Lorna Jowett





Lorna Jowett



Average rating: 4.08 · 451 ratings · 34 reviews · 7 distinct works · Similar authors
Sex and the Slayer: A Gende...

4.02 avg rating — 246 ratings — published 2005 — 3 editions
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TV Horror: Investigating th...

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really liked it 4.00 avg rating — 10 ratings — published 2013 — 4 editions
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Time on Television: Narrati...

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0.00 avg rating — 0 ratings — published 2015
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TV Goes to Hell: An Unoffic...

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4.24 avg rating — 137 ratings — published 2011 — 5 editions
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Cylons in America : Critica...

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3.95 avg rating — 44 ratings — published 2007 — 4 editions
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Feminism, Literature and Ra...

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4.14 avg rating — 14 ratings — published 2009 — 8 editions
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The Cult TV Book

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3.73 avg rating — 52 ratings — published 2010 — 6 editions
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“The show tries to offer its young female characters postfeminist identities that break down gender boundaries and hybridize gendered characteristics to produce new versions of power and heroism...being a woman involves work, work of constant self-(re)construction. Buffy's female characters are represented as always working in this way, whether to come to terms with power, or to maintain a "successful "good-girl" identity...”
Lorna Jowett, Sex and the Slayer: A Gender Studies Primer for the Buffy Fan

“That both Riley and Warren are attracted to independent young women is an interesting contradiction that serves to valorize the agency of the "girls" and to underline the static macho masculinity of those guys- they cannot or will not change, therefore they cannot keep the girl.”
Lorna Jowett, Sex and the Slayer: A Gender Studies Primer for the Buffy Fan

“The display of Angel's body and the sexual reaction it provokes lead to the revelation of his vampire nature: as he kisses Buffy, he shows his vamp face (a displaced manifestation of male desire?). The tension inherent in this display of the masculine body is that it actually has the effect of feminizing the character by positioning the male as sexual object to be looked at.”
Lorna Jowett, Sex and the Slayer: A Gender Studies Primer for the Buffy Fan



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