Nanette Rayman-Rivera's Blog: I am happy to announce that Scattered Light Publications has published my book, shana linda - pretty pretty

December 1, 2013

Harley Davidson had originally followed Indian when the latter had produced its first 45 cu. in. side-valve machine in 1927. Initially, the Indian 45s were the most highly regarded, but by the time Harley introduced its W-series in 1937, it was the Milwaukee-built bikes that enjoyed the better specification and reputation. Replacing the R-series—with which they had much in common—the three
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Published on December 01, 2013 22:34 • 7 views

November 12, 2013

When the original D-series Harley 45s were introduced in 1929, they were nicknamed the “three-cylinder Harleys” because their vertically mounted generators resembled an extra cylinder. Harley-Davidson produced these bikes in response to the success of the popular Indian Scout, but the D-series was not considered a success and it was replaced, in 1932, by the R-series. One of the benefits of the
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Published on November 12, 2013 22:17 • 9 views

October 10, 2013

The V-series were reliable side-valve V-twins that consistently out-sold every other range of Harley-Davidson during the early 1930s. Introduced in August 1929 for the 1930 model year, 1930 VL is an example of one of the all-new bikes brought in to replace the F-head V-twins. New features included the duplex primary chain, the steering head lock, and the I-beam forged fork legs. Twin headlights
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Published on October 10, 2013 00:31 • 6 views

September 11, 2013

Harley Davidson supplied thousands of traditional 45° V-twin WLA and WLC models to the Allied military during World War II, but the company also produced a small number of BMW-style machines for the war effort. Although the WLA was a good all-around military bike, the US army asked Harley-Davidson to produce a shaft-drive machine and Harley turned to the enemy for inspiration. BMW’s R75 was
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Published on September 11, 2013 00:22 • 1 view

August 8, 2013

In hill-climbing, riders launch their machines at impossibly steep hills. If riders make the summit then time decides the winner, but if no rider reaches the peak, then the one who has reached the highest point wins. A hill-climb bike appears simple, even if the reality is rather more complicated. The essential element is power, and in the case of this machine a methanol-burning eight-valve
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Published on August 08, 2013 14:55 • 1 view

July 4, 2013

Harley-Davidson 350CC Racing class was created soon after Harley unveiled its “Peashooter” racer in the summer of 1925. The bike was based on its new 21cu. in. ohv single-cylinder economy road bike. To make it competitive for dirt-track racing the bike had a shortened frame and simple telescopic forks that were triangulated for greater strength. All nonessential components were ditched from the
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Published on July 04, 2013 21:48 • 2 views

June 10, 2013

After the failure (comparatively) of the Sport Twin of 1919–23, Harley had another crack at the lightweight market by releasing a range of single-cylinder bikes for the 1926 model year: the A, B, AA, and BA. The design was entirely conventional, and inspired by Indian’s contemporary Prince as well as typical British machines of the period. The bikes were available with side-valve or
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Published on June 10, 2013 21:24 • 5 views

May 12, 2013

Committed to bike racing in 1914, Harley Davidson soon began to take the sport seriously. Special eight-valve racing twins were introduced in 1916. The cylinders and heads on the eight-valve racers were the work of British engineer Harry Ricardo and featured a hemispherical combustion chamber that had been developed on airplane engines during WW1. The bike shown here is a 1920 version with
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Published on May 12, 2013 21:11 • 1 view

April 5, 2013

Harley-Davidson first added sidecars to its model line in 1914, and later offered specially tuned engines for sidecar use. Before then, standard bikes such as this Model J just had a sidecar bolted onto them. Harley’s big F-head V-twin was ideal for pulling a sidecar and the company began offering sidecars as an option in 1914. From then until 1925 Harley’s sidecars were built by the Rogers
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Published on April 05, 2013 00:49 • 1 view

March 7, 2013

Harley-Davidson rarely rushed change, and it always knew the value of cubic inches. The history of the 45° F-head V-twin goes back to the original prototype twin of 1907, and by 1928 it was approaching its sell-by date. In 1922 Harley created the JD model by increasing capacity from 61 to 74 cubic inches. The result was a high-performance machine capable of outrunning almost any other vehicle on
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Published on March 07, 2013 00:27 • 4 views

I am happy to announce that Scattered Light Publications has published my book, shana linda - pretty pretty

Nanette Rayman-Rivera
poetry book with themes of homelessness, abuse, illness.

https://www.createspace.com/Customer/...

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