James Kaplan





James Kaplan



James Kaplan is a novelist and nonfiction writer whose essays, reviews, and profiles have appeared in The New Yorker, the New York Times Magazine, Vanity Fair, Esquire, and New York. He coauthored John McEnroes autobiography, You Cannot Be Serious, a number-one New York Times bestseller, and coauthored the bestselling Dean and Me with Jerry Lewis. He lives in Westchester, New York, with his wife and three sons.

Average rating: 3.92 · 6,298 ratings · 640 reviews · 21 distinct works · Similar authors
Frank: The Voice

4.02 avg rating — 1,372 ratings — published 2010 — 13 editions
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Sinatra: The Chairman

4.16 avg rating — 480 ratings — published 2015 — 9 editions
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Two Guys from Verona: A Nov...

3.05 avg rating — 77 ratings — published 1998 — 3 editions
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TIME Paul McCartney: The le...

4.03 avg rating — 32 ratings — published 2012 — 3 editions
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LIFE The Rat Pack: The Orig...

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4.12 avg rating — 25 ratings — published 2013
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The Airport

3.69 avg rating — 32 ratings — published 1994 — 2 editions
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Pearl's Progress

3.50 avg rating — 8 ratings — published 1989
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The Fielders: The Games's G...

really liked it 4.00 avg rating — 6 ratings — published 1995
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Frank: The Making of a Legend

really liked it 4.00 avg rating — 1 rating
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Der Feuerteufel von Rom

liked it 3.00 avg rating — 1 rating — published 2005
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“One cool morning—a rainstorm had swept through the night before; now the City of Angels sparkled like Eden itself—he was walking between soundstages in Culver City, carrying a cardboard cup of coffee, nodding to this glorious creature (dressed as a harem girl), then that glorious creature (a cowgirl), then that glorious creature (a secretary?)—they all smiled at him—when he ran into, of all people, an old pal of his from the Major Bowes days, a red-haired pianist who’d bounced around the Midwest in the 1930s, Lyle Henderson (Crosby would soon nickname him Skitch). Henderson was strolling with a creature much more glorious, if possible, than the three Sinatra had just encountered. She was tall, dark haired, with sleepy green eyes, killer cheekbones, and absurdly lush lips, lips he couldn’t stop staring at. Frankie! Henderson said, as they shook hands. His old chum was doing all right these days. Sinatra smiled, not at Henderson. The glorious creature smiled back bashfully, but with a teasing hint of directness in her dark eyes. The pianist—he was doing rehearsal duty at the studio—then got to say the six words that someone had to say, sometime, but that he and he alone got to say for the first time in history on this sparkling morning: Frank Sinatra, this is Ava Gardner.”
James Kaplan, Frank: The Voice

“I’m a Fool” may not be a great song, but Sinatra’s shattering performance of it transcends the material. His emotion is so naked that we’re at once embarrassed and compelled: we literally feel for him.”
James Kaplan, Frank: The Voice

“By all accounts, John Frankenheimer was singularly obsessed with The Manchurian Candidate, a film that, according to Daniel O’Brien, the director regarded “as his first truly personal project, feeling that the story made an all too valid point regarding the political manipulation and conditioning of American society.”
James Kaplan, Sinatra: The Chairman

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