Stephen Law





Stephen Law

Author profile


gender
male

website

genre


About this author

Stephen Law is a philosopher who teaches at Heythrop College in the University of London. He also edits the journal THINK, a source of philosophy aimed at the general public, affiliated with The Royal Institute of Philosophy.


Stephen Law isn't a Goodreads Author (yet), but he does have a blog, so here are some recent posts imported from his feed.
Just posted my first blog post for CFI here as part of their Free Thinking site. I will be posting exclusive Humanist/Skepticism related article there regularly - at least once a month. Do please follow!

My CFI blog is called The Outer Limits. They made me a nice banner - have a look.


This blog will of course continue. In particular I'll put more academic posts here (e.g. drafts of papers for di... Read more of this blog post »
 •  flag
0 comments
like  • 
Published on September 10, 2014 01:01 • 1 view
Average rating: 3.80 · 1,278 ratings · 170 reviews · 31 distinct works · Similar authors
Believing Bullshit: How Not...
3.7 of 5 stars 3.70 avg rating — 251 ratings — published 2011 — 4 editions
Rate this book
Clear rating
The Philosophy Gym: 25 Shor...
3.91 of 5 stars 3.91 avg rating — 270 ratings — published 2003 — 8 editions
Rate this book
Clear rating
The Philosophy Files
3.79 of 5 stars 3.79 avg rating — 139 ratings — published 2000 — 6 editions
Rate this book
Clear rating
Philosophy
4.1 of 5 stars 4.10 avg rating — 97 ratings — published 2007 — 5 editions
Rate this book
Clear rating
The Great Philosophers
3.72 of 5 stars 3.72 avg rating — 75 ratings — published 2007 — 4 editions
Rate this book
Clear rating
Humanism: A Very Short Intr...
3.66 of 5 stars 3.66 avg rating — 58 ratings — published 2010 — 3 editions
Rate this book
Clear rating
The War for Children's Mind...
3.98 of 5 stars 3.98 avg rating — 41 ratings — published 2006 — 9 editions
Rate this book
Clear rating
Really, Really Big Questions
4.22 of 5 stars 4.22 avg rating — 32 ratings — published 2009 — 4 editions
Rate this book
Clear rating
Philosophy Rocks!
3.78 of 5 stars 3.78 avg rating — 32 ratings — published 2002 — 3 editions
Rate this book
Clear rating
The Outer Limits
3.7 of 5 stars 3.70 avg rating — 23 ratings — published 2003 — 2 editions
Rate this book
Clear rating
More books by Stephen Law…

Upcoming Events

No scheduled events. Add an event.

“Reasonableness is a matter of degree. Beliefs can be very reasonable (Japan exists), fairly reasonable (quarks exist), not unreasonable (there's intelligent life on other planets) or downright unreasonable (fairies exist).

There's a scale of reasonableness, if you like, with very reasonable beliefs near the top and deeply unreasonable ones towards the bottom. Notice a belief can be very high up the scale, yet still be open to some doubt. And even when a belief is low down, we can still acknowledge the remote possibility it might be true.

How reasonable is the belief that God exists? Atheists typically think it very unreasonable. Very low on the scale. But most religious people say it is at least not unreasonable (have you ever met a Christian who said 'Hey, belief in God is no more reasonable than belief in fairies, but I believe it anyway!'?) They think their belief is at least halfway up the scale of reasonableness.

Now, that their belief is downright unreasonable might, in fact, be established empirically. If it turned out that not only is there no good evidence of an all-powerful, all-good God, there's also overwhelming evidence against (from millions of years of unimaginable and pointless animal suffering, including several mass extinctions - to thousands of children being crushed to death or buried alive in Pakistan earthquake, etc. etc. etc.) then it could be empirically confirmed that there's no God.

Would this constitute a 'proof' that there's no God? Depends what you mean by 'proof'. Personally I think these sorts of consideration do establish beyond any reasonable doubt that there is no all-powerful all-good God. So we can, in this sense, prove there's no God.

Yet all the people quoted in my last blog say you cannot 'scientifically' prove or disprove God's existence. If they mean prove beyond any doubt they are right. But then hardly anything is provable in that sense, not even the non-existence of fairies.”
Stephen Law

Topics Mentioning This Author

topics posts views last activity  
The Book Challenge: Stephanie's 2009 Book Challenge - Finished (almost) 7 208 Dec 31, 2009 10:13AM  


Is this you? Let us know. If not, help out and invite Stephen to Goodreads.