Sheila Heti





Sheila Heti

Author profile


born
in Toronto, Canada
December 25, 1976

website

genre


About this author

Sheila Heti is the author of five books; three books of fiction, a children's book, and a work of non-fiction with Misha Glouberman. She is Interviews Editor at The Believer and is known for her long interviews. She lives in Toronto.


Sheila Heti isn't a Goodreads Author (yet), but they do have a blog, so here are some recent posts imported from their feed.

Sheila Heti hasn't written any blog posts yet.

Average rating: 3.32 · 8,852 ratings · 1,398 reviews · 27 distinct works · Similar authors
How Should a Person Be?
3.17 of 5 stars 3.17 avg rating — 5,929 ratings — published 2010 — 26 editions
Rate this book
Clear rating
Women in Clothes
by
3.88 of 5 stars 3.88 avg rating — 874 ratings — published 2014 — 5 editions
Rate this book
Clear rating
The Middle Stories
3.43 of 5 stars 3.43 avg rating — 414 ratings — published 2001 — 9 editions
Rate this book
Clear rating
Ticknor
3.24 of 5 stars 3.24 avg rating — 182 ratings — published 2005 — 9 editions
Rate this book
Clear rating
We Need a Horse
by
3.91 of 5 stars 3.91 avg rating — 56 ratings — published 2011
Rate this book
Clear rating
My Life Is a Joke
by
2.67 of 5 stars 2.67 avg rating — 33 ratings — published 2015
Rate this book
Clear rating
All Our Happy Days Are Stupid
3.19 of 5 stars 3.19 avg rating — 16 ratings — published 2015 — 2 editions
Rate this book
Clear rating
The Humble Simple Thing
by
2.0 of 5 stars 2.00 avg rating — 1 rating
Rate this book
Clear rating
The Chairs Are Where the Pe...
by
3.42 of 5 stars 3.42 avg rating — 567 ratings — published 2011 — 4 editions
Rate this book
Clear rating
xo Orpheus: Fifty New Myths
by
3.54 of 5 stars 3.54 avg rating — 269 ratings — published 2013 — 2 editions
Rate this book
Clear rating
More books by Sheila Heti…

Upcoming Events

No scheduled events. Add an event.

“It has long been known to me that certain objects want you as much as you want them. These are the ones that become important, the objects that you hold dear. The others fade from your life entirely. You wanted them, but they did not want you in return.”
Sheila Heti, How Should a Person Be?

“We tried not to smile, for smiling only encourages men to bore you and waste your time.”
Sheila Heti, How Should a Person Be?
tags: men, smile

“Because people who live their lives this way can look forward to a single destiny, shared with others of this type - though such people do not believe they represent a type, but feel themselves distinguished from the common run of man, who they see as held down by the banal anchors of the world. But while others actually build a life in which things gain meaning and significance, this is not true of the puer. Such a person inevitably looks back on life as it nears its end with a feeling of emptiness and sadness, aware of what they have built: nothing. In their quest for a life without failure, suffer, or doubt, that is what they achieve: a life empty of all those things that make a human life meaningful. And yet they started off believing themselves too special for this world!

But - and here is the hope - there is a solution for people of this type, and it's perhaps not the solution that could have been predicted. The answer for them is to build on what they have begun and not abandon their plans as soon as things start getting difficult. They must work - without escaping into fantasies about being the person who worked. And I don't mean work for its own sake, but they must choose work that begins and ends in a passion, a question that is gnawing at their guts, which is not to be avoided but must be realized and live through the hard work and suffering that inevitably comes with the process.

They must reinforce and build on what is in their life already rather than always starting anew, hoping to find a situation without danger. Puers don't need to check themselves into analysis. If they can just remember this - It is their everlasting switching that is the dangerous thing, and not what they choose - they might discover themselves saved. The problem is the puer ever anticipates loss, disappointment, and suffering - which they foresee at the very beginning of every experience, so they cut themselves off at the beginning, retreating almost at once in order to protect themselves. In this way, they never give themselves to life - living in constant dread of the end. Reason, in this case, has taken too much from life.

They must give themselves completely to the experience! One things sometimes how much more alive such people would be if they suffered! If they can't be happy, let them at least be unhappy - really, really unhappy for once, and then the might become truly human!”
Sheila Heti, How Should a Person Be?

Topics Mentioning This Author



Is this you? Let us know. If not, help out and invite Sheila to Goodreads.