Ronald Gross





Ronald Gross



Average rating: 3.70 · 194 ratings · 28 reviews · 16 distinct works · Similar authors
Socrates' Way: Seven Keys t...

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3.83 avg rating — 66 ratings — published 2002 — 9 editions
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Peak Learning

3.35 avg rating — 69 ratings — published 1980 — 6 editions
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The Independent Scholar's H...

3.90 avg rating — 42 ratings — published 1982 — 3 editions
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The Lifelong Learner

really liked it 4.00 avg rating — 7 ratings — published 1977 — 2 editions
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Open Poetry: Four Anthologi...

it was amazing 5.00 avg rating — 2 ratings — published 1973
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Radical School Reform

liked it 3.00 avg rating — 3 ratings — published 1970 — 3 editions
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Independent Scholarship: Pr...

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liked it 3.00 avg rating — 1 rating — published 1983
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Invitation to Lifelong Lear...

0.00 avg rating — 0 ratings — published 1982
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High School

0.00 avg rating — 0 ratings — published 1971
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Diversity in higher educati...

0.00 avg rating — 0 ratings — published 1976
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“The secret of leading in a rapidly changing environment is to be committed to living the examined life oneself. Leaders must learn to be flexible and creative in tactics, and adaptable to shifts in culture and style, while holding to guiding principles of vision and ethics as though they were Platonic ideals.”
Ronald Gross, Socrates' Way: Seven Keys to Using Your Mind to the Utmost

“SOCRATES’ SCORN OF PEOPLE WHO REFUSE TO THINK Socrates had no patience for people who give up on stretching their minds because our reasoning so often falters and fails. He even coined a word for them: misologists—“haters of reasoning.” “It is a sad case,” he said, “when a man discovers that some of his cherished beliefs are false and therefore gives up on finding the truth. He should blame himself for failing to validate his belief, but instead he turns against thinking itself. So for the rest of his life he goes on hating reason and speaking ill of it.” Socrates would have recoiled from our common practice of dodging discussion of an important but controversial topic by saying, “You have your opinion, and I have mine. Let’s just agree to disagree.” To Socrates, this would have been an avoidance of the need to engage in dialogue, to be willing to test our convictions in the give-and-take of discussion. “Let us not let into our souls this idea that perhaps there is no soundness in reasoning,” he enjoined his friends. “Let us think instead that we ourselves are not yet sound, and struggle to become better thinkers.”
Ronald Gross, Socrates' Way: Seven Keys to Using Your Mind to the Utmost

“Socrates’ demonstration of the defect in the officers’ concept of courage has some important implications. A commander who believed that ordering a retreat was cowardly would be severely constrained in his options; one who had a broader definition would have more tactical choices.”
Ronald Gross, Socrates' Way: Seven Keys to Using Your Mind to the Utmost



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