Linda Greenhouse





Linda Greenhouse


Born
in New York City, The United States
January 09, 1947


Linda Greenhouse isn't a Goodreads Author (yet), but she does have a blog, so here are some recent posts imported from her feed.
An appeal in Oklahoma has drawn little attention, but at issue is the Supreme Court’s own unstable abortion doctrine.
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Published on September 04, 2013 18:00 • 176 views
Average rating: 4.00 · 1,029 ratings · 106 reviews · 6 distinct works · Similar authors
Becoming Justice Blackmun: ...

4.03 avg rating — 860 ratings — published 2005 — 5 editions
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The U.S. Supreme Court: A V...

3.84 avg rating — 106 ratings — published 2012 — 3 editions
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Before Roe v. Wade: Voices ...

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3.75 avg rating — 56 ratings — published 2010 — 5 editions
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Daedalus 143:3 (Summer 2014...

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0.00 avg rating — 0 ratings — published 2014
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The Burger Court and the Ri...

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4.14 avg rating — 7 ratings3 editions
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Daedalus 141:4 (Fall 2012) ...

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“In fact, only six days later, with Chief Justice Marshall not participating, the Court avoided a possible constitutional confrontation. Voting 5–0 in Stuart v. Laird (1803), the justices upheld Congress’s repeal of the Judiciary Act of 1801, a move some historians see as reflecting the Court’s unwillingness to test the full dimensions of the power it had just claimed for itself. More than half a century would pass before the Supreme Court again declared an act of Congress unconstitutional. That was the Dred Scott decision of 1857 (Scott v. Sandford), invalidating the Missouri Compromise and holding that Congress lacked authority to abolish slavery in the territories. That notorious decision, a step on the road to the Civil War, was perhaps not the best advertisement for judicial review. But since then, the Court has lost its early reticence. It has declared acts of Congress unconstitutional more than 150 times.”
Linda Greenhouse, The U.S. Supreme Court:A Very Short Introduction

“The political scientist Robert A. Dahl observed more than a half century ago that the Supreme Court “is an essential part of the political leadership,” part of the “dominant political alliance.”
Linda Greenhouse, The U.S. Supreme Court:A Very Short Introduction

“The Constitutional Convention quickly agreed to the proposal of Governor Edmund Randolph of Virginia for a national government of three branches: legislative, executive, and judicial. Randolph’s resolution “that a national Judiciary be established” passed unanimously. Debating and defining the powers of Congress in Article I and of the president in Article II consumed much of the delegates’ attention and energy. Central provisions of Article III were the product of compromise and, in its fewer than five hundred words, the article left important questions unresolved. Lacking agreement on a role for lower courts, for example, the delegates simply left it to Congress to decide how to structure them. The number of justices remained unspecified. Article III itself makes no reference to the office of chief justice, to whom the Constitution (in Article I) assigns only one specific duty, that of presiding over a Senate trial in a presidential impeachment.”
Linda Greenhouse, The U.S. Supreme Court:A Very Short Introduction

Topics Mentioning This Author

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Goodreads Feedback: book link issue using add book/author feature 20 116 Jan 18, 2012 10:30AM  
The History Book ...: ALISA'S 50 BOOKS READ IN 2012 30 73 Sep 30, 2012 05:22PM  
The History Book ...: #98 - ASSOCIATE JUSTICE HARRY BLACKMUN 12 163 Sep 24, 2015 10:39AM  
The History Book ...: * SUPREME COURT OF THE UNITED STATES 786 440 Mar 18, 2016 01:36PM  


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