearance of his first serious girlfriend uncovers the existence of an alien race using the Earth as a nursery to raise its young.

Writing as Conor Daly, he published a
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Kevin Egan In my mind, the best thing is the feeling I get when I have been working an idea for awhile and the story suddenly clicks. It gives me the illusion…moreIn my mind, the best thing is the feeling I get when I have been working an idea for awhile and the story suddenly clicks. It gives me the illusion that I know what I’m doing. (less)
Kevin Egan Mr. Bridge and Mrs. Bridge are my favorite fictional couple. In two novels, written nine years apart, Evan S. Connell examines their lives first from…moreMr. Bridge and Mrs. Bridge are my favorite fictional couple. In two novels, written nine years apart, Evan S. Connell examines their lives first from Mrs. Bridge’s point of view and then from Mr. Bridge’s point of view. The effect is not a Rashomon-style exercise of depicting the same events as experienced by two different people. Instead, we see their marriage and their lives in an upper-middle class suburb of Kansas City in the years between the two world wars through each of their eyes. The implicit question throughout both novels is whether these two people love each other. The answer, apparent at the end of Mr. Bridge’s story, is yes. (less)
Average rating: 3.51 · 145 ratings · 37 reviews · 5 distinct works · Similar authors
Midnight

3.23 avg rating — 73 ratings — published 2013 — 3 editions
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The Missing Piece

3.46 avg rating — 24 ratings — published 2015 — 3 editions
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A Shattered Circle

3.42 avg rating — 12 ratings3 editions
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The Perseus Breed

liked it 3.00 avg rating — 7 ratings — published 2014 — 2 editions
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THUGLIT Issue Thirteen

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4.41 avg rating — 29 ratings — published 2014 — 2 editions
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More books by Kevin Egan…
In the summer of 1985, I saw the movie Back to the Future. The scene that resonated with me most involved neither Marty McFly nor Dr. Emmett Brown, but focused on George McFly, Marty’s dad. George had been depicted during most of the movie as a high school nerd who was the butt of practical jokes played by the cooler, more athletic kids in his class. But in this scene, toward the end of the mov... Read more of this blog post »
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Published on March 12, 2017 16:51 • 2 views

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" Today we're talking about Kevin Egan's new legal thriller, A Shattered Circle. This is his eighth novel and his third thriller. He used to work in the New York County Courthouse, which is how he knows so much about lawyers and judges. Kevin’s ..." Read more of this blog post »
" Tonight's episode of Major Crimes, called 'Clear History,' is a little on the dark side, according to Adam Belanoff who wrote the story. Adam serves as executive producer for Major Crimes, is here today answering questions. Adam has written fo..." Read more of this blog post »
Kevin Egan finished reading
Lion Plays Rough by Lachlan Smith
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I'll See You in Paris by Michelle Gable
" Try an Alan Furst novel. They all take place during the run-up or early months of WWII. Most are set in Paris. "
Kevin Egan finished reading
This Side of Paradise by F. Scott Fitzgerald
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Kevin Egan wants to read
Fresh Slices by Terrie Farley Moran
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Fresh Slices by Terrie Farley Moran
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A Hero of France by Alan Furst
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At Bouchercon 2013 I picked up an advance reading copy of Mission to Paris. A few weeks later, needing something to read on the train, I grabbed the book of the shelf. I never had read any of Alan Furst's books before. Three pages in, I was enthralle ...more
More of Kevin's books…
Ernest Hemingway
“It is awfully easy to be hard-boiled about everything in the daytime, but at night it is another thing.”
Ernest Hemingway, The Sun Also Rises

Clark Blaise
“Art, she said, is more nuanced than life. If a teacher is lecturing and looking out of smudged windows, smeared with obscenities (sure enough, ours were) it doesn't mean anything, in life, except that the cleaning crews are lazy. But in a story, if a professor is lecturing and the windows are smudged, we are obliged to think that his words are similarly untrandescent, right? ...
One of the great problems with artists, she said, is that they don't keep nuance and nature distinct. Import raw nature into a story or a poem and you've only ruined a story. Import nuance into life and you'll go mad. There'll suddenly be too much significance everywhere, a message in everything.”
Clark Blaise

W.B. Yeats
“The best lack all conviction, while the worst are full of passionate intensity.”
W.B. Yeats, The Collected Poems of W.B. Yeats

Jim Harrison
“As an English major I was familiar with the stories of dozens of writers trying to get their work done among the multifarious diversions of the world and the hurdles of their own vices. A professor had said that what saved writers is that they, like politicians, had the illusion of destiny that allowed them to overcome obstacles no matter how nominal their work.”
Jim Harrison, The English Major




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