Peter Macinnis

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Peter Macinnis

Goodreads Author


Born
in Australia
Website

Twitter

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Influences
Peter Mason, Henry Lawson, Peter Medawar, J B S Haldane, Rudyard Kipli ...more

Member Since
March 2008


Happy grandfather, travels, writes for adults and youngsters, mainly history or science. Published by the National Library of Australia (Australian Backyard Naturalist May 2012, another book Curious Minds October, 2012, Big Book of Australian History, 2013). Talks on ABC (RN), translated into 7 other languages. Winner of the W.A. Premier's Prize for Children's Literature 2013 and other awards.

Writing blog Old Writer on the Block. Google it and say g'day!

McManly on most social media. His Kokoda Track: 101 Days was a 2008 Eve Pownall Honour Book in the CBCA 'Book of the Year' awards. His Australian Backyard Explorer was the 2010 Eve Pownall Book of the Year (listed in 2011, in the prestigious international White Ravens list of children's lite
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Peter Macinnis My best answer to this comes from the start of a book that is currently in page-proof:

"Some of the books I write happen because somebody asked me to…more
My best answer to this comes from the start of a book that is currently in page-proof:

"Some of the books I write happen because somebody asked me to write them. Those are always fun, but my favourite books are the ones that begin as an itch of curiosity which becomes a temporary obsession that erupts into an essay which later balloons out into a whole book."

I would say that on balance, more than 80% of my books come from temporary obsessions — but the other 20% are the most successful. If I wanted just to make money, I would eschew self-indulgence, and just do as I am told. Fat chance!(less)
Average rating: 3.56 · 428 ratings · 86 reviews · 39 distinct works · Similar authors
Poisons: From Hemlock to Bo...

3.46 avg rating — 267 ratings — published 2011 — 8 editions
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Bittersweet: The Story of S...

3.63 avg rating — 79 ratings — published 2002 — 6 editions
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Mr Darwin's Incredible Shri...

3.33 avg rating — 15 ratings — published 2008 — 3 editions
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The Killer Bean Of Calabar ...

3.75 avg rating — 12 ratings — published 2004 — 5 editions
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Kokoda Track: 101 Days

really liked it 4.00 avg rating — 11 ratings — published 2007 — 2 editions
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Australian Backyard Explorer

4.38 avg rating — 8 ratings — published 2009
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Rockets: Sulfur, Sputnik an...

3.86 avg rating — 7 ratings — published 2003 — 4 editions
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The Big Book of Australian ...

4.60 avg rating — 5 ratings — published 2013 — 2 editions
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Australia's Pioneers, Heroe...

3.60 avg rating — 5 ratings — published 2007
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100 Discoveries: The Greate...

3.33 avg rating — 6 ratings — published 2008 — 4 editions
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More books by Peter Macinnis…
Yesterday, I spent an exhilarating morning at the local Catholic primary school, talking to and then working with a select bunch of talented young writers (ages 11-12), drawn from Sydney'e northern beaches area.

Old fogeys who mumble about falling standards and the younger generation have their heads up their whatnots. I met and read the work of one youngster who will be winning major prizes in... Read more of this blog post »
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Published on September 02, 2011 16:08 • 195 views

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Descants (Nonfiction)
1 chapters   —   updated Mar 29, 2010 04:33PM
Description: Short pieces (I aim at about 700 words a time) on the origins and mutated meanings of certain interesting words. I have about half a book, and I return to fossick around the outlines every now and then.
The Long War
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The Emperor of Al...
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The Geneva Trap
Peter Macinnis rated a book liked it
read in December, 2013
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Peter Macinnis Peter Macinnis said: " A competent enough book, and well worth the read. Not great literature, but good for relaxation, holidays and those confined to bed or the house. "

 

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Peter Macinnis added photos to Peter Macinnis
980487 980485
Peter Macinnis rated a book liked it
Australia in 1866 Australia in 1866 by A. Clergyman
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Morison was, to say the least of it, a distasteful man. Bushranging was, he said, caused by manhood suffrage and democracy, he asserted--and the Chinese were all cheats. That said, he sheds some good light on the use of guns and poison against Aborig ...more
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Career of Evil by Robert Galbraith
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The Silkworm by Robert Galbraith
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Settlers and Convicts, by Alexander Harris
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This was published as fictional, but knowing the era, this is the work of somebody who was actually here, and who probably had most of these experiences. Whoever the author really was, hoorah for him! The book is also available from the University of ...more
Peter Macinnis rated a book it was amazing
The Unnatural Nature of Science by Lewis Wolpert
The Unnatural Nature of Science: Why Science Does Not Make (Common) Sense
by Lewis Wolpert
recommended for: all teachers and students of science
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Why do people persist in trying to square the circle, trisect the angle, run vehicles on water, build perpetual motion machines, deny evolution or attack vaccination?

Aside from being stupid, that is . . . Wolpert's view, with which I agree, is that m
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The Constitution of the United States of America by Founding Fathers
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It might seem odd that an Australian would list this—and if you look at the shelves I have it on, Americans may perceive one apparent inconsistency. Folks, if you see 'odd' or 'inconsistent', you don't know the full story.

Because Britain had (and has
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More of Peter's books…
“There is a remarkably distinctive smell emitted by fearful bureaucrats. It is acrid, rank, and seems to cling to the clothing and the hair. Acting like a pheromone, it drives senior management to form small defensive herds from which to scream homicidally at middle management that they must not tell junior staff who can fix the problem what is going on because everything, including what has just been reported on the radio, is secret.”
Peter Macinnis, Poisons: From Hemlock to Botox and the Killer Bean of Calabar

Topics Mentioning This Author

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The History Book ...: This topic has been closed to new comments. ARCHIVE TWO: PLEASE INTRODUCE YOURSELF ~ 6457 4834 Sep 19, 2015 03:18AM  
The History Book ...: FOOD 138 325 Apr 07, 2016 02:00AM  
“The writer found that certain freshwater crustaceans, namely Californian species of Daphnia, copepods, and Gammarus when indifferent to light can be made intensely positively heliotropic by adding some acid to the fresh water, especially the weak acid CO2. When carbonated water (or beer) to the extent of about 5 c.c. or 10 c.c. is slowly and carefully added to 50 c.c. of fresh water containing these Daphnia, the animals will become intensely positive and will collect in a dense cluster on the window side of the dish. Stronger acids act in the same way but the animals are likely to die quickly. . . Alcohols act in the same way. In the case of Gammarus the positive heliotropism lasts only a few seconds, while in Daphnia it lasts from 10 to 50 minutes and can be renewed by the further careful addition of some CO2.”
Jacques Loeb

“In the circle where I was raised, I knew of no one knowledgeable in the visual arts, no one who regularly attended musical performances, and only two adults other than my teachers who spoke without embarrassment of poetry and literature — both of these being women. As far as I can recall, I never heard a man refer to a good or a great book. I knew no one who had mastered, or even studied, another language from choice. And our articulate, conscious life proceeded without acknowledgement of the preceding civilisations which had produced it.”
Shirley Hazzard

“Science is part of culture. Culture isn't only art and music and literature, it's also understanding what the world is made of and how it functions. People should know something about stars, matter and chemistry. People often say that they don't like chemistry but we deal with chemistry all the time. People don't know what heat is, they hardly know what water is. I'm always surprised how little people know about anything. I'm puzzled by it.”
Max F. Perutz

“The division of our culture is making us more obtuse than we need be: we can repair communications to some extent: but, as I have said before, we are not going to turn out men and women who understand as much of their world as Piero della Francesca did of his, or Pascal, or Goethe. With good fortune, however, we can educate a large proportion of our better minds so that they are not ignorant of the imaginative experience, both in the arts and in science, nor ignorant either of the endowments of applied science, of the remediable suffering of most of their fellow humans, and of the responsibilities which, once seen, cannot be denied.”
C.P. Snow

“At one time, the state of culture in Czechoslovakia was described, rather poignantly, as a 'Biafra of the spirit'. . . I simply do not believe that we have all lain down and died. I see far more than graves and tombstones around me. I see evidence of this in . . . expensive books on astronomy printed in a hundred thousand copies (they would hardly find that many readers in the USA) . . .”
Václav Havel

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