Hazel Rowley





Hazel Rowley

Author profile


born
in London, The United Kingdom
November 16, 1951

died
March 01, 2011

gender
female

website


About this author

Hazel Rowley was a British-born Australian author and biographer.

Born in London, Rowley emigrated with her parents to Adelaide at the age of eight. She studied at the University of Adelaide, graduating with Honours in French and German. Later she acquired a PhD in French. She taught literary studies at Deakin University in Melbourne, before moving to the United States.

Rowley's first published biography, of Australian novelist Christina Stead, was critically acclaimed and won the National Book Council's "Banjo" Award for non-fiction in 1994. Her next biographical work was about the African American writer Richard Wright. Her best-known book, Tête-à-tête (2005), covers the lives of Simone de Beauvoir and Jean-Paul Sartre (de Beauvoir had been...more


Average rating: 3.96 · 2,229 ratings · 420 reviews · 7 distinct works · Similar authors
Franklin and Eleanor: An Ex...
3.94 of 5 stars 3.94 avg rating — 1,263 ratings — published 2010 — 7 editions
Rate this book
Clear rating
Tête-à-Tête: The Tumultuous...
4.03 of 5 stars 4.03 avg rating — 761 ratings — published 2005 — 20 editions
Rate this book
Clear rating
Richard Wright: The Life an...
4.41 of 5 stars 4.41 avg rating — 22 ratings — published 2001 — 3 editions
Rate this book
Clear rating
Christina Stead
3.64 of 5 stars 3.64 avg rating — 22 ratings — published 1994 — 9 editions
Rate this book
Clear rating
Tete-A-Tete
4.0 of 5 stars 4.00 avg rating — 3 ratings — published 2007
Rate this book
Clear rating
Sartre e Beauvoir: A histór...
0.0 of 5 stars 0.00 avg rating — 0 ratings — published 2007
Rate this book
Clear rating
The Last Friend
by
3.71 of 5 stars 3.71 avg rating — 210 ratings — published 2004 — 11 editions
Rate this book
Clear rating
More books by Hazel Rowley…
“Beauvoir lent Maheu a recent English novel she had enjoyed, The Green Hat, by Michael Arlen. She admired its independent heroine, Iris Storm. Maheu did not. 'I have no liking for women of easy virtue,' he told her. 'Much as I like a woman to please me, I find it impossible to respect any woman I've had.' Beauvoir was indignant. 'One does not HAVE an Iris Storm!”
Hazel Rowley, Tête-à-Tête: Simone de Beauvoir and Jean-Paul Sartre

“I would have liked to have given a frank and balanced account of my own sexuality ... because it is not just a personal matter but a political one too." Beauvoir”
Hazel Rowley, Tête-à-Tête: The Tumultuous Lives and Loves of Simone de Beauvoir and Jean-Paul Sartre

“If a woman was not free, it could be for two reasons. Her lack of freedom could be inflicted, in which case it constituted oppression. Or it could be chosen, in which case it represented a moral fault. In both cases, it was absolute evil.”
Hazel Rowley, Tête-à-Tête: The Tumultuous Lives and Loves of Simone de Beauvoir and Jean-Paul Sartre