Christopher Moore's Blog

August 21, 2015

Do you want a signed first edtion of Secondhand Souls, but you can’t make it to an event, and you don’t want to wait for it to ship. Well Tuesday 8/25/15, you’ll be able to buy a copy in your own damn town. I wouldn’t wait around. Listed alphabetically by state…


Secondhand Souls – Confirmed Bookstores with Signed Copies


*Please note: while supplies last. You might want to call ahead to make sure the store still has signed copies available


 


ALASKA


 


FIRESIDE BOOKS


720 B S ALASKA ST


PALMER, AK 99645


907-745-2665


www.goodbooksbadcoffee.com


 


ALABAMA


ALABAMA BOOKSMITH


2626 19TH PL


HOMEWOOD, AL 35209


205-870-4242


www.alabamabooksmith.com


 


HUCK FINN & CO


2717 18TH ST SOUTH


HOMEWOOD, AL 35209


205-870-7463


 


PAGE & PALETTE


32 SOUTH SECTION ST


FAIRHOPE, AL 36532


251-928-5295


www.pageandpalette.com


 


ARIZONA


ANTIGONE BOOKS


411 NORTH 4TH AVE


TUCSON, AZ 85705


520-792-3715


www.antigonebooks.com


 


CHANGING HANDS BOOKSTORE


300 W CAMEL BACK RD


PHOENIX, AZ 85013


602-274-0067


www.changinghands.com


 


CHANGING HANDS BOOKSTORE


6428 S MCCLINTOCK DR C-101


TEMPE,  AZ 85283


480-730-0205


www.changinghands.com


 


MOSTLY BOOKS


6208 E SPEEDWAY


TUCSON, AZ 85712


520-571-0110


www.mostlybooksaz.com


 


PEREGRINE BOOK CO


219A N CORTEZ


PRESCOTT, AZ 86301


928-445-9000


www.peregrinebookcompany.com


 


POISONED PEN MYSTERY BOOKSTORE


4014 N GOLDWATER BLVD, STE 101


SCOTTSDALE, AZ 85251


480-947-2974


Poisonedpen.com


 


CALIFORNIA


A GREAT GOOD PLACE


6120 LA SALLE AVE


OAKLAND, CA 94611


510-339-8210


www.ggpbooks.com


 


ALEXANDER BOOK CO


50 SECOND STREET


SAN FRANCISCO, CA 94105


415-495-2992


www.alexanderbook.com


 


AVID READER


617 SECOND ST


DAVIS, CA 95616


530-758-4040


www.avidreaderbooks.com


 


BAY BOOKS


1029 ORANGE AVENUE


CORONADO, CA 92118


619-435-0070


www.baybookscoronado.com


 


BOOK PASSAGE


51 TAMAL VISTA BLVD STE B


CORTE MADERA, CA 94925


415-927-0690


www.bookpassage.com


 


BOOK SELLER


107 MILL ST


GRASS VALLEY, CA 95945


530-272-2131


www.thebookseller.biz


 


BOOKSHOP SANTA CRUZ


825 FRONT ST


SANTA CRUZ, CA 95060


831-423-0900


www.bookshopsantacruz.com


 


BOOKSHOP WEST PORTAL


80 W PORTAL AVE


SAN FRANCISCO, CA 94127


415-564-8080


www.bookshopwestportal.com


 


BORDERLAND BOOKS


866 VALENCIA ST


SAN FRANCISCO, CA 94110


415-824-8203


www.borderlands-books.com


 


CHAUCER & CO BOOK SHOP


3321 STATE ST


SANTA BARBARA, CA 93105


805-682-6787


www.chaucersbooks.com


 


COPPERFIELDS BOOKS


140 KENTUCKY


PETALUMA, CA   94952


707-762-0563


www.copperfieldsbooks.com


 


DARK CARNIVAL FANTASY & SCIENCE FICTION BOOKSTORE


3086 CLAREMONT AVE


BERKELEY, CA 94705


510-654-7323


www.darkcarnival.com


 


DIESEL A BOOKSTORE


5433 COLLEGE AVE


OAKLAND, CA 94618


510-653-9965


www.dieselbookstore.com/


 


DIESEL A BOOKSTORE BRENTWOOD


225 26TH ST STE 33


SANTA MONICA  , CA 90402


310-576-9960


www.dieselbookstore.com/


 


DIESEL A BOOKSTORE LARKSPUR


2419 LARKSPUR LANDING CIR STE A


LARKSPUR, CA 94939


415-785-8177


www.dieselbookstore.com/


 


GALLERY BOOKSHOP


319 KASTEN STREET


MENDOCINO, CA 95460


707-937-2665


www.gallerybookshop.com


 


GREEN APPLE


506 CLEMENT ST


SAN FRANCISCO, CA 94118


415-387-2272


www.greenapplebooks.com


 


KEPLERS


1010 EL CAMINO REAL


MENLO PARK, CA 94025


650-324-4321


www.keplers.com


 


MOES BOOKS


2476 TELEGRAPH AVE


BERKELEY, CA 94704


510-849-2087


www.moesbooks.com


 


MYSTERIOUS GALAXY


5943 BALBOA AVE STE 100


SAN DIEGO, CA 92111


858-268-4747


www.mystgalaxy.com


 


NORTHTOWN BOOKS


957 H ST


ARCATA, CA 95521


707-822-2834


www.northtownbooks.com


 


PEGASUS DOWNTOWN


2349 SHATTUCK AVE


BERKELEY, CA 94704


510-649-1320


www.pegasusbookstore.com


 


PEN DRAGON BOOKS


5560 COLLEGE AVE


OAKLAND, CA 94618


510-652-6259


www.pegasusbookstore.com


 


THE BOOKSMITH


1644 HAIGHT ST


SAN FRANCISCO, CA 94117


415-863-8688


www.booksmith.com


 


WARWICKS


7812 GIRARD AVE


LA JOLLA, CA 92037


858-454-0347


www.warwicks.com


 


COLORADO


BOOKWORM OF EDWARDS


295 MAIN ST, STE C101


EDWARDS, CO 81632


970-926-7323


www.bookwormofedwards.com


 


BOULDER BOOKSTORE


1107 PEARL ST


BOULDER, CO 80302


303-447-2074


www.boulderbookstore.com


 


EXPLORE BOOK SELLERS


221 E MAIN


ASPEN, CO 81611


970-925-5336


www.explorebooksellers.com


 


OFF THE BEATEN PATH


68 9TH ST


STEAMBOAT SPRINGS, CO 80487


970-879-6830


www.steamboatbooks.com


 


TATTERED COVER


2526 EAST COLFAX AVENUE


DENVER, CO 80206


303-322-7727


www.tatteredcover.com


 


WHO ELSE BOOKS


200 S BROADWAY


DENVER, CO 80209


303-744-2665


www.whoelsebooks.com


 


CONNECTICUT


BANK SQUARE BOOKS


53 W MAIN ST


MYSTIC, CT 06355


860-536-3795


www.banksquarebooks.com


 


RJ JULIA BOOKSELLERS


768 BOSTON POST RD


MADISON, CT 06443


203-245-3959


www.rjjulia.com


 


U CONN COOP


ONE ROYCE CIRCLE U101


STORRS, CT 06268


860-486-8523


www.bookstore.uconn.edu


 


WASHINGTON, DC.


BUSBOYS & POETS


235 CARROL ST NW


WASHINGTON, DC 20012


202-726-0856


www.busboysandpoets.com


 


KRAMER BOOKS & AFTERWORDS


1517 CONNECTICUT AVE NW


WASHINGTON, DC 20036


202-387-3825


www.kramers.com


 


POLITICS & PROSE BOOKSTORE


5015 CONNECTICUT AVE NW


WASHINGTON, DC 20008


202-364-1919


www.politics-prose.com


 


DELAWARE


BETHANY BEACH BOOKS


99 GARFIELD PKWY


BETHANY BEACH, DE 19930


302-539-2522


www.bethanybeachbooks.com


 


BROWSEABOUT SHOPS INC


133 REHOBOTH AVE


REHOBOTH BEACH, DE 19971


302-226-2665


www.browseaboutbooks.com


 


FLORIDA


CLASSIC BOOKSHOP


310 SOUTH COUNTY RD


PALM BEACH, FL 33480


561-655-2485


www.classicbookshop.com


 


THE BOOKMARK


220 FIRST ST


NEPTUNE BEACH, FL 32266


904-241-9026


www.bookmarkbeach.com


 


GEORGIA


A CAPPELLA BOOKS


208 HARALSON AVE


ATLANTA, GA 30307


404-681-5128


www.acappellabooks.com


 


HAWAII


BOOKENDS


600 KAILUA RD, STE 126


KAILUA, HI 96734


808-261-1996


 


IOWA


IOWA BOOK & SUPPLY CO


8 S CLINTON ST


IOWA CITY, IA 52240


319-337-4188


www.iowabook.com


 


ILLINOIS


ANDERSON BOOKSHOPS


123 W JEFFERSON AVE


NAPERVILLE, IL 60540


630-355-2665


www.andersonsbookshop.com


 


BOOK CELLAR


4736 38 N LINCOLN


CHICAGO, IL 60625


773-293-2665


www.bookcellarinc.com


 


BOOK TABLE INC


1045 LAKE ST


OAK PARK, IL 60301


708-386-9800


www.booktable.net


 


UNABRIDGED BOOKS INC


3251 N BROADWAY ST STE 1


CHICAGO, IL 60657


773-883-9119


www.unabridgedbookstore.com


 


KANSAS


WATERMARK BOOKS


4701 E DOUGLAS


WICHITA, KS 67218


316-682-1181


www.watermarkbooks.com


 


KENTUCKY


CARMICHAELS BOOKSTORE


2720 FRANKFORT AVE


LOUISVILLE, KY 40206


502-896-6950


www.carmichaelsbookstore.com


 


CARMICHAELS BOOKSTORE


1295 BARDSTOWN RD


LOUISVILLE, KY 40204


502-456-6950


www.carmichaelsbookstore.com


 


JOSEPH-BETH BOOKSELLERS


161 LEXINGTON GREEN CIR STE B1


LEXINGTON, KY 40503


859-273-2911


www.josephbeth.com


 


JOSEPH-BETH BOOKSELLERS


2785 DIXIE HIGHWAY


CRESTVIEW HILLS, KY 41017


859-912-7860


www.josephbeth.com


 


LOUISIANA


FAULKNER HOUSE OF BOOKS


624 PIRATES ALLEY


NEW ORLEANS, LA 70116


504-524-2940


www.faulknerhousebooks.com


 


GARDEN DISTRICT BOOKSHOP


2727 PRYTANIA STREET


NEW ORLEANS, LA 70130


504-895-2266


www.gardendistrictbookshop.com


 


MASSACHUSETTS


A B NORMAL BOOKS


321 CHICOPEE ROW


GROTON, MA 01450


www.abnormalbooks.com


 


BROOKLINE BOOKSMITH CORP


279 HARVARD ST


BROOKLINE, MA 02446


617-566-6660


www.brooklinebooksmith.com


 


HARVARD BOOKSTORES


1256 MASS AVE


CAMBRIDGE, MA 02138


617-661-1515


www.harvard.com


 


JABBERWOCKY BOOKSHOP & CAFE


50 WATER STREET


NEWBURYPORT, MA 01950


978-465-9359


www.jabberwockybookshop.com


 


ODYSSEY BOOKSTORE


9 COLLEGE STREET


SOUTH HADLEY, MA 01075


413-534-7307


www.odysseybks.com


 


PANDEMONIUM BOOKS & GAMES


4 PLEASANT ST


CAMBRIDGE, MA 02139


617-547-3721


www.pandemoniumbooks.com


 


PORTER SQUARE BKS INC


25 WHITE ST


CAMBRIDGE, MA 02140


617-491-2220


www.portersquarebooks.com


 


TRIDENT BOOKSELLERS & CAFE


338 NEWBURY ST


BOSTON, MA 02115


617-267-8688


www.tridentbookscafe.com


 


MAINE


SHERMANS OF PORTLAND


49 EXCHANGE ST


PORTLAND, ME 04101


207-773-4100


www.shermans.com


 


MICHIGAN


HORIZON BOOKS


243 E FRONT ST


TRAVERSE CITY, MI 49684


231-946-7290


www.horizonbooks.com


 


LITERATI BOOKSTORE


124 E WASHINGTON


ANN ARBOR, MI 48104


734-585-5567


www.literatibookstore.com


 


MCLEAN & EAKIN BOOKSELLERS


307 E LAKE ST


PETOSKEY, MI 49770


231-347-1180


www.mcleanandeakin.com


 


NICOLAS BOOKS


2513 JACKSON RD


ANN ARBOR, MI 48103


734-662-0600


www.nicolasbooks.com


 


SCHULER BOOKS INC


1982 W GRAND RIVER AVE


OKEMOS, MI 48864


517-349-8840


www.schulerbooks.com


 


SCHULER BOOKS INC


2660 28TH ST SE


GRAND RAPIDS, MI 49512


616-942-2561


www.schulerbooks.com


 


SCHULER BOOKS INC


2820 TOWNE CENTER BLVD


LANSING, MI 48912


517-316-7495


www.schulerbooks.com


 


SNOWBOUND BOOKS INC


118 N 3RD ST


MARQUETTE, MI 49855


906-228-4448


www.snowboundbooks.com


 


MINNESOTA


COMMON GOOD BOOKS


38 S SNELLING AVE


ST PAUL, MN 55105


651-225-8989


www.commongoodbooks.com


 


MAGERS & QUINN BOOKSELLERS


3038 HENNEPIN AVE SOUTH


MINNEAPOLIS, MN 55408


612-822-4611


www.magersandquinn.com


 


UNCLE HUGOS SCIENCE FICTION BOOKSTORE


2864 CHICAGO AVE SOUTH


MINNEAPOLIS, MN 55407


612-824-6347


www.unclehugo.com


 


MISSOURI


LEFT BANK BOOKS INC


399 NORTH EUCLID


ST LOUIS, MO 63108


314-367-6731


www.left-bank.com


 


SUBTERRANEAN BOOKS


6275 DELMAR BLVD


ST LOUIS, MO 63130


314-862-6100


Store.subbooks.com


 


MISSISSIPPI


LEMURIA BOOKSTORE


4465 I 55 N STE 204


JACKSON, MS 39206


601-366-7619


www.lemuriabooks.com


 


SQUARE BOOKS


160 COURTHOUSE SQUARE


OXFORD, MS 38655


662-236-2262


www.squarebooks.com


 


TURNROW BOOK CO


304 HOWARD ST


GREENWOOD, MS 38930


662-453-5995


www.turnrowbooks.com


 


MONTANA


COUNTRY BOOKSHELF


28 W MAIN ST


BOZEMAN, MT 59715


406-587-0166


www.countrybookshelf.com


 


NORTH CAROLINA


MALAPROPS BOOKSTORE/CAFE


55 HAYWOOD STREET


ASHEVILLE, NC 28801


800-441-9829


www.malaprops.com


 


PARK ROAD BOOKS


4139 PARK ROAD


CHARLOTTE, NC 28209


704-525-9239


www.parkroadbooks.com


 


QUAIL RIDGE BOOKS


3522 WADE AVE


RALEIGH, NC 27607


919-828-1588


www.quailridgebooks.com


 


REGULATOR BOOKSHOP


720 9TH ST


DURHAM, NC 27705


919-286-2700


www.regulatorbookshop.com


 


NEBRASKA


BOOKWORM INC


2501 S 90TH ST, STE 111


OMAHA, NE 68124


402-392-2877


www.bookwormomaha.com


 


NEW HAMPSHIRE


GIBSONS BOOKSTORE


45 S MAIN ST


CONCORD, NH 03301


603-224-0562


www.gibsonsbookstore.com


 


INNISFREE BOOKSHOP


312 DANIEL WEBSTER HIGHWAY, STE 116


MEREDITH, NH 03253


603-279-3905


Millsfallmarketplace.com


 


NEW YORK


BOOK HOUSE OF STUYVESANT PLAZA


1475 WESTERN AVE


ALBANY, NY 12203


518-489-4761


www.bhny.com


 


BOOK REVUE


313 NEW YORK AVENUE


HUNTINGTON, NY 11743


631-271-1442


Bookrevue.com


 


BOOKSTORE PLUS MUSIC


2491 MAIN ST


LAKE PLACID, NY 12946


518-523-2950


www.thebookstoreplus.com


 


HOBART + WM SMITH COLLEGE, THE COLLEGE STORE


51 ST CLAIR ST


GENEVA, NY 14456


315-781-3449


www.collegestore.hws.edu


 


MYSTERIES ON MAIN STREET


144 W MAIN ST


JOHNSTOWN, NY 12095


518-736-2665


www.mysteriesonmainstreet.com


 


NORTHSHIRE SARATOGA


424 BROADWAY


SARATOGA SPRINGS, NY 12866


518-682-4200


www.northshire.com


 


OBLONG BOOKS & MUSIC


6420 MONTGOMERY ST STE 6


RHINEBECK, NY  12572


845-876-0500


www.oblongbooks.com


 


TALKING LEAVES INC


3158 MAIN ST


BUFFALO, NY 14214


716-837-8554


www.tleavesbooks.com

OHIO

BOOK LOFT


631 S THIRD ST.


COLUMBUS, OH 43206


614-464-1774


www.bookloft.com


 


BOOKSHELF


7754 CAMARGO RD


CINCINNATI, OH 45243


513-271-9140


www.cincybookshelf.com


 


JOSEPH-BETH BOOKSELLERS


2692 MADISON RD


CINCINNATI, OH 45208


513-396-8960


www.josephbeth.com


 


LARRY SMITH BOOKSELLER


3824 PATRICIA DR


UPPER ARLINGTON, OH 43220


614-442-1010


 


OREGON


ANNIE BLOOMS BOOKS


7834 SW CAPITAL HWY


PORTLAND, OR 97219


503-246-0053


www.annieblooms.com


 


POWELLS BOOKS INC


PORTLAND, OR

http://www.powells.com/biblio/2-9780061779787-42


 


VJ BOOKS


12250 SW MYSLONY ST


TUALATIN, OR 97062


503-750-5310


www.vjbooks.com


 


PENNSYLVANIA


CHESTER COUNTY BOOK CO


967 PAOLI PIKE


WEST CHESTER, PA 19380


610-696-1661


www.chestercountybooks.com


 


DOYLESTOWN BOOKSHOP


16 S MAIN ST


DOYLESTOWN, PA 18901


215-230-7610


www.doylestownbookshop.com


 


TOWNE BOOK CENTER


220 PLAZA DR STE 3


COLLEGEVILLE, PA 19426


610-454-0640


www.townebc.com


 


RHODE ISLAND


BOOKS ON THE SQUARE


471 ANGELL ST


PROVIDENCE, RI 02906


401-331-9097


www.booksq.com


 


BROWN UNIV BOOKSTORE


244 THAYER ST.


PROVIDENCE, RI 02912


401-863-3168


www.brown.edu


 


SOUTH CAROLINA


BOOKSMITH


283 MARKET ST


SENECA, SC 29678


http://thebooksmith.com


 


TENNESSEE


BOOKSELLERS AT LAURELWOOD


387 PERKINS RD EXTD


MEMPHIS, TN 38117


901-683-9801


www.thebooksellersatlaurelwood.com


 


PARNASSUS BOOK


3900 HILLSBORO PIKE


NASHVILLE, TN 37215


615-953-2243


www.parnassusbooks.net


 


TEXAS


BOOKPEOPLE


603 N LAMAR


AUSTIN, TX 78703


512-472-5050


www.bookpeople.com


 


BRAZOS BOOKSTORE


2421 BISSONNET ST


HOUSTON, TX 77005


713-523-0701


www.brazosbookstore.com


 


MURDER BY THE BOOK


2342 BISSONNET ST


HOUSTON, TX 77005


713-524-8597


www.murderbooks.com


 


UTAH


KINGS ENGLISH


1511 SOUTH 15TH EAST


SALT LAKE CITY, UT 84105


801-484-9100


www.kingsenglish.com


 


VERMONT


NORTHSHIRE BOOKSTORE


4869 MAIN ST


MANCHESTER CENTER, VT 05255


802-362-2200


www.northshire.com


 


PHOENIX BOOKS


21 ESSEX WAY STE 407


ESSEX JUNCTION, VT 05452


802-872-7111


www.phoenixbooks.biz


 


PHOENIX BOOKS BURLINGTON


191 BANK ST 1ST FL


BURLINGTON, VT 05401


802-448-3350


www.phoenixbooks.biz


 


YANKEE BOOKSHOP


12 CENTRAL ST


WOODSTOCK, VT 05091


802-457-2411


www.yankeebookshop.com


 


WASHINGTON


AUNTIES BOOKSTORE


402 WEST MAIN ST


SPOKANE, WA 99201


509-838-0206


www.auntiesbooks.com


 


EAGLE HARBOR BOOK CO


157 WINSLOW WAY EAST


BAINBRIDGE ISLAND, WA 98110


206-842-5332


www.eagleharborbooks.com


 


ELLIOTT BAY BOOK CO


1521 10TH AVE


SEATTLE, WA 98122


206-624-6600


www.elliottbaybook.com


 


THIRD PLACE CO


17171 BOTHELL WAY NE


LAKE FOREST PARK, WA 98155


206-366-3333


www.thirdplacebooks.com


 


VILLAGE BOOKS


1200 11TH ST


BELLINGHAM, WA 98225


360-671-2626


www.villagebooks.com


 


WISCONSIN


BOSWELL BOOK CO


2559 N DOWNER AVE


MILWAUKEE, WI 53211


414-332-1181


www.boswellbooks.com


 


CANADA


 


MCNALLY ROBINSON BOOKSELLERS


3130 -8TH STREET EAST


SASKATOON, SK S7H0W2


1-306-955-3599


www.mcnallyrobinson.com


 


PERFECT BOOKS


258A ELGIN STREET


OTTAWA, ON K2P1L9


1-613-231-6468


www.perfectbooks.ca


 


BAKKA PHOENIX BOOKS


84 HARBORD ST


TORONTO, ON M5S1G5


1-416-963-9993


www.bakkaphoenixbooks.com


 


FANFARE BOOKS


92 ONTARIO STREET


STRATFORD, ON N5A3H2


1-519-273-1010


Fanfarebooks.ca


 


NOVEL IDEA


156 PRINCESS STREET


KINGSTON, ON K7L1B1


1-613-546-9799


Novelideabooks.ca


 


BOOKMARK HALIFAX


5686 SPRING GARDEN RD


HALIFAX, NS B3J1H5


1-902-423-0419


Bookmarkinc.ca


 


MCNALLY ROBINSON BOOKSELLERS


GRANT PARK SHOPPING CENTRE


1120 GRANT AVE. UNIT 4000


WINNIPEG, MB R3M2A6


1-204-475-0483


www.mcnallyrobinson.com


 


BOLEN BOOKS LTD


111-1644 HILLSIDE AVENUE


VICTORIA, BC V8T2C5


1-250-595-4232


www.bolen.bc.ca


 


MOSAIC BOOKS


411 BERNARD AVENUE


KELOWNA, BC V1Y6N8


1-250-763-4418


Mosaicbooks.ca


 


MUNROS BOOKSTORE


1108 GOVERNMENT STREET


VICTORIA, BC V8W1Y2


1-250-382-2464


www.munrobooks.com


 


TANNERS – A BOOKSTORE & MORE


2436 BEACON AVENUE


SIDNEY, BC V8L1X8


1-250-656-2345


www.tannersbooks.com


 


CAFE BOOKS


100 – 826 MAIN STREET


CANMORE, AB T1W2B7


1-403-678-0809


www.cafebooks.ca


 


 

6 likes · Like  •  1 comment  •  flag
Published on August 21, 2015 10:19 • 506 views

July 21, 2015

Chris will be touring for his new novel Secondhand Souls from August to October. Check the dates below to find out where you can catch the man himself.



Monday, August 24 @ 7PM

BOOKS INC.

601 Van Ness

San Francisco, CA 94102

(415) 776-1111
Tuesday, August 25 @ 7PM

UNIVERSITY BOOK STORE

4326 University Way NE

Seattle, WA 98105

(800) 335-7323
Wednesday, August 26 @ 7PM

THIRD PLACE BOOKS

17171 Bothell Way NE

Lake Forest Park, WA 98155

(206) 366-3333
Thursday, August 27 @ 7PM

POWELLS

3415 SW Cedar Hills Blvd

Beaverton, OR 97005

(503) 228-4651
Friday, August 28 @ 7PM

TATTERED COVER

2526 E Colfax Ave

Denver, CO 80206

(303) 322-7727
Sunday, August 30 @ 3PM

MYSTERIOUS GALAXY BOOKS

5943 Balboa Ave, #100

San Diego, CA 92111

(858) 268-4747
Monday, August 31 @ 7PM

CHANGING HANDS BOOKSTORE @ THE CRESCENT BALLROOM

308 North 2nd Ave

Phoenix, AZ 85003

(602) 274-0067

Book online
Wednesday, September 2 @ 6PM

BROOKLINE BOOKSMITH @ COOLIDGE CORNER THEATER

290 Harvard St

Brookline, MA 02446

(617) 566-6660

Book online
Thursday, September 3 @ 7PM

CHESTER COUNTY BOOK COMPANY @ STETSON MIDDLE SCHOOL

1060 Wilmington Pike

West Chester, PA 19382

Book online at Chester County Book Company or call (610) 696-1661.
Sunday, September 5 @ 7PM

QUAIL RIDGE BOOKS

Ridgewood Shopping Center

3522 Wade Ave

Raleigh, NC 27607

(919) 828-1588
Sunday, September 6 @ 5PM

AJC DECATUR BOOK FESTIVAL

101 E Court Square

Decatur, GA 30030
Tuesday, September 8 @ 7PM

ANDERSON’S BOOKSHOP

123 W Jefferson Ave

Naperville, IL 60540

(630) 355-2665
Wednesday, September 9 @ 7PM

BOSWELL BOOK COMPANY

2559 N Downer Ave

Milwaukee, WI 53211

(414) 332-1181
Thursday, September 10 @ 5:30PM

LITERARY LIBATIONS @ FREDERIK MEIJER GARDENS

1000 E Beltline Ave NE

Grand Rapids, MI 49525
Saturday, September 12 @ 2PM

BARNES & NOBLE #2089

189 The Grove Drive

Los Angeles, CA 90036

(323) 525-0270
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VROMANS BOOKSTORE

695 E Colorado Blvd

Pasadena, CA 91101

(626) 449-5320
Friday, September 18 @ 7PM

BOOK PASSAGE

51 Tamal Vista Blvd

Corte Madera, CA 94925

(415) 927-0960
Friday, September 25 @ 7:30PM

BOOKSHOP SANTA CRUZ

1520 Pacific Ave

Santa Cruz, CA 95060

(831) 423-0900
Saturday, September 26 @ 7:30PM

KEPLER’S

1010 El Camino Real

Menlo Park, CA 94025

(650) 324-4321
Saturday, October 3 @ 2PM

COPPERFIELD’S BOOKS

140 Kentucky St

Petaluma, CA 94952

(707) 762-0563
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Published on July 21, 2015 07:27 • 823 views

June 18, 2015

Prologue

(Selected from the Great Big Book of Death: First Edition)


1. Congratulations, you have been chosen to act as Death, it’s a dirty job, but someone has to do it. It is your duty to retrieve soul vessels from the dead and dying and see them on to their next body. If you fail, Darkness will cover the world and Chaos will reign.


2. Some time ago, the Luminatus, or the Great Death, who kept balance between light and darkness, ceased to be. Since then, Forces of Darkness have been trying to rise from below. You are all that stands between them and destruction of the collective soul of humanity. Try not to screw up.


3. In order to hold off the Forces of Darkness, you will need a number two pencil and a calendar, preferably one without pictures of kitties on it. Keep it near you when you sleep.


4. Names and numbers will come to you. The number is how many days you have to retrieve the soul vessel. Do not be late. You will know the vessels by their crimson glow.


5. Don’t tell anyone what you do, or the Forces of Darkness etc. etc. etc.


6. ­People may not see you when you are performing your Death duties, so be careful crossing the street. You are not immortal.


7. Do not seek others of your kind. Do not waver in your duties or the Forces of Darkness will destroy you and all that you care about.


8. You do not cause death, you do not prevent death, you are a servant of Destiny, not its agent. Get over yourself.


9. Do not, under any circumstances, let a soul vessel fall into the hands of those from below—­because that would be bad.


Part One

Do not be afraid

Everyone before you has died

You cannot stay

Any more than a baby can stay forever in the womb

Leave behind all you know

All you love

Leave behind pain and suffering

This is what Death is.


—­The Book of Living and Dying
(The Tibetan Book of the Dead)


1
Day of the Dead

It was a cool, quiet November day in San Francisco and Alphonse Rivera, a lean, dark man of fifty, sat behind the counter of his bookstore flipping through the Great Big Book of Death. The old-­fashioned bell over the door rang and Rivera looked up as the Emperor of San Francisco, a great woolly storm cloud of a fellow, tumbled into the store followed by his faithful dogs, Bummer and Lazarus, who ruffed and frisked with urgent intensity, then darted around the store like canine Secret Service agents, clearing the site in case a sly assassin or meaty pizza lurked among the stacks.


“The names must be recorded, Inspector,” the Emperor proclaimed, “lest they be forgotten!”


Rivera was not alarmed, but by habit his hand fell to his hip, where his gun used to ride. Twenty-­five years a cop, the habit was part of him, but now the gun was locked in a safe in the back room. He kept an electric stun gun under the counter that in the year since he opened the store had been moved only for dusting.


“Whose names?”


“Why the names of the dead, of course,” said the Emperor. “I need a ledger.”


Rivera stood up from his stool and set his reading glasses on the counter by his book. In an instant, Bummer, the Boston terrier, and Lazarus, the golden retriever, were behind the counter with him, the former standing up on his hind legs, hopeful bug eyes raised in tribute to the treat gods, a pantheon to which he was willing to promote Rivera, for a price.


“I don’t have anything for you,” said Rivera, feeling as if he should have somehow known to have treats handy. “You guys aren’t even sup- posed to be in here. No dogs allowed.” He pointed to the sign on the door, which not only was facing the street, but was in a language Bummer did not read, which was all of them.


Lazarus, who was seated behind his companion, panting peacefully, looked away so as not to compound Rivera’s embarrassment.


“Shut up,” Rivera said to the retriever. “I know he can’t read. He can take my word for it that’s what the sign says.”


“Inspector?” The Emperor smoothed his beard and shot the lapels of his dingy tweed overcoat, composing himself to offer assistance to a citizen in need. “You know, also, that Lazarus can’t talk.”


“So far,” said Rivera. “But he looks like he has something to say.” The ex-­cop sighed, reached down, and scratched Bummer between the ears.


Bummer allowed it, dropped to all fours, and chuffed. You could have been great, he thought, a hero, but now I will have to sniff a mile of heady poo to wash the scent of your failure out of my nose—­oh, that feels nice. Oh, very nice. You are my new best friend.


“Inspector?”


“I’m not an inspector anymore, Your Grace.”


“Yet ‘inspector’ is a title you’ve earned by good ser­vice, and it is yours forevermore.”


“Forevermore,” Rivera repeated with a smile. The Emperor’s grandiose manner of speaking had always amused him, reminded him of some more noble, genteel time which he’d never really experienced. “I don’t mind the title following me, so much, but I had hoped I’d be able to leave all the strange happenings behind with the job.”


“Strange happenings?”


“You know. You were there. The creatures under the streets, the Death Merchants, the hellhounds, Charlie Asher—­you don’t even know what day it is and you know—­”


“It’s Tuesday,” said the Emperor. “A good man, Charlie Asher—­a brave man. Gave his life for the ­people of our city. He will long be missed. But I am afraid the strange happenings continue.”


“No, they don’t,” said Rivera, with more authority than he felt. Move along. Moving along. That it was Día de los Muertos, the Day of the Dead, had put him on edge already, sent him to the drawer to retrieve the Great Big Book of Death, but he would not give weight to more reminders. Acknowledge a nightmare and you give it power, someone had told him. Maybe the spooky Goth girl who used to work for Charlie Asher. “You said you needed a ledger?”


“To record the names of the dead. They came to me last night, hundreds of them, telling me to write down their names so they are not forgotten.”


“In a dream?” Rivera did not want to hear this. Not at all. It had been a year since all that had happened, since the Big Book had arrived, calling him to action, and he’d walked away. So far, so good.


“We slumbered by the restrooms at the St. Francis Yacht Club last night,” said the Emperor. “The dead came across the water, floating, like the fog. They were quite insistent.”


“They can be that way, can’t they?” said Rivera. The Emperor was a crazy old man, a sweet, generous, and sincere lunatic. Unfortunately, in the past, many of the his insane ravings had turned out to be true, and therein lay the dread that Rivera felt rising in his chest.


“The dead speak to you as well, then, Inspector?”


“I worked homicide for fifteen years, you learn to listen.”


The Emperor nodded and gave Rivera’s shoulder a fatherly squeeze. “We protect the living, but evidently we are also called to serve the dead.”


“I don’t have any ledgers, but I carry some nice blank books.”


Rivera led the Emperor to a shelf where he stocked cloth and leather-bound journals of various sizes. “How many of the dead will we be recording?” Something about dealing with the Emperor put you in a position of saying things that sounded less than sane.


“All of them,” said the Emperor.


“Of course, then you’ll need a substantial volume.” Rivera handed him a sturdy leather journal with letter-­sized pages.


The Emperor took the book, flipped through it, ran his hand over the cover. He looked from the book to Rivera and tears welled in his eyes. “This will be perfect.”


“You’ll need a pen,” said Rivera.


“Pencil,” said the Emperor. “A number two pencil. They were quite specific.”


“The dead?” said Rivera.


Bummer ruffed, the subtext of which was: “Of course, the dead, you tree-­bound squirrel. Haven’t you been paying attention?” Rivera had still failed to produce any treats and had ceased scratching Bummer behind the ears, so fuck him.


Lazarus whined apologetically, the subtext of which was: “Sorry, he’s been an insufferable dickweed since he was given the powers of a hellhound, but the old man likes him, so what are you going to do? Still, it wouldn’t kill you to keep some treats behind the counter for your friends.”


“Yes, the dead,” said the Emperor.


Rivera nodded. “I don’t stock pencils in the store, but I think I can help you out.” He moved back behind the counter and opened a d ­ rawer. When the Great Big Book of Death had shown up in his mailbox, he’d bought the calendar and the pencils as it had instructed. He still had five of the pencils he’d purchased. He handed one to the Emperor, who took it, inspected the point, then dropped it into the inside pocket of his enormous overcoat, where Rivera was fairly sure he would never find it again.


“What do I owe you for the book?” asked the Emperor. He dug several crumpled bills from his coat pocket, but Rivera waved them off.


“It’s on me. In ser­vice of the city.”


“In ser­vice of the city,” repeated the Emperor, then to the troops, “Gentlemen, we are off to the library to begin our list.”


“How will you get the names?” asked Rivera.


“Well, obituaries, of course. And then perhaps a stop at the police station for a look at the missing persons reports. Someone there will help me, won’t they?”


“I’m sure they will. I’ll call ahead to the Central Station on Vallejo. But I can’t help but think you’ve got a big task ahead of you. You said you need to record all of the dead. The city has been here, what, a hundred and sixty years? That’s a lot of dead ­people.”


“I misspoke, Inspector. All of the dead, but with some urgency about those who passed in the last year.”


“The last year? Why?”


The Emperor shrugged. “Because they asked me to.”


“I mean why the emphasis on the last year?”


“So they won’t be forgotten.” The Emperor scratched his great, grizzly beard as he tried to remember. “Although they said lost, not forgotten. So they won’t be lost to the darkness.”


Rivera felt his mouth go dry and his face drain of blood. He opened the door for the Emperor, and the ringing bell jostled his power of speech. “Good luck, then, Your Majesty. I’ll call the desk at Central Station. They’ll expect you.”


“Many thanks.” The Emperor tucked the leather book under his arm and saluted. “Onward, men!” He led the dogs out of the shop, Bummer kicking up his back feet against the carpet as if to shed himself of the dirty business that was Alphonse Rivera.


Rivera returned to his spot behind the counter and stared at the cover of the Great Big Book of Death. A stylized skeleton grinned gleefully back at him, the bodies of five people impaled on his bony fingers and rendered in cheerful Day of the Dead colors.


Lost to the darkness? Only the last year?


Rivera had bought the pencils and the calendar as the Big Book had instructed, but then he’d done absolutely nothing else with them except put them in the drawer by the cash register. And nothing bad had happened. Nothing. He’d peacefully taken an early retirement from the force, opened the bookstore, and set about reading books, drinking coffee, and watching the Giants on the little television in the shop. Nothing bad had happened at all.


Then he noticed, just below the title on the Big Book were the words “revised edition.” Words that had not been there, he was sure, before the Emperor had come into the shop.


He pulled open the drawer, swept the pencils and office supply detritus aside, and pulled out the calendar he’d bought. Right there, in the first week of January, was a name and number, written in his handwriting. Then another, every few days to a week, until the end of the month, all in his handwriting, none of which he remembered writing.


He flipped through the pages. The entire calendar was filled. But nothing had happened. None of the ominous warnings in the Big Book had come to pass. He tossed the calendar back into the drawer and opened the Great Big Book of Death to the first page, a first page that had changed since he’d first read it.


It read: “So, you fucked up—­”


AHHHHHHHIEEEEEEEEEE!” A piercing shriek from right behind him. Rivera leapt two feet into the air and bounced off the cash register as he turned to face the source of the scream, landing with his hand on his hip, his eyes wide, and his breath short.


Santa Maria!


A woman, wraith thin, pale as blue milk, trailing black rags like tattered shrouds, stood there—­right there—­not six inches away from him. She smelled of moss, earth, and smoke.


“How did you get—­”


AHHHHHHHHIEEEEEEEEE!” Right in his face this time. He scrambled backward against the counter, leaning away from her in spine-­cracking dread.


“Stop that!”


The wraith took a step back and grinned, revealing blue-­black gums. “It’s what I do, love. Harbinger of doom, ain’t I?”


She took a deep breath as if to let loose with another scream and there was an electric sizzle as the stun gun’s electrodes found purchase through her tatters. She dropped to the floor like a pile of damp rags.



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Published on June 18, 2015 17:45 • 812 views

December 24, 2014

Friends of Dorothy – An excerpt from Secondhand Souls


A novel by Christopher Moore


©2014 Christopher Moore


Mike Sullivan is a painter on the Golden Gate Bridge. From time to time, the ghosts of the bridge visit him. Like this one:


#  #  #


            I was working in the Naval Investigations Service out of Chi-town when we first got word of a potential enemy propaganda operation called the “Friends of Dorothy” operating on the West Coast, probably originating in Frisco. I know, what’s Naval Investigations doing in Chicago, a thousand miles from the nearest ocean? That’s the slickness of our strategy, see: Who’s gonna suspect navy cops in the middle of  Cow Town on the Prairie, am I right? Of course I am.


Anyways, we get word that new troops shipping out to the Pacific of San Fran are being approached on the down low by this Friends of Dorothy bunch, who are playing up on their pre-battle jitters, trying to cause some desertions, maybe even recruit spies for Tojo.


So the colonel looks around the office, and as I am the most baby-faced of the bunch, he decides to send me out to Frisco under cover as a new recruit to see if I can get the skinny on this Dorothy and her friends, before we got another Axis Annie or Tokyo Rose on our hands, only worse, because this Dorothy isn’t just taking a shot at our morale on the radio, she’s likely running secret operations.


I tell the colonel that despite my youthful mug, I am an expert on the ways of devious dames and I will have this Dorothy in the brig before he can say Hirohito is a bum, maybe faster. So five days later I find myself on the dog-back streets of San Fran with about a million other sailors, soldiers, and marines waiting to ship out.


Well, San Fran is getting to be known as liberty city, as this is the spot where many guys are going to see the good old U S of A for the last time ever, so in spite of restrictions and whatnot all along the Barbary Coast, every night the town is full of military guys out for one last party, looking for a drink or a dame or the occasional crap game. It’s a tradition by this time that the night before you ship out, you go up to the Top of the Mark, the night club on the top floor of the Mark Hopkins Hotel on California Street, where a guy can have a snort whilst looking at the whole city from bridge to bridge, and if he’s lucky, a good-smelling broad will take him for twirl around the dance floor and tell him that everything is going to be okay, even though most guys are suspicious that it’s not. And these are such dames as are doing this out of patriotism and the kindness of their heart, like the USO, so there’s no hanky panky or grab-assing.


So word has it, that the Friends of Dorothy are recruiting at the Top of the Mark, so I don a set of Navy whites and pea coat like a normal swabby, and stake out a spot by the doorman outside the hotel, and as guys go by, I am whispering, “Friends of Dorothy,” under my breath, like a guy selling dirty post cards or tickets to a sold-out Cubs game (which could happen when they make their run for the pennant). And before long, the cable car stops and off steps this corn-fed jarhead who is looking around and grinning at the buildings and the bay at the end of the street like he’s never seen water before, and he’s sort of wandering around on the sidewalk like he’s afraid of the doorman or something, and I gives him my hush-hush Friends of Dorothy whisper.


So Private Hayseed sidles up to me and says back, “Friends of Dorothy?”


“You’re damn skippy, marine,” says I.


And just like that the kid lights up like Christmas morning and starts pumping my hand like he’s supplying water to douse the Chicago fire, or maybe the Frisco fire, as I hear that they also have a fire, but I cannot but think that it was not a real fire as Frisco is clearly a toy town. Kid introduces himself as Eddie Boedeker Jr. from Sheep Shit, Iowa or Nebraska or one of your more square-shaped, corn-oriented states, I don’t remember. And he goes on how he is nervous and he has never done anything like this before, but he’s about to go off to war and might never come home, so he has to see –  and it’s all I can do to calm the kid down and stand him up against the wall beside me like he’s just there to take in the night air and whatnot. You see, I am dressed like a sailor, and he is a marine, and although technically, swabbies and jarheads are in the same branch of the service, it’s a time-honored tradition that when they are in port they fight like rats in a barrel, which is something I should have perhaps thought of when I picked my spy duds.


So on the spot I compose a slogan of war unity so as to shore up my cover. “Fight together or lose alone, even with no-necked fucking jarheads.” I try it out on the doorman like I’m reading it off a poster and he nods, so I figure we’re good to go.


“C’mon, marine,” I says to the Private Hayseed, “I’ll buy you a drink.”


So we go up the elevator to the Top of the Mark, and I order an Old Fashioned because there’s an orange slice in it and I’m wary of scurvy, and I ask the kid what he’ll have, and he says, “Oh, I ain’t much for drinking.”


And I says, “Kid, you’re about to ship out to get your guts blown out on some God-forsaken coral turd in the Pacific and you’re not going to have a drink before you go, what are you, some kind of moron?”


And the kid provides that, no, he’s a Methodist, but his ma has a record of the Moron Tabernacle Choir singing Silent Night that she plays every Christmas and so I figure the answer is yes and I order the kid an Old Fashioned with an extra orange slice hoping it might help cure stupid as well as scurvy. But I also figure that old Eddie here is exactly the kind of dim bulb that Dorothy and her cohorts will try to go for, so I press on, pouring a couple more Old Fashioneds into him, until the kid is as pink-faced as a sunburned baby and gets a little weepy about God and country and going off to war, while I keep trying to slide in questions about Dorothy, but the kid keeps saying maybe later, and asks if maybe we can’t go hear some jazz, as he has never heard jazz except on the radio.


Well the bartender provides as there is an excellent horn player over in the Fillmore, which is only a hop on the cable car, so I flip him four bits for the tip and I drag Eddie down to the street and pour him onto the cable car, which takes us up the hill and over to the Fillmore, which is where all the blacks live now, as it used to be Jap neighborhood until they shipped them off to camps and the blacks moved in from the South to work in the ship yards bringing with them jazz and blues and no little bit of dancing.


And as we’re getting off the car, I spots some floozies standing outside the club right below a war department poster with a picture of a similar dame that says, “She’s a booby trap! They can cure VD, but not regret.”


And as we’re walking up, I says, “Hey toots, you pose for that poster?” And one of the rounder dames says, “I might have sailor, but I ain’t heard no regrets yet,” which gives me a laugh, but makes Private Eddie just look down and smile into his top button.  He whispers to me on the side, “I ain’t never done anything like this before.”


I figured as much, but I say to the kid, “That’s what the Friends of Dorothy are for, kid,” just taking a shot in the dark.


And he gets a goofy grin and says, “That’s what the guy said.”


And I say, “What guy?” but by that time we’re through the door and the band is playing, the horn player going to town on the old standard Chicago, to which I remove my sailor’s hat, because it is, indeed, my kind of town. So we drink and listen to jazz and laugh at nothing much, cause the kid doesn’t want to think about where he’s going, and he doesn’t want to think about where he came from, and I can’t figure out how to get behind this Dorothy thing with the band playing. After a few snorts, the kid even lets a dame take him out on the dance floor, and because he more resembles a club-footed blind man killing roaches than a dancer, I head for the can to avoid associating with him, and on my way back, I accidently bump into a dogface, spilling his drink. And before I can apologize, when I am still on the part that despite his being a piss-ant, lame-brained, clumsy, ham-handed Army son of a bitch, that it is a total accident that I bump into him and spill his drink, he takes a swing at me. And since he grazes my chin no little, I am obliged to return his ministrations with a left to the fucking bread-basket and a right cross which sails safely across his bow. At which point, the entire 7th Infantry comes out of the woodwork, and soon I am dodging a dozen green meanies, taking hits to the engine room, the galley, as well as the bridge, and my return fire is having little to no effect on the thirty-eleven or so guys what are wailing on me. I am sinking fast, about to go down for the count. Then two of the G.I.s go flying back like they are catching cannonballs, and then two more from the other side, and through what light I can see, Private Eddie Boedeker, Jr. wades into the G.I.s like the hammer of fucking God, taking out a G.I. with every punch, and those that are not punched are grabbed by the shirt and hurled with no little urgency over tables, chairs, and various downed citizens, and it occurs to me that I have perhaps judged the kid’s dancing chops too harshly, for while he cannot put two dance steps together if you paint them on the floor, he appears to have a right-left combination that will stop a Panzer.


Before long guys from all branches of service are exchanging opinions and broken furniture and I hear the sinister chorus of  M.P. whistles, as which point I grab the kid by the belt and drag him backwards through the tables and the curtain behind the stage and out into the alley, where I collapse for second to collect my thoughts and test a loose tooth and the kid bends over, hands on his knees, gasping for breath, laughing and spitting a little blood.


“So, kid,” I says. “You saved my bacon.” And I offer him a bloody-knuckled handshake.


Kid takes my hand and says, “Friends of Dorothy,” and pulls me into a big hug.


“Yeah, yeah, Friends of fucking Dorothy,” I say, slapping him on the back. “Speaking of which,” I say, pushing him off. “Let’s take a walk—“


“I gotta get back to Fort Mason,” the kid says. “It’s nearly midnight. The cable cars stop at midnight and I gotta ship out in the morning.”


“I know, kid, but Friends of Dorothy,” I says. I’m aware all of sudden that I have strayed somewhat from my mission, and that if the kid goes, I’m going to have to start all over again, although I suspect I have not exactly stumbled onto the mastermind of the diabolical Dorothy’s organization. But still.


“Look,” says the kid. “This has been swell. Really swell. I really appreciate you, you know, being a friend, but I gotta go. I aint never done nothing like this, never met anyone like you. It’s been swell.”


“Well, you know–” I says, not knowing how to bail this out. That one tooth was definitely loose.


Suddenly the kid grabs me again, gives me a big hug, then turns and runs off toward the cable car stop. He’s about a half a block away when he turns and says, “I’m going to go see the Golden Gate Bridge in the morning. Oh-six-hundred. Ain’t never seen a sunrise over the ocean. I’ll meet you there. Say good-bye.”


And I’m am tempted to point out several things, including that he will have to see the Golden Gate Bridge as he passes under it when he ships out, that we are on the West Coast and the sun doesn’t rise over the ocean, and that there is no need to run, as I can hear the bell of the cable car and it is still blocks away, but these being finer points than I want to yell up an alley when there are M.P.s still on the prowl, I say, “I’ll be there.”


“Friends of Dorothy,” the kid says with a wave.


“Friends of Dorothy,” I say back at him. Which goes to show you, right there, the difference between sailors and marines: marines are fucking stupid. Running when you don’t have to.


So next morning I’m  on the bridge, crack of dawn, so hung-over I feel like if I don’t close my eyes I might bleed to death, but not having to worry about it, since my eyes are too swollen up to bleed, and I see the kid, all by himself, about halfway down the bridge, out in the fog, waving like a goddamn loony when he sees me. So I limp out to him, and when I get close he starts running at me, so I says, “No running! No goddamn running!”


But he keeps running, and now he’s got his arms out like to give me a big hug, which I am in no mood for.


So I back away and say give him an, “At ease, marine.”


And he stops, bounces on his toes like a little goddamn girl.


“I couldn’t wait to see you. I thought about you all night. I couldn’t sleep,” he says.


“Yeah, yeah, that’s good,” I say. “But about the Friends of Dorothy—“


“I’m sorry about that,” the kid says. “Really sorry. I mean, I want to, but I never did anything like that before. I mean, in Kansas nobody’s like that. I thought – I mean, if my folks –I thought I was the only one. Then this guy in boot camp told me about the Friends of Dorothy.”


That’s right. It was Kansas. Anyway, I says, “That’s it, you got to tell me about Dorothy, everything you know, Eddie.”


“But I don’t know nothing. I just, I just have these feelings—“


Then the kid grabs me, right then, and gives me a great big wet one, right on the kisser. I was so surprised I just about shit myself. So I push him off of me, you know, big flat palm to the chin, and when I get done spitting, I’m say, “What the hell was that about?”


And the kid looks like I just shot his dog. “Friends of Dorothy,” he says.


“Yeah, the Friends of Fucking Dorothy, that’s why I’m here, but what the fuck was that? You queer or something?”


And he goes, “Friends of Dorothy. Like the scarecrow. Like the tin man. Like the cowardly lion. People ain’t got anyone else like them. But Dorothy don’t care. Like you. Like us.”


“I ain’t like you kid. I got people. I got a wife and kid back in Chicago. I’d be out shooting the ass off of Tojo myself if I hadn’t blown my knee out in football in high school. I’m not Dorothy’s friend, I’m not your friend, kid.”


“Friends of Dorothy,” the kid says. “We find each other,” he says.


“Queers? That’s what this about? A bunch of fairies? Marines? Sailors? Are you fucking kidding me?”


“Friends of Dorothy,” the kid wails.


“Not anymore. Naval Investigative Service. I’m taking you in, kid. You’re going in the brig, and if you ever wanna get out, you’re going to tell me everything you know about the Friends of Dorothy. Everyone you ever talked to about them. I need names, places, dates.”


“But I’m shipping out today. I ain’t never done nothing like this.”


“And you’re not going to again,” I says. “It’s time of war, kid, and being queer is a court martiable offense. You and your Friends of Dorothy are traitors. Hell, they might even shoot you. You might make it back to Kansas, but it’s going to be in chains, to Leavenworth.” Rough, I know, but I’m hung-over and annoyed that I’ve been made a sap, and I’m just trying to scare the kid so he’s easier to handle.


The kid starts shaking his head and backing away. “You can’t tell my folks. You can’t tell my Dad. It would kill him.”


“Everyone’s going to know, kid. It’s going to be in the papers, so you might as well come clean.”


Then he turns and really starts to run.


“Where you think you’re going, kid? I got the whole fleet I can send after you. A deserter. A queer traitor and deserter.”


“Friends of Dorothy,” he wails. His face is melting into a big glob of snot and tears.


“Yeah, Friends of fucking Dorothy, traitor. Let’s go, Boedeker.”


The he just starts wailing, crying it, “But Friends of Dorothy! Friends of Dorothy!” and then, again with the running, but this time for the rail, and before I can get close to him, he’s over, head first. Hit the water like a gunshot. I bet they could hear it all the way to Fort Mason.


I look down and he’s just all bent up, like a broken scarecrow, floating dead in the waves.


#  #  #


“That’s the saddest story I’ve ever heard,” said Mike Sullivan.


“Yeah, it was the war. Tough times.”


“So, you, did you, I mean, did you jump too?” asked Mike.


“Nah, I went back to Chicago. Heart attack in fifty-eight.”


“Then why are you here?”


“Smoked a lot, ate a lot of bratwurst, we didn’t know stuff in those days.”


“No, why are you on the bridge?”


“No idea. Guess that’s why the Spanish broad wanted me to tell you my story. You want I should fetch her?”


“Maybe that would be good,” Mike said. The ghost’s story had made him a little woozy, he couldn’t figure out if it was nausea or anxiety, but neither were to be taken lightly when you were up on the bridge.


“So long, bridge painter,” said the ghost. “And by the way, you can tell the dame that you have not been helpful in the least. I feel like I’m the only one did any talking here. No offense.”


“You’ll want to fuck off, now,” said Mike, who despite being a nice guy, had his limits, which he was very close to reaching with this particular spirit


_____________________________________________________________________________________


Secondhand Souls is the sequel to A Dirty Job, so yes, it will have characters from that first book, but Mike Sullivan and his group of ghosts is kind of a fun addition,  I thought.

Seconhand Souls will be released August 25, 2015.

Merry Christmas Everyone!


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Published on December 24, 2014 12:23 • 894 views

December 24, 2013

Well happy holidays and beyond, my fluffy puppets. My humble gift to you, a chapter and a page from the new book.


Be safe, be kind, have fun….


THE SERPENT OF VENICE


 


ACT I


Fortunato’s Fate


Hell and Night must bring this monstrous birth to light.


—Iago, Othello, Act I, Scene 3


 


 





INVOCATION


Rise, Muse!

Darkwater sprite,

Bring stirring play

To vision’s light.


Rise, Muse!

On fin and tail

With fang and claw

Rend invention’s veil.


Come, Muse!

’Neath harbored ship,

Under night fisher’s torch,

And sleeping sailors slip.


To Venice, Muse!

Radiant venom convey,

Charge scribe’s driven quill

To story assay.


Of betrayal, grief and war,

Provoke, Muse, your howl

Of love’s laughter lost

and Heinous Fuckery, most foul…


 


 


 


CHAPTER ONE


The Trap




They waited at the dock, the three Venetians, for the fool to arrive.

“An hour after sunset, I told him,” said the senator, a bent- backed graybeard in a rich brocade robe befitting his office. “I sent a gondola myself to fetch him.”


“Aye, he’ll be here,” said the soldier, a broad-shouldered, fit brute of forty, in leather and rough linen, full sword and fighting dagger at his belt, black bearded with a scar through his right brow that made him look ever questioning or suspicious. “He thinks himself a connoisseur, and can’t resist the temptation of your wine cellar. And when it is done, we shall have more than Carnival to celebrate.”


“And yet, I feel sad,” said the merchant. A soft-handed, fair- skinned gent who wore a fine, floppy velvet hat, and a gold signet ring the size of a small mouse, with which he sealed agreements. “I know not why.”


They could hear the distant sounds of pipes, drums, and horns from across the lagoon in Venice. Torches bounced on the shore- line near Piazza San Marco. Behind them, the senator’s estate, Villa Belmont, stood dark but for a storm lantern in an upper window,




a light by which a gondolier might steer to the private island. Out on the water, fishermen had lit torches, which bobbed like dim, drunken stars against the inky water. Even during Carnival, the city must eat.


The senator put his hand on the merchant’s shoulder. “We per- form service to God and state, a relief to conscience and heart, a cleansing that opens a pathway to our designs. Think of the boun- teous fortune that will find you, once the rat is removed from the granary.”


“But I quite like his monkey,” said the merchant.


The soldier grinned and scratched his beard to conceal his amusement. “You’ve seen to it that he comes alone?”


“It was a condition of his invitation,” said the senator. “I told him out of good Christian charity all his servants were to be dismissed to attend Carnival, as I assured him I had done with my own.”


“Shrewdly figured,” said the soldier, looking back to the vast, unlit villa. “He’ll think nothing out of order then when he sees no attendants.”


“But monkeys can be terribly hard to catch,” said the merchant. “Would you forget about the monkey,” growled the soldier.

“I told him that my daughter is terrified of monkeys, could not


be in the same room with one.”

“But she isn’t here,” said the merchant.

“The fool doesn’t know that,” said the soldier. “Our brave Mon-


tressor will cast his younger daughter as bait, even after having the eldest stolen from the hook by a blackfish.”


“The senator’s loss cuts deep enough without your barbs,” said the merchant. “Do we not pursue the same purpose? Your wit is too mean to be clever, merely crude and cruel.”


“But, sweet Antonio,” said the soldier. “I am at once clever, crude, and cruel—all assets to your endeavor. Or would you rather partner with the kindly edge of a more courtly sword?” He laid his hand on the hilt of his sword.





The merchant looked out over the water.

“I thought not,” said the soldier.

“Put on friendly faces, you two.” The senator stepped between


them and squinted into the night. “The fool’s boat approaches. There!”


Amid the fishing boats a bright lantern drifted, and slowly broke rank as the gondola moved toward them. In a moment it was glid- ing into the dock, the gondolier so precise in his handling of the oar that the black boat stopped with its rails only a handsbreadth from the dock. A louvered hatch clacked open and out of the cabin stepped a wiry little man dressed in the black-and-silver motley and mask of a harlequin. By his size, one might have thought him a boy, but the oversize codpiece and the shadow of a beard on his cheek betrayed his years.


“One lantern?” said the harlequin, hopping up onto the dock. “You couldn’t have spared an extra torch or two, Brabantio? It’s dark as night’s own nutsack out here.” He breezed by the soldier and the merchant. “Toadies,” he said, nodding to them. Then he was on his way up the path to the villa, pumping a puppet-headed jester’s scepter as he went. The senator tottered along behind him, holding the lantern high to light their way.


“It’s an auspicious night, Fortunato,” said the senator. “And I sent the servants away before nightfall so—”


“Call me Pocket,” said the fool. “Only the dge calls me Fortu- nato. Wonder that’s not his nickname for everyone, bloody bung- fingered as he is at cards.”


At the dock, the soldier again laid hand on sword hilt, saying, “By the saints, I would run my blade up through his liver right now, and lift him on it just to watch that arrogant grin wither as he twitched. Oh how I do hate the fool.”


The merchant smiled and talked through his teeth as he pressed the soldier’s sword hand down, throwing a nod toward the gondo- lier, who was standing on his boat, waiting. “As do I, in this pan-




tomime we perform for Carnival, he is our jibing clown. Ha! The Punchinello in our little puppet show, all in good fun, am I right?” The soldier looked to the boatman and forced a grin. “Quite right. All in good cheer. I play my part too well. One moment, signor. I will have your instructions.” He turned and called up the


path. “Montressor! The gondolier?”

“Pay him and tell him to go, be merry, and return at midnight.” “You heard him,” said the soldier. “Go celebrate, but not so much


that you cannot steer. I would sleep in my own bed this night. Pay him, Antonio.” The soldier turned and headed up the path.


“Me? Why is it always me?” He dug into his purse. “Very well, then.” The merchant tossed a coin to the gondolier, who snatched it out of the air and bowed his head in thanks. “Midnight then.”


“Midnight, signor,” said the gondolier, who twisted his oar, sending the gondola sliding away from the dock silent and smooth as a knife through the night.


Outside the grand entrance of the palazzo the fool paused. “What’s that above your door, Montressor?” There was a coat of arms inlaid in the marble, ensconced in shadow. The senator held up his lantern, illuminating the crest, showing the relief of a man’s foot in gold, trampling a jade serpent, even as its fangs pierced the heel.


“My family crest,” said the senator.


“Reckon they were all out of proper dragons and lions down at the crest shop so you had to settle for this toss, eh?”


“Think they’d have thrown in a fleur-de-lis,” said the fool’s puppet stick, in a voice just a note above the fool’s own. “Mon- tressor’s fucking French, innit?”


The senator whirled around to face the puppet. “Montressor is a title bestowed upon me by the doge. It means ‘my treasure’ and notes that he holds me highest in regard of the six senators of the high council. This is the crest of the family Brabantio, one our family has worn with pride for four hundred years. Do note the




motto, fool, ‘Nemo me impune lacessit.’ ” He bounced the lantern with each syllable as he read through gritted teeth. “It means, no one attacks me with impunity.”


“Well, that’s not fucking French,” said the puppet, turning to look at the fool.


“No,” said the fool. “The puppet Jones is quite fluent in fucking French,” he explained to the senator.


“But Montressor is French, right?”

“Froggy as a summer day on the Seine,” said the fool. “Thought so,” said the puppet.

“Stop talking to that puppet!” barked the senator.

“Well, you were just shouting at him,” said the fool.

“And now I’m shouting at you! You are working the puppet’s


mouth and giving it voice.”

“No!” said the puppet, his wooden jaw agape, looking to the


fool, then to the senator, then back to the fool. “This bloody toss- bobbin is running things?”


The fool nodded; the bells on his hat jingled earnestly.


The puppet turned to the senator. “Well, if you’re going to be a bastard about it, your bloody motto is nicked.”


“What?” said the senator.


“Plagiarized,” said the fool, still nodding solemnly, the bringer of sad news.


The merchant and the soldier had caught up to them and could see that their host was incensed, so they stood at the bottom of the steps, watching. The soldier’s hand fell to the hilt of his sword.


“It’s the Scottish motto, innit?” said the puppet. “Bloody Order of the Fistle.”


“It’s true,” said the fool. “Although it’s ‘Thistle,’ not Fistle, Jones, you Cockney berk.”


“What I said,” said the puppet Jones. “Piss off.”


The fool glared at the puppet, then turned back to the senator. “Same motto is inscribed over the entrance to Edinburgh Castle.”






“You must be remembering it wrong. It is in Latin.”


“Indeed,” said the fool. “And I am raised by nuns in the bosom of the church. Could speak and write Latin and Greek before I could see over the table. No, Montressor, your motto couldn’t be more Scottish if it was painted blue and smelled of burning peat and your ginger sister.”


“Stolen,” said the puppet. “Pilfered. Swiped. Filched, as it fuck- ing were. A motto most used, defiled, and besmirched.”


“Besmirched?” said the fool. “Really?”


The puppet nodded furiously on the end of his stick. The fool shrugged to the senator. “A right shite crest and a motto most be- smirched, Montressor. Let’s hope this amontillado you’ve prom- ised can comfort us in our disappointment.”


The merchant stepped up then and put his hand on the fool’s shoulder. “Then let’s waste no more time out here in the mist. To the senator’s cellar and his cask of exquisite amontillado.”


“Yes,” said the senator. He stepped through the doorway into a grand foyer, took tapers from a credenza, lit them from his lan- tern, and handed one to each of his guests. “Mind your step,” said the senator. “We’ll be going down ancient stairs to the very lowest levels of the palazzo. Some will be quite low, so, Antonio, Iago, watch your head.”


“Did he just besmirch our height?” asked the puppet.


“Can’t say,” said the fool. “I’m not entirely sure I know what ‘besmirched’ means. I’ve just been going along with you because I thought you knew what you were talking about.”


“Quiet, flea,” growled the soldier.

“That there’s a besmirchin’, ” said the puppet.

“Oh, well, yes then,” said the fool. He raised his taper high, illu-


minating a thick coat of mold on the low ceiling. “So, Montressor, is the lovely Portia waiting down here in the dark?”


“I’m afraid my youngest daughter will not be joining us. She’s gone to Florence to buy shoes.”




They entered a much wider vault now, with casks set into the walls on one side, racks of dusty bottles on the other; a long oak table and high-backed chairs ran down the middle. The senator lit lanterns around the chamber until the entire room was bathed in a warm glow that belied the dampness that permeated the cellar.


“Just as well,” said the fool. “She’s just be whingeing about the dark and the damp and how Iago reeks of squid and we’d never get any proper drinking done.”


“What?” said the soldier.


The fool leaned into Antonio and bounced his eyebrows so they showed above his black mask. “Don’t get me wrong, Portia’s a lus- cious little fuck-bubble to be sure, but prickly as a gilded hedgehog when she doesn’t get her way.”


The senator looked up with murderous fire in his eyes, then quickly looked down and shuddered, almost, it seemed, with plea- sure.


“I do not reek of squid,” said the soldier, as if overcome by a rare moment of self-consciousness. He sniffed at the shoulder of his cape, and finding no squidish aroma, returned his attention to the senator.


“If you’d be so kind as to decant the amontillado, Iago,” said the senator, “we can be about getting the opinion of this distinguished connoisseur.”


“I never said I was a connoisseur, Montressor. I just said I’d had it before and it was the mutt’s nuts.”


“The dog’s bollocks,” said the puppet, clarifying.


“When you were king of Spain, correct?” said the merchant, with a grin and a sarcastic roll of the eye toward the senator.


“I’ve had various titles,” said Fortunato. “Only fool seems con- stant.”


The soldier cradled the heavy cask under his arm as if he was strangling a bull-necked enemy and filled a delicate Murano glass pitcher with the amber liquid.






The senator said: “The wine dealer has five more casks coming from Spain. If you pronounce it genuine, I’ll buy the others and have one sent round to you in thanks.”


“Let’s have a taste, then,” said the fool. “Although, without it’s poured by a properly wanton, olive-skinned serving wench, you can’t really call it authentic, but I suppose Iago will have to suffice.”


“Won’t be the first time he’s filled that role, I’ll wager,” said the puppet Jones. “Lonely nights in the field, and whatnot.”


The soldier grinned, set the cask on the table, and with a nod from the senator poured the sherry into four heavy glass tumblers with pewter bases cast in the shape of winged lions.


“To the republic,” said the senator, raising his glass.

“To the Assumption,” said the merchant. “To Carnival!”

“To Venice,” said the soldier.

“To the delicious Desdemona,” said the fool.

And the merchant nearly choked as he looked to the senator,


who calmly drank, then lowered his glass to the table, never look- ing from the fool.


“Well?”


The fool swished the liquid in his cheeks, rolled his eyes at the ceiling in consideration then swallowed as if enduring an espe- cially noxious medicine. He shuddered and looked over the rim of his glass at the senator. “I’m not sure,” he said.


“Well, sit, try a bit more,” said the merchant. “Sometimes the first drink only clears the dust of the day off a man’s palate.”


The fool sat, as did the others. They all drank again. The glasses clunked down. The three looked to the fool.


“Well?” asked Iago.


“Montressor, you’ve been had,” said the fool. “This is not amon- tillado.”


“It’s not?” said the senator.

“Tastes perfect to me,” said the merchant.

“No, it’s not amontillado,” said the fool. “And I can see from




your face that you are neither surprised nor disappointed. So while we quaff this imposter—which tastes a bit of pitch, if you ask me— shall we turn to your darker purpose? The real reason we are all here.” The fool drained his glass, leaned on the table, and rolled his eyes coyly at the senator in the manner of a flirting teenage girl. “Shall we?”


The soldier and the merchant looked to the senator, who smiled. “Our darker purpose?” asked the senator.

“Tastes of pitch?” asked the merchant.

“Not to me,” said the soldier, now looking at his glass.


“Do you think me a fool?” said the fool. “Don’t answer that. I mean, do you think me foolish? An ill-formed question as well.” He looked at his hand and seemed surprised to find it at the end of his wrist, then looked back to the senator. “You brought me here to convince me to rally the doge for you, to back another holy war.”


“No,” said the senator.

“No? You don’t want a bloody war?”

“Well, yes,” said the soldier. “But that’s not why we’ve brought


you here.”

“Then you wish me to entreat my friend Othello to back you all


in a Crusade, from which you all may profit. I knew it when I got the invitation.”


“Hadn’t thought about it,” said the senator. “More sherry?”


The fool adjusted his hat, and when the bells jingled he fol- lowed one around with his eyes and nearly went over backward in his chair.


Antonio, the merchant, steadied the fool, and patted his back to reassure him.


The fool pulled away, and regarded the merchant, looking him not just in the eye, but around the eyes, as if they were windows to a dark house and he was looking for someone hiding inside.


“Then you don’t want me to use my influence in France and England to back a war?”






The merchant shook his head and smiled.

“Oh balls, it’s simple revenge then?”

Antonio and Iago nodded.

The fool regarded the senator, and seemed to have difficulty


focusing on the graybeard. “Everyone knows I’m here. Many saw me board the gondola to come here.”


“And they will see a fool return,” said the senator.

“I am a favorite of the doge,” slurred the fool “He adores me.” “That is the problem,” said the senator.

In a single motion the fool leapt from his chair to the middle


of the table, reached into the small of his back, and came up with a wickedly pointed throwing dagger, which caught his eye as it flashed in his hand before him. He wobbled and shook his head as if to clear his vision.


“Poison?” he said, somewhat wistfully. “Oh, fuckstockings, I am slain—”


His eyes rolled back in his head, his knees buckled, and he fell face forward on the table with a thump and a rattle of his blade across the floor.


The three looked from the prostrate Fortunato to each other.


The soldier felt the fool’s neck for a pulse. “He’s alive, but I can remedy that.” He reached for his dagger.


“No,” said the senator. “Help me get him out of his clothes and to a deeper section of the cellar, then take your leave. You last saw him alive, and you can swear on your soul that is all you know.”


Antonio the merchant sighed. “It’s sad we must kill the little fool, who, while wildly annoying, does seem to bring mirth and merriment to those around him. Yet I suppose if there is a ducat to be made, it must be made. If a profit blossoms, so must a merchant pluck it.”


“Duty to God, profit, and the republic!” said the senator.


“Many a fool has found his end trying to resist the wind of war,” said Iago. “So shall this one.


 








CHAPTER TWO


The Dark






What are you doing?” I asked.

“I’m walling you up in the dungeon,” said the senator, who crouched in the arched doorway to the chamber in which I was chained to the wall.


“No you’re not,” said I.


Indeed, it appeared that he was walling me up, but I wasn’t going to concede that simply because I was chained, naked, and water was rising about my feet. Cautious I was not to instill a sense of confidence in my enemy.


“I am,” said he. “Brick by brick. The first masonry I’ve done since I was a lad, but it comes back. I was ten, I think, when I helped the mason who was building my father’s house. Not this one, of course. This house has been in the family for centuries. And I think I was less help than in his way, but alas, I learned.”


“Well, you couldn’t possibly have been more annoying then than you are now, so do get on with it.”


The senator stabbed his trowel into a bucket of mortar with such enthusiasm that he might have been spearing my liver. Then he held his lamp through the doorway into my little chamber,




which he had already bricked up to just above his knees. By the lamplight I saw I was in a passageway barely two yards wide, that sloped downward into the dark water, which was now washing about my ankles. There was a high-tide line on the wall, about the level of my chest.


“You know you’re going to die here, Fortunato?”


“Pocket,” I corrected. “You’re mad, Brabantio. Deluded, para- noid, and irritatingly grandiose.”


“You’ll die. Alone. In the dark.” He tamped down a brick with the butt of his trowel.


“Senile, probably. It comes early to the inbred or the syphilitic.”


“The crabs won’t even wait for you to stop moving before they begin to clean your bones.”


“Ha!” said I.

“What do you mean, ‘Ha’?” said Brabantio.

“You’ve played right into my hands!”


____________________


So there you go. The rest will be in stores April 22nd, 2014


Merry Christmas and Happy New Year


-Chris


 



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Published on December 24, 2013 17:55 • 1,099 views

October 25, 2013

Hey kids, Books Inc is providing signed copies of my books for the Holidays.


The Lamb will be the “leather” gift edtion, Sacré Bleu is the special first edtion signed, and The Stupidest Angel has the bonus chapter included in version 2.0.


Books Inc will ship to Canada and Europe, but it’s going to be expensive.


http://www.booksinc.net/christopher-moore-signed


Quanties are limited, especially on the Sacré Bleu firsts, so don’t wait too long.


 


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Published on October 25, 2013 09:28 • 520 views

July 1, 2012

Hey kids, one more event for my pals at the Capitola Book Cafe in Capitola (Santa Cruz, CA). It’s a benefit to try to save one of the coolest book stores on the planet, and I’ll be talking and signing and fun will be had. July 14th, 2012 – 2:00 PM. http://www.capitolabookcafe.com/


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Published on July 01, 2012 16:44 • 635 views

June 6, 2012

I was 12, and although I’d been reading voraciously since I was six, I don’t think it ever occurred to me that there was someone actually telling the stories. Then I read a book called “R is for Rocket,” and before I’d finished, I picked up “S is for Space,” the “The Martian Chronicles” and so it went. Maybe because the books were of short stories, maybe because they were so masterfully crafted, but I suddenly realized that there was an artist there, behind the stories, putting them together, making me grin and shiver with fear and delight, leading me down the path of outrageous imagination to other worlds, times, and consciousnesses.Ray Bradbury made me aware of the art and craft of fiction, and soon thereafter I realized that I wanted to be that guy, the teller of stories. To this day, I will look to his stories for clues for how to better perform my craft. You need go no further than Bradbury’s “The Fog Horn”, about a lonesome sea monster that falls in love with a fog horn see Ray’s direct influence on my work. I read it a dozen times when I was writing The Lust Lizard of Melancholy Cove.The first time of many that I heard Ray speak, at the Santa Barbara Writer’s conference in 1982, he said, “If a writer introduces an idea, then leaves in lying there, doesn’t do anything with it, then it’s yours. It’s yours, to do with what you want!” He had a breathy, conspiratorial way of talking to an audience — a sort of, “isn’t it cool! isn’t it amazing!? aren’t we lucky!?” way of talking about writing.

Yes, Ray, it is. It is! We are!

Thanks for the sea monster, Ray. Thanks for turning on the light so I could write.


Ray Bradbury was bright champion of imagination, an inspiration and an icon. He shall be so ever after.





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Published on June 06, 2012 11:21 • 740 views

March 29, 2012

Signed First Editions of Sacre Bleu


Books will be shipped from Books Inc on or after April 3rd, from Mysterious Galaxy after April 9th when I appear there. Mysterious Galaxy will get any of my books on the linked page signed for you. Remember, only the first printing of Sacré Bleu will have color art and print. After they it will be in black and white, so jump on these if you're not near a tour city.


Signed Sacre Bleu firsts as well as other titles. (Contact store if something you want isn't listed.) Also, international readers should order from Mysterious Galaxy, below. Their shipping is significantly less expensive for international orders. Yes, including Canada.)


International and Canadian Buyers read this note from Mysterious Galaxy:


Keep in mind that shipping charges for foreign orders are set by the system and are often adjusted down to reflect actual charges. One copy of Chris's book to Canada is $12.95 and to most of Europe and Australia is $16.95 in a priority envelop according to the USPS website. If the charge to your country is more than $16.95 US, we will contact you.


Signed Sacre Bleu, shipped first day of publication, April 3rd


http://www.booksinc.net/ChrisMooreSigned


Signed Sacre Bleu firsts as well as other titles. (Contact store if something you want isn't listed.)


www.mystgalaxy.com/event/christopher-moore-signs-sd-040912


 


 


 


 


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Published on March 29, 2012 13:51 • 862 views

March 22, 2012

            Since I announced my 2012 book tour, a lot of people have been asking, "What goes on at a book-signing?"  The following answers apply only to MY events, book-signings by other authors are different. For instance, while there is no real "appropriate" attire for one of my events, if you're at a Chuck Palahniuk event, you'll want to wear your best bondage-wear (leather or PVC), and carry plastic sheeting. Chuck's events are very much like a Gallagher comedy act, except in place of watermelons, human body parts are splattered on the audience, which is why Chuck is America's most beloved author. That said, while you may have to stand in line unattended at one of my signings, at Neil Gaiman events there are "line monitors," burly security guys who are there to catch Goth girls (and boys) who faint over Neil's dreaminess.  At a Lemony Snicket event, you might be entertained by Toccata and Fugue played on an accordion and encouraged to murder your parents (or at least frame them for embezzlement, ) while at one of my events, the closest you'll come to being entertained is watching me swig Nyquil while spooging hand-sand on myself and others in a series of anti-viral "money-shots".


So, to your questions:


 


1)What is the most important thing to consider in coming to one of your events?


1)ans: Parking. This is doubly important if you are driving.


 


2)Do I have to buy a book to attend?


2)ans: Most stores, now, require you buy at least one book per group, or a ticket, which usually includes a book. This varies from store to store and you should call the store and ask before betting your whole afternoon or evening on it. I've listed all of their contact information on Google.


 


3)Can I get your other books signed, my older books?


3)Yes, but often I have to limit how many I can personalize, especially if there's a big crowd. The store my require that you buy the new one there, but most are okay if you bring your old books, and I'll sign all that you bring. It helps if you have them turned to the "title page", which is the first page on which my name appears. Collectors and dealers who have a bunch of books are asked to wait until the end and — access to the author for dealers is up to the discretion of the event store. (If you're a dealer or a collector, you probably know this.)


 


4)I don't know what to say. It's my big moment, I've been waiting in line, and I don't know what to say…


4) Most authors have been on your side of the table and know what that is like.  I remember being terrified to speak to Ray Bradbury, and later Harlan Ellison. Hell, even now I get nervous when I meet authors. We get it. We also have all done events where no one but the bookstore staff was there, so we're grateful you're there. No author doesn't like to hear that you love his or her books, that you share them with friends. It doesn't get old, and it's exactly the thing to say. I appreciate it. On the other hand, don't pitch your idea for a screenplay or novel. I am powerless to help you and there are people waiting.


 


5)You like pie. Can I bring you pie? Or, you know, a meerkat?


5)Presents are very sweet, but an author on tour usually has one carry-on bag and his or her version of a computer bag – for the whole month, which means things are packed to the max. We just don't have room to take along gifts, nor the time to send them on or even eat snacks.  (I've even run out of room to carry my receipts and had to ship them home mid-way through the tour.) I've left a multitude of thoughtful gifts in hotel rooms because I couldn't get them into my bag. That goes double for books and regional delicacies like bar-b-que sauce or maple syrup. (We're getting on a plane in the morning, remember?)  We just don't have room for them. I have had many dinners consisting entirely of goldfish crackers brought to me by readers, and I really thank you for that, but it's probably not the best policy. CDs and Manuscripts are out of the question. First, I can't read manuscripts even if I want to, agents orders, and I don't travel with a CD player, not even in my computer, so the discs often have to be left behind a stop or two down the road, anyway.


 


6)What can we expect? Do you read your work? Give back-rubs? What's up?


6) The main thing to remember is, LOWER YOUR EXPECTATIONS. I'm a writer, if I was a people person they wouldn't lock me in a room by myself to do my job. I don't read my stuff. I suck at it. That said, there's some variation in how events proceed– especially this tour, since some events are in theaters, but usually a bunch of you sit down, someone introduces me, I talk about writing books and stuff for about 20-40 minutes, take some questions, and then I sign books. Each book store has a different way of managing the line. Some have tickets, or bookmarks, or wrist-bands, other's go by the "dog-pile" approach. At some events, I will have signed all of the books in advance so you'll get a signed book even if you don't have time to stand in line. We started doing this a couple of books ago when I'd get letters from people who had come but had to leave because of a baby-sitter or something before they got to meet me and get their book signed. You can still stand in line and I'll personalize your book, but usually in these cases, the line is shorter because those people who just wanted to hear me talk or get a signed book can bolt.


 


7)What sort of questions should we ask?


7)Not "Where do you get your ideas?"  (Now that I've told you that, I know that the first question will always be, "Where do you get your ideas?" because, let's face it, my work appeals to the smart-ass demographic, but I'm going to just tell you "From Jules Verne", or "from Bazooka Joe Comics" or something equally absurd, so whatever…) The one thing I ask is that as the tour proceeds, and you've had time to read the book, is you not ask something that's a "spoiler" for those who haven't had a chance to read it yet. Oh, no movies are being made of my books. If that changes, I'll let you know.


 


8)What else do we need to know?


8)Most anything else should be addressed to the specific book store, because they really dictate the policy for events. Call them. They'll know about parking, places to eat near-by, stuff like that.  My advice, on meals, by the way, is on an evening event, eat before you come to the book store. I do. Sometimes these things can run late.


 


9)Will you sign other stuff?


9)I will, but it's limited. It takes quite a while to sign fabric items, I have to go slow, so be considerate of your line homeys when you ask. Fucksox are nearly impossible, so let's not go there.  Body parts are also really tough. (I can't believe I'm actually typing this.) I know you'd love to have a tattoo on your uvula of my signature, but as I cherish the fun of poking you in the uvula with a Sharpie, may I suggest getting something else signed, like tracing paper or clear plastic, and taking that to your tattoo artist. That way, too, you can sober up and think it through.


 


10)What about pictures?


10) I'm fine with you taking pictures with me. Sometimes the store will have someone who will help – take your phone or camera so you can get in the picture—but sometimes, not, so you'll want to have stuff ready. If the store doesn't have someone, then make friends with the person in line behind you to take the shot – show them how to use your phone, get it all set up. The we'll all dogpile into the photo and it will be tons of fun.




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Published on March 22, 2012 13:27 • 434 views