Rick Riordan's Blog, page 5

November 14, 2013


A quick update on Percy Jackson's Greek Gods, my collection of original Greek myths told from Percy Jackson's point of view. The US release date has been set for Tuesday, August 19, the day after Percy's birthday! Book releases are always slated for Tuesdays, for sales and marketing reasons I do not pretend to understand, so that's the closest date we could make it. No word on release dates in other countries yet. I don't usually get that information, but if I do, I will let you know.

Anyway, what a great way to celebrate Percy's birthday! Mark your calendars. Plan your blue cake and ice cream celebrations, and get ready for over four hundred pages of Percy telling you all the stories about the major gods in his own sarcastic and irreverent way. The book is filled with full-color illustrations by John Rocco, and the ones I've seen so far are AMAZING.

As if you needed another reason to look forward to summer, right?

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Published on November 14, 2013 08:34 • 3,759 views

October 25, 2013



Last month I had the opportunity to chat via email with my friend and colleague Jonathan Stroud on the occasion of his newest publication: Lockwood & Co.: The Screaming Staircase. If you haven't yet picked up a copy, do so immediately. It's brilliant. 
Below is the interview in full. I had so much fun talking with Jonathan. It's not often I get to compare notes with another writer about how the creative writing process works. I hope you enjoy!
Rick Riordan/Jonathan Stroud       Q&A  
Jonathan: Hi Rick. Well, it’s a real joy to have this conversation with you. I saw you give a terrific speech at the US Book Expo earlier this summer, and I really regretted not having a chance to chat with you then. I don’t know about you, but one of the things I find about being a writer is that it’s a pretty hectic business. If we’re not zooming about doing events, we’re back at home, chained to our desks by our cruel editors and scribbling hard. In short, the opportunities to sit down and chew the fat with fellow authors are fairly few and far between. Whenever I do get the chance to hear another writer speak about their craft, I always find it fascinating, so I’m hopping with delight at the prospect of getting some fantastic insights (no pressure) from the author of Percy Jackson.
Rick: Thanks, Jonathan! Great to talk with you. I’m not sure I’ve ever told you this, but back in 2003, while I was writing The Lightning Thief, I walked into my local bookstore and saw The Amulet of Samarkand prominently displayed. I bought it immediately and loved it. I noticed Miramax (Disney-Hyperion) was your American publisher, and I was so impressed that they would publish such great fantasy I ended up choosing them at auction to publish Percy Jackson. I’ve never regretted it!
Jonathan: Okay, so the first thing I’d like to know is pretty simple. Tell me about your working day. I once met a distinguished fantasy author who said that she only ever wrote when the muse took her. She claimed she never just sat down and worked at it. I’ve got to say that I was sceptical: for me the muse is secondary to the importance of just keeping my backside in my chair for a certain number of hours each day. What about you? Are you the kind of guy who likes a settled routine, who starts and finishes his writing at regular hours, and who enjoys a cup of coffee at the same time every morning? Or are you more instinctive, going with the flow when the fires burn hot?
Rick: I wish I were a creature of habit. I really do. It might make my work schedule more predictable. Unfortunately I have yet to discover what a ‘typical’ writing day looks like for me. I try to write every day. That’s about as much as I can tell you. Sometimes that means fifteen minutes. Sometimes it means fifteen hours. That’s not to say I have no system or that I wait for inspiration to strike. My method for creating a book over the course of a year is more or less consistent. In the early stages of a manuscript, I spend a couple of months researching and outlining and just thinking about the scenes I want to create. That’s fairly light work, so I’m not at my desk all day. Once I get into the first draft, I’ll spend four or five hours a day writing, though again that varies widely. I’m much too ADHD to sit at my desk for five hours straight. I’m a ‘hit and run’ writer. I’ll write a few pages, get up and do some chores, take the dog for a walk, and come back later. When I get into the second and third drafts, the work gets real. That’s when I get laser-focused and can spend ten to fifteen hours at a time polishing and tweaking.
Now a question back to you: Have you found that your writing process has evolved over the years? I have yet to find the perfect system, or even a system that makes writing less painful and difficult, but certainly I’ve changed the way I operate drastically since I wrote my first novel. What about you?
Jonathan: I’d like to claim that I’m getting more efficient at writing novels, but it certainly doesn’t always feel that way! Like you, I tend to spend the early stages of a project writing notes, doing research, pondering different structures. I think of this as the ‘cappuccino stage’ because it slightly lends itself to that cliché of the writer (probably wearing a black roll-neck sweater or cravat or something) hanging around cafés, scribbling casually in notebooks. For me, this stage tends to merge into a sort of ‘phoney war’ phase, where I write quite a few random scenes, testing the waters, seeing which characters or concepts ignite. Then I start to put the first draft together in earnest. I always feel that it would be better to skip the phoney war bit altogether and just get on with things, but somehow I never seem to quite manage it. But I do think I’m slowly getting better at recognising quickly what does and doesn’t work, and I’m much more ruthless than I used to be at tossing aside ideas that fail. For me everything ultimately revolves around a pretty intensive few months when I’m constructing the first draft. During this phase I’ll aim for (and generally fail to achieve) 25 pages a week: the more momentum I can get, the better the results tend to be.
That whole ‘inspiration versus routine’ thing we discussed earlier is at the heart of my next question too. One thing that I’m really fascinated by, because it gives me continual problems, is how other writers balance plot and improvisation. For me there’s an endless tension between the side of my brain that wants to order things and create lovely neat chapter plans in advance, and the side that wants to freewheel into scenes, just letting my characters chat or bicker, and seeing where that takes me. Many of the things I’m proudest of in my books (silly jokes, rich details) appear unexpectedly as I write, and quite often they alter the whole direction of the story, which irritates the ‘orderly’ side of my brain no end! I end up sort of zigzagging between these opposites, frantically rigging up possible new structures before being carried off again on a slightly variant path. How does it work for you? Do you draw up detailed plans at the outset of each novel and then stick to them, or do you find yourself veering off course?
Rick: I can relate to that dilemma. And you have those fabulous footnotes from Bartimaeus pulling you in different directions, too! I outline each book beforehand, knowing full well that I won’t completely stick to the plan. My outlines are loose, which helps. I usually sketch out a paragraph for each chapter with the basic ingredients: location, characters involved, and which mythological monster or situation they will face. Location is very important to me. As my books tend to be geographic odysseys, I spend a lot of time thinking about where to take my characters and how that locale will affect the action. The details of each chapter, however, develop organically, and with every book, the plot takes turns I didn’t expect. That’s okay with me. In fact it’s one of the joys of writing. When all the elements come together, it’s like alchemy – creating something that somehow is greater than the sum of its parts.
Did you have some of those “Aha!” moments when you were writing Lockwood & Co.? I imagine you must have. It’s such a vibrant world you’ve created. Did any pieces click together even better than you’d hoped, or did anything about Lucy’s world develop in a way you didn’t expect?
Jonathan: You’re so right about the wondrous alchemy of writing. I love those days where you unexpectedly strike gold. It could be just a couple of great lines: that’s all you need to make everything feel worthwhile.
I think the ‘Aha’ moments tend to strike most often when you put two characters together and just let them talk. I bet you’ve had that when you got Percy bantering with Annabeth, say, or when he faces off against one or other of the gods. For me, Lockwood & Co ignited with my two young paranormal investigators just standing on the doorstep of a haunted house, having a conversation. They bicker gently, name-drop ghosts they’ve fought, try to mask their rising tension with a few jokes. Those couple of pages were enough to get me excited: I immediately wanted to find out more. For a long while I didn’t have a clue how this world actually worked, though, and I had to write quite a few scenes to help figure it out. Sometimes (for example a chapter where Lucy has various awful interviews with other paranormal agencies) they didn’t end up featuring in the book itself, but they were essential to make the world more concrete in my mind.
One of the great delights of your universe is the lovely fusion of the modern world with the mythic (I still chuckle at the fact that you get to the Underworld via Los Angeles!). When I was a kid I liked nothing better than reading about entirely invented fantasy lands, preferably brought to life with sprawling Tolkienesque maps. These days, though, and certainly as a writer, I’ve found that I instinctively prefer fantasy that keeps one foot in the real world. Somehow it makes the magical stuff more memorable and meaningful if it’s anchored in the everyday (and vice versa). In many ways Percy J himself – half ordinary kid, half most certainly not – symbolises this division perfectly. In my Bartimaeus books, Nathaniel and Bart are opposites driven together too. Anyway, were you a big fantasy fan, growing up? (I’m guessing so!) And have you also felt the same slight shift in emphasis over the years – the need to keep in touch with ordinary things?
Rick: The rise of ‘urban fantasy’ is a fascinating subject. That’s one of things I love about your work, too. The Bartimaeus books are set in London, and yet that familiar landscape is rendered into something much more fantastical. I’ll never look at Westminster Abbey the same way again. In your new series Lockwood & Co., we’re clearly in modern England, but then again, we’re not. Ghosts run rampant and children with rapiers patrol the haunted streets. I love the juxtaposition of familiar and strange.
Like you, I grew up with high fantasy. I had Tolkien’s map of Middle Earth taped to my bedroom wall. I would spend hours drawing my own maps of fantasy worlds. But when it came time to write Percy Jackson, I instinctively set it in modern Manhattan. I liked the idea of updating Greek mythology for a modern audience. The old stories are just so . . . well, old.I wanted to find a way to make them seem fresh and relevant for an audience of kids who find anything from before last month to be ancient history. I suppose the idea of fantasy set in the ‘real world’ isn’t new. We have Lucy slipping into the wardrobe during World War II. We’ve got Wendy Darling flying out of her Victorian bedroom to Never Never Land. One of the first modern urban fantasies I read was Little, Big by John Crowley and it blew my mind. Still, I agree that urban fantasy seems to be the new normal. I’m not sure why that is, but I agree it’s probably the appeal of opposites attracting. A Minotaur destroying a Cretan maze? Yawn. A Minotaur destroying the Brooklyn Bridge? Now that’s interesting!
I’m curious, too, about how you chose the setting for Lockwood & Co. Chronologically, it seems a fascinating mix of modern and Victorian, and the haunted Britain you’ve conjured up is a wonderfully creepy place. For you, how did developing this world compare to, say, the world of Heroes of the Valley, or the Bartimaeus books?
Jonathan: For me, figuring out how a new world works is one of the real highlights of the job. It’s so crucial too: I think one of the ironies of writing good fantasy is that it has to abide by its own laws – it must make sense under its own terms. These background rules take time to develop: I was still uncovering new secrets of Bartimaeus’s and Nathaniel’s worlds when writing the third book in that series, and there are plenty of things about Lockwood’s London that I don’t yet fully understand (don’t tell my editors this). With Heroes I was pretty sure from the outset that I wanted something set in a sort-of Viking age, but Lockwood’s exact period was more taxing. Should it be modern or Victorian? In the end I decided it was essentially modern (trainers, jeans, TVs), but set in a world without today’s zippy telecommunications (ie. no cell-phones for getting you out of a tight spot). Oh, and with a raging epidemic of ghosts. That’s enough to get me leaping out of bed in the mornings.
Both of us write extended series of books, and both of us benefit from the fun to be had with developing an extended universe across several titles. I’m wise to those possibilities now, but with The Amulet of Samarkand, I was a good sixty pages or so into the story before I realised that I simply had too many characters, plot threads and perspectives to cram into one book. I had to stop, sit back, and rework the concept into a trilogy before I could continue. What about you? When you were writing Lightning Thief, at what point did you know that it was the start of something so epic?
Rick: Well, as a reader, I’m certainly glad you continued beyond one book! I’ve always preferred reading series, whether detective fiction or fantasy or science fiction. I feel somewhat cheated if I invest my time getting to know the characters and the carefully crafted world in a novel, and then I’m never allowed to visit again. So for me, there was never any doubt Percy Jackson would be a series. That’s simply my default setting. The only question was how many books I would write. Because I like series, I do have to think long and hard about which projects to tackle next, because I won’t be committing to just one novel. I’ll be spending 3-5 years creating a multi-book arc.
And what about Lockwood & Co.? Do you have a definite number of books in mind for Lucy and the gang, or do you let the greater story arc develop organically as you go?
Jonathan: I’m currently thinking at least four books for Lockwood, possibly five. I’ve got the story arc scribbled down on the equivalent of the back of napkin: just a raw sentence or two for each book. The details of each one remain completely open at this stage – they’ll develop organically as I go. I know exactly what you mean about the pleasure of reading a great series, by the way: you can just immerse yourself in what the writer’s created for you. There’s a lovely sense of generosity about the whole experience.
I’m looping back into the mists of time for this question. I’d like to know how it all began for you. When I was a kid I was always scribbling something – comics, stories, games, drawings – and as the long-suffering audiences who’ve come to my events will know, I’ve still got the tattered originals to prove it. Looking back on it, I clearly always had the itch to write, but I didn’t fully appreciate this until my mid-20s, when I got my first books published. With the benefit of hindsight, do you think your path was always mapped out? Have you always been a writer, even when you were officially doing other things?
Rick: I knew early on that I wanted to write, from about age twelve. I would design my own comic books and sketch ideas for fantasy series. I drew maps, too, although sadly I have no artistic talent whatsoever. Most of my stories were bad knock-offs of Lord of the Rings. I guess today we’d call it ‘fan fiction.’ Back then it was just, ‘I don’t have any original ideas so I’ll just use that guy’s!’ Still, it did teach me a lot about writing. I was also an avid player of Dungeons and Dragons. Laugh if you will, but my years as a dungeon master taught me a lot about crafting a story and keeping the elements of a fantasy novel in check without letting the magical overcome the realistic. Or at least, so I like to hope . . .
Still, I had the urge to be a writer long before I had anything worthwhile to say. I had to forget I wanted to get published and simply practice my craft until the right story came along. Then, when the time was right and the story was right, I found my first novel. It was a reassuringly ‘Zen’ experience.
I’ve noticed that visual art is important for you. It’s one of the trademarks of your presentations, and during the years when I was touring the UK, I would often see mementos of your visits at schools and libraries. As someone who can barely draw stick figures, I’m envious! How did you get interested in visual art as a medium, and have you ever dabbled in the world of graphic novels?
Jonathan: Wow, it’s interesting that you were into comics and role-playing games too as a kid. I’ve met quite a few other authors who were also. It reinforces my feeling that there are no hard and fast boundaries between books and other types of creative expression. As a child you move seamlessly from one medium to another, and it’s maybe only chance that dictates which one you end up doing. I tried D&D too, but could never quite get my head round the rules (or those multi-sided dice!). I ended up spending most of my time trying to create my own games. But I totally agree with you: games-design is greatpractise for a budding author. It’s got that essential mix of improvisation and structural control.
As for the art, you’re a bit overly generous about my talents! I guess I’ve always liked to sketch and do cartoons, and I think an awful lot of kids (including ones who won’t be massively into reading) enjoy it too. So I like to mix it up, and bring that element into my events wherever possible. Good cover art’s essential for a successful book, after all, so it just gives us another element to discuss. Graphic novels still interest me too. I helped collaborate on a graphic version of Amulet a few years back, and that was a wonderful experience. It was fascinating to see how the story could be successfully transferred to another medium – altered a little, but still remaining true to the essence of the book.
Influences now. I don’t mean literary – I guess that you, like me, will have read countless writers who inspired you in different ways over the years. I’m just wondering if there were any key people in your life who strongly influenced your writing, or the fact that you ended up writing at all. I had a marvellous teacher, Mr Bill Bowen, who got me standing up in front of the school, reading out my stories, when I was about 10: he, I think, gave me the confidence that I could write. There was also the Canadian writer, Douglas Hill, who wrote a terrific sci-fi series, The Last Legionary Quartet, in the late 70s: he visited my school and so entranced me that I actually sent him one of my little books. He wrote back a very kind and encouraging letter, which I’ve never forgotten. Not least, there’s my wife, Gina, who got fed up with me moaning about not having time enough to write, and told me to give up my job to make a go of it, which I’ve been doing ever since. They’re all on my list. Who would be on yours?
Rick: My parents were both teachers, and they both spent a lot of time reading to me. Their influence on my life choices – to teach and write – is hard to overestimate. When I was thirteen, I had a great English teacher Mrs. Pabst who encouraged me to send a story I’d written to a magazine. It was rejected, but that started me on the long path to becoming a writer. I firmly believe that one good teacher can change the course of a life. For me, that teacher was Mrs. Pabst. I became a middle school teacher, and later a writer, largely because of her.
A related question: you mentioned Douglas Hill’s visit to your school and how influential that was. Now that youare the visiting author, you have certainly affected the lives of many young readers and future authors. Does one encounter – either in person or by correspondence – stand out for you?
Jonathan: Curiously enough, one of the most memorable for me was an encounter with an adult reader. At an event in the USA, I met a soldier on leave from service in Afghanistan. He described a little of his experiences, and the (to me unimaginable) things he’d seen. He then said that reading my Bartimaeus books had given him a nightly respite, a few precious moments of escape. As he left, he told me he had another tour of duty starting a few days later. All my encounters with my readers affect me deeply, but meeting that guy left me particularly humbled and overwhelmed.
A careers question now! Before becoming a full-time writer I was an editor of children’s books. I never actually edited fiction – I was doing puzzle-books and non-fiction, mainly – but it taught me a bit about plonking words on paper. Best of all, it’s made me more relaxed about the whole editing process – the fact that lots of revisions and rewrites may be needed before the problems of a book are solved. So my old job has stood me in good stead. What about you? What aspects of being a teacher do you think have been most important in shaping your other career?
Rick: I never considered my teaching career as on-the-job training for writing, but in retrospect it was just that. Everything I know about the middle grade sensibility came from my fifteen years in the classroom. I learned how to keep things interesting, how to enliven dry subjects, how to use humor and sarcasm and modern references to appeal to my students. When I wrote The Lightning Thief, I imagined myself reading it to my own students after lunch, when their attention span was shortest. I wanted my book to be able to survive in the trenches of middle school, and to reach even those kids (especially those kids) who were not normally big readers.
And you? If you had been a student in my classroom, what would you’ve have been like? Were you the studious kid in the front row, or the daydreamer in the back, or something else entirely?
Jonathan: I’d have been sitting somewhere near the front, pretty studious, no real trouble, although you might have got annoyed at the amount of time I spent doing weird doodles in my rough book, or putting on silly voices with my desk-mate, Sam. I only once got a detention. Our maths teacher couldn’t keep control, and there was generally bedlam in his lessons. One day I was innocently getting on with my work, when someone chucked a large and soggy piece of bun – splat! – onto my maths book. I picked it up and furiously hurled it away over my shoulder… What can I say? It hit the teacher. When he asked who did it, dozens of fingers pointed right at me. Off to detention I had to go.
Okay, last question! I know that the Percy stories started out as tales that you told your son, Haley. When you gave your Book Expo talk, you spoke hilariously about many of the great letters you’d received from kids, and also the advice and encouragement your pupils gave you when you were starting out on Lightning Thief. So it sounds as if your audience was right there, all around you (it must have been thrilling, both for them and for you). But were you also writing for yourself, or for the child you’d been? Who are you writing for now? 
Rick: When I was a teacher, I used to say that I had to make the class fun for myself or there was no way the kids would enjoy it. The same is true of writing. I have to believe in the story I’m telling. I have to chuckle once in a while at my own stupid jokes. I have to have fun with the characters and the incredible situations. Yes, absolutely I’m trying to write books that I would’ve enjoyed as a child. Back in the 70s, I had a hunger for better entertainment. The cartoons were mostly rubbish. The fantasy novels were mostly bad imitations of Tolkien. The movies weren’t that great (until Star Wars came along) and the video games . . . well, Pongwill only take you so far. That hunger led me to create my own entertainment. I’m trying to write books that I wish I had in the 1970s but could never find.
Happily, we seem to be in the middle of a Renaissance of children’s literature. Is that your impression? Do you try to keep up with other YA/middle grade fiction, and if so, have you found any true gems recently?
Jonathan: You’re right, there’s SO much great stuff out there. It seems to me that there’s a wealth of good choices for everybody now, no matter what kind of books you enjoy. I try to keep up with my reading, but if the pile by my bed’s anything to go by, I usually seem to be a year or two behind. What have I really loved recently? Jack Gantos’s Dead End in Norvelt, which is a wonderful mix of comic characterisation, social observation and keen historical sense. Come to think of it, Gary D Schmidt’s terrific Okay for Now had the same virtues, so maybe it’s an American thing… Anyway, both books left me smiling enviously.
Phew! That’s it! Being an interviewer is an exhausting business! I had a lot of fun asking the questions, Rick, and I hope you enjoyed them too.
Rick: Thanks, Jonathan. Keep up the ghostly goodness with Lockwood & Co. This reader is anxious for more!
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Published on October 25, 2013 05:33 • 1,373 views

October 17, 2013

As announced on the House of Hades tour, I'm pleased to share the cover for Percy Jackson's Greek Gods, which will be published August 2014!

Here's a description from the publisher:

Who could tell the origin stories of the gods of Olympus better than a modern-day demigod? Percy Jackson provides an insider's view with plenty of 'tude in this illustrated collection.

A publisher in New York asked me to write down what I know about the Greek gods, and I was like, Can we do this anonymously? Because I don't need the Olympians mad at me again. But if it helps you to know your Greek gods, and survive an encounter with them if they ever show up in your face, then I guess writing all this down will be my good deed for the week.

So begins Percy Jackson's Greek Gods, in which the son of Poseidon adds his own magic--and sarcastic asides--to the classics. He explains how the world was created, then gives readers his personal take on a who's who of ancients, from Apollo to Zeus. Percy does not hold back. "If you like horror shows, blood baths, lying, stealing, backstabbing, and cannibalism, then read on, because it definitely was a Golden Age for all that."

Dramatic full-color illustrations throughout by Caldecott Honoree John Rocco make this volume--a must for home, library, and classroom shelves--as stunning as it is entertaining. 


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Published on October 17, 2013 09:52 • 3,268 views

October 3, 2013


Recently on Twitter I mentioned a deleted scene from The Last Olympian, in which Percy Jackson comes across his old nemesis Nancy Bobofit, the mortal girl who bullied him in The Lightning Thief. The scene was cut from the book for the sake of keeping the narrative moving, but I've always liked it. This week I spoke with Publisher's Weekly about how I decide which characters to highlight and sideline in each book. As an extension of that interview, the deleted Nancy Bobofit scene is featured below.


Percy, Thalia, Annabeth and Grover are heading to Central Park to fight the Titans when they run across a group of unconscious mortals. As you may recall, the god Morpheus put all the mortals in Manhattan to sleep before Kronos' army attacked the city:

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I guess they were on automatic timers. The streetlamps in the park glowed, making the lanes and the trees look spooky – like we needed any more spookiness. </div><div class="MsoNormalCxSpMiddle" style="line-height: 200%;"><span style="mso-tab-count: 1;">            </span>Thalia stopped and tensed, like she was catching a scent. “I’ll be back. Need to check the Hunters on the right flank.”</div><div class="MsoNormalCxSpMiddle" style="line-height: 200%;"><span style="mso-tab-count: 1;">            </span>Her bow appeared in her hands and she disappeared into the trees.</div><div class="MsoNormalCxSpMiddle" style="line-height: 200%;"><span style="mso-tab-count: 1;">            </span>We stepped over bodies of sleeping New Yorkers, moving them to safety when we could. We were just coming to a stone bridge on the northern side of the park when we came across a dozen kids, all slumped next to a pretzel stand, like they’d been lined up to buy snacks. </div><div class="MsoNormalCxSpMiddle" style="line-height: 200%;"><span style="mso-tab-count: 1;">            </span>Grover yelped. “Percy . . . look.”</div><div class="MsoNormalCxSpMiddle" style="line-height: 200%;"><span style="mso-tab-count: 1;">            </span>He crouched next to a girl with orange hair and freckles. She reminded me a little of Clarisse, because she was a big girl, like she was built for tackle football. </div><div class="MsoNormalCxSpMiddle" style="line-height: 200%;"><span style="mso-tab-count: 1;">            </span>And then my eyes widened. “Oh my gods. It’s . . . Nancy?”</div><div class="MsoNormalCxSpMiddle" style="line-height: 200%;"><span style="mso-tab-count: 1;">            </span>I hadn’t seen her in four years, but I still recognized her. Nancy Bobofit, a bully who’d made my life miserable in sixth grade. Grover and I had been at Yancy Academy, and she would pick on us mercilessly. She’d been around the first day I suspected that I was a demigod.</div><div class="MsoNormalCxSpMiddle" style="line-height: 200%;"><span style="mso-tab-count: 1;">            </span>“Who’s Nancy?” Annabeth asked.</div><div class="MsoNormalCxSpMiddle" style="line-height: 200%;"><span style="mso-tab-count: 1;">            </span>“A girl we used to know,” Grover muttered. “Not a very nice girl.”</div><div class="MsoNormalCxSpMiddle" style="line-height: 200%;"><span style="mso-tab-count: 1;">            </span>I looked at the other sleeping kids. Some I’d never seen, but a few looked familiar. </div><div class="MsoNormalCxSpMiddle" style="line-height: 200%;"><span style="mso-tab-count: 1;">            </span>“This is our class from Yancy,” I said. “They must’ve been on the summer trip.”</div><div class="MsoNormalCxSpMiddle" style="line-height: 200%;"><span style="mso-tab-count: 1;">            </span>“Yeah,” Grover said. He pointed to a lady in a flowery dress. “Here’s Mrs. Watt. She always chaperoned the summer New York trip. If we’d stayed at Yancy . . .”</div><div class="MsoNormalCxSpMiddle" style="line-height: 200%;"><span style="mso-tab-count: 1;">            </span>He didn’t finish the thought. We both knew that was impossible. We didn’t live normal lives. We never would’ve made it through middle school without monsters destroying us or the school or both. Still, it was strange looking at my former classmates. I never went backward. Once I left a school, I always tried to leave it behind for good. Besides, the memories were usually bad. But looking at the kids who’d kept going, even stupid old Nancy Bobofit, I felt a wave of sadness wash over me. </div><div class="MsoNormalCxSpMiddle" style="line-height: 200%;"><span style="mso-tab-count: 1;">            </span>“They’re right in the path of the battle,” Grover said, and he looked at me to see what I’d suggest.</div><div class="MsoNormalCxSpMiddle" style="line-height: 200%;"><span style="mso-tab-count: 1;">            </span>“We have to move them,” I said. “Under the bridge, maybe. They’ll be safer.”</div><div class="MsoNormalCxSpMiddle" style="line-height: 200%;"><span style="mso-tab-count: 1;">            </span>“After all she did to us,” Grover mused, “it kind of serves her right to be stomped by a titan army.”</div><div class="MsoNormalCxSpMiddle" style="line-height: 200%;"><span style="mso-tab-count: 1;">            </span>“But we can’t.”</div><div class="MsoNormalCxSpMiddle" style="line-height: 200%;"><span style="mso-tab-count: 1;">            </span>He sighed. “Yeah. You’re right. Maybe . . . draw a moustache on her, at least?”</div><div class="MsoNormalCxSpMiddle" style="line-height: 200%;"><span style="mso-tab-count: 1;">            </span>Four years ago, it would’ve been tempting. Now, I realized that I didn’t hate Nancy anymore. I was a different person. She was a mortal in the path of danger – we were the only thing between her and destruction.</div><div class="MsoNormalCxSpMiddle" style="line-height: 200%;"><span style="mso-tab-count: 1;">            </span>“No moustaches,” I said. “Annabeth, give me a hand?”</div><div class="MsoNormalCxSpMiddle" style="line-height: 200%;"><span style="mso-tab-count: 1;">            </span>She was studying me carefully, trying to read my thoughts, but she didn’t say anything. She just helped me drag the school group to safety.</div><div class="MsoNormal"><br /></div><div class="MsoNormal">..... </div>
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Published on October 03, 2013 14:00 • 3,346 views

October 1, 2013

It's almost time for The House of Hades, and I'm excited! Depending on where you buy your House of Hades copy, you may find a surprise inside. Each year, Disney works with some of their big accounts to produce exclusive art items for each seller. For instance . . .

If you buy a copy at Sam's Club or Walmart:

You will get the Camp Half-Blood and Camp Jupiter bumper stickers pictured below. Choose your favorite camp or decorate your car bumper with both!


If you buy a copy at Target:

You will get the door hanger pictured below, which you can hang on your bedroom door to let people know whether they can come in or not. One side says "Welcome to Mount Olympus." The other side says, "Do Not Enter or All Hades Will Break Loose!"


If you buy a copy at Barnes & Noble:

You will get a full-color map of Tartarus, available nowhere else. I can't show you the whole thing, because it contains spoilers about The House of Hades, but below is what the top portion of the map looks like:


Wherever you buy the book, I hope you enjoy it!
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Published on October 01, 2013 14:53 • 3,150 views

September 28, 2013



Before the flurry of tour activity begins, I thought I’d write a quick update on the blog.
House of Hades
First and most importantly, the wait is almost over! The House of Hades will be released in the UK, US, and Canada on Tuesday, October 8! I have confirmation it will also be released in Brazil this day. I believethe English language edition will also be available that day (or soon after) in most countries that usually get English editions, meaning Australia, New Zealand, South Africa, India, and the Philippines, but I have no direct confirmation about that. As always, you should check with booksellers in your area to ask them when the book will be available. As for other international markets, I don’t usually get information about their release dates. Remember, it takes almost as long to translate a book as it does to write it in the first place. That’s why the international editions are often a year or more behind. You will need to ask a local bookseller when the book will be available in your area.
Spoilers: Everyone hates them! I hate them. The fans hate them. So please, if you happen to get an early copy of The House of Hades, don’t spoil the story for everyone else. Accidents happen with the release date. When you’re dealing with millions of copies of a book, some of them will inevitably get out before they are supposed to. If that happens to you, well, you’re lucky, but ssshhhhhh! We don’t want to know about it. We certainly don’t want you telling everyone the plot of the book.
Another point about this: Readers, don’t believe every rumor you hear on the Internet. In fact, it’s pretty safe not to believe any of them. I know you guys like to call me a troll, but the real trolls are the people online who spread false reports trying to get you worked up about the book. From some of the supposed “spoilers” and fake book excerpts I’ve seen online, you would think that every character in The House of Hades gets killed several times. These aren’t spoilers. They are troll droppings! So if somebody claims they know what happens in the book, my advice is: 1) don’t listen 2) don’t believe 3) wait and read the book for yourself.
When the book does come out on Oct. 8, I hope you guys enjoy it. There will be some eye-popping surprises. I promise you that. But after you’ve read the book, I think those surprises will make total sense to you.
The Tour Itself
I’ll be visiting eight cities in the US this time. All the events are sold out except for the Southern Festival of Books in Nashville. The only reason that one isn’t sold out is because they aren’t selling tickets in advance. You just have to show up and hope you get a seat. If you’re planning on seeing me in Nashville, my advice is GET THERE EARLY.  Based on the response, I can pretty much guarantee there will not be enough seats for everyone who shows up, and I would hate for you to drive a long distance and get turned away. (Of course, there will be a ton of other great stuff to do at the festival and lots of other amazing authors.)
If you are coming to an event, make sure you read my blog post so you know what to expect: http://rickriordan.blogspot.com/2013/08/what-to-expect-and-not-expect-on-house.html.  Due to the size of the crowd, there won’t be a signing line, so leave your books at home. There will still be signed copies of The House of Hadesavailable, but I won’t be able to personalize your books and meet each of you individually. As much as I’d like to, when you’ve got an intimate crowd of one thousand or more, it just can’t be done in the time that we have.
As usual, my apologies if I’m not visiting your city. We try to visit different places every tour, but there’s only one of me, so obviously we can’t get everywhere. Most of the time, I have to stay home to continue writing. That’s the only way I can keep turning out a book a year! International tours, for the foreseeable future, aren’t possible either. I can’t tour and write at the same time. Like Percy, I’m pretty ADHD and I just can’t concentrate on both things at once. So for now, the writing has to take precedence.
Having said that, I look forward to seeing you if you are coming to an event, but even if you’re not, the best way to “meet” me is to read the books. Each novel is a private conversation between the reader and me, so I’ll look forward to chatting with each of you individually very soon.
What’s Next?
I’ve finished work on Percy Jackson’s Greek Gods, which is a collection of the original Greek myths told in Percy Jackson’s point of view. Our favorite Seaweed Brain will tell you everything you’ve ever wanted to know about the major gods – the good stuff, the bad stuff, and especially the embarrassing stuff – all in his trademark snarky sarcastic way (which of course bears no resemblance to the way this author thinks.) Percy Jackson’s Greek Gods will be released August 2014. I’ll post more details as soon as I can. On the tour, I’ll give you a sneak peek. If you can’t make the tour, I’m sure the sneak peek will find its way onto the Internet.
The Heroes of Olympusseries will have one more book, capping off the five-book story arc. The title of the fifth book will be revealed at the end of The House of Hades, the same way I’ve revealed all the other titles. Book five is next on my writing schedule, which is why I have to make the tour short so I can get back home and get to work! The book will be released October 2014 – one year after The House of Hades, again, just like all the other books have been.
After book five of Heroesis complete, I will at long last launch into my Norse mythology series. The first volume in that series is scheduled for 2015. It’s way too early to tell you anything else yet, but I’ve got the series mapped out and I can’t wait to get started on it.
As far as other projects I might write, believe me, I’ve got more ideas than I’ll ever be able to write in a lifetime. The problem is finding time to write them all. I can’t really speculate what will be next after the Norse series, but I will keep you posted as things develop.
What’s Going on Personally?
The Riordan family relocated to Boston this summer, as some of you read on the blog. Our new place, which we dubbed Athena House, already feels like home and we’re enjoying our new city very much. Speedy the dog loves walking through the park (or pullingus through the park, more like.) Our sons Patrick and Haley are liking their new schools. And I’m finding it a great place to write!
Tomorrow, Sunday, I’ll be participating in the Literary Lights event for the Boston Public Library. I believe the event is sold out, but if you’ve got tickets, I’ll look forward to meeting you!
And now, back to writing, but I’ll keep you posted from the road once the tour begins.
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Published on September 28, 2013 07:23 • 952 views

September 18, 2013


Thanks to the amazing Topher Bradfield at BookPeople in Austin for sharing some photos of their Camp Half-Blood summer 2013! I've run out of superlatives to describe BookPeople, Topher and the rest of his fantastic and dedicated colleagues. They have been bringing Camp Half-Blood alive for so many summers now, and have been supporters of Percy Jackson since day one. This summer, their theme was Kane Chronicles meets Camp Half-Blood/Camp Jupiter, and as you can see, they did some amazing stuff!

Above, a champion from Camp Jupiter shows off his archery skills.


The demigods work to chain an invading mummy. Yikes!

Holy Hera! Mummies are invading the camp! I think I would run if I saw that coming my direction.

The Egyptian fire mage Teth Amon. He looks like a friendly fellow . . .

The monster named 13.  I don't think they call him that because he brings good luck.

Water cannons used to extinguish the enemy! Hurray!


Do those photos make you want to visit camp? Pretty awesome! You can tell why admission to camp sells out in, like, five seconds every year. If you're in the Austin area, definitely stop by BookPeople and say hello to my favorite demigods. The store is incredible! Thanks to everybody who participated in the camp -- what an experience!









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Published on September 18, 2013 04:03 • 1,847 views

August 27, 2013

My mom sent this cool newspaper clipping yesterday, on what would've been my grandmother's 100th birthday. That's my grandmother Lillian standing on the right. Her sister, my great aunt Lula, is on the left. And that little baby is my mom!

I decided to post this because my grandmother was a huge influence on me, much like Frank Zhang's grandmother in Son of Neptune, except my grandmother was a lot nicer. She would sing me songs like "Wild Blue Yonder" or "John Billy" as she swung me under the apple tree in her backyard. She made awesome Jell-O and ambrosia -- a fruit salad with coconut shavings -- and yes, that's the first time I ever heard the term 'ambrosia.' When I was a kid reading Greek myths, I always pictured the gods sitting around eating my grandmother's fruit salad.

Most of all, I remember my grandmother's irrepressible optimism. Every time we got together, she announced, "This is the happiest day of my life!" And I think she meant it. I never heard her raise her voice. She only got mad at me once -- I don't remember what I was doing exactly, but I could be a cranky little so-and-so when I was a kid. She just frowned and told me I could go home rather than spending the night, and I was stunned. Grandmother's patience had a limit? No way!

Most of the time, she was about as close to an angel as you can get. I doubt her life was as perpetually sunny as she let on. I'm sure she had her fears and doubts like everyone, but she was determined never to let those show to her children and grandchildren. She always looked on the bright side and praised us for the good we did while downplaying the bad. As my Uncle Rees liked to joke, "If I ever got arrested, she would've assured me I was the best prisoner in the whole jail."

Whenever I need to create a strong, supportive, positive adult figure in my stories, I think about my grandmother. You can see traces of her in Sally Jackson, Tawaret and Ruby Kane.

I often regret that my grandmother didn't live to see me get published. Still, I know exactly what she'd say: "You're the best author in the whole world!" We all need someone like my grandmother in our lives, cheering us on and convincing us that we can succeed. I doubt I would've taken the risks I did if my grandmother's voice hadn't been in my head, telling me that anything was possible. So thanks, Grandmother, and happy 100th! I hope you're up there enjoying divine ambrosia under the boughs of an apple tree and eternally sunny skies.
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Published on August 27, 2013 04:35 • 1,436 views

August 15, 2013

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It is always so much fun to talk with my readers.<br /><br />Now if you're planning to come to an event, here's what you can expect and what not to expect, as I don't want anybody going away disappointed. We've been doing events differently the last few years as the crowds have gotten larger and larger. Again, check with each location for exact details, but in general, here's what happens:<br /><br />When I arrive on location, before the event, I will be signing a thousand books. These autographed copies will be available for you to buy. In some cases, they are your ticket into the event. In some cases, you can choose to get a ticket without a book, or both.<br /><br />The event will be about an hour long. I'll tell you all about how and why I wrote the books. I'll show you behind-the-scenes cover art that was never used. I'll make stupid jokes. I'll read a sneak peek from the upcoming book <b style="mso-bidi-font-weight: normal;">Percy Jackson’s Greek Gods</b> and give you some hints about what’s in store next for our demigod friends. I'll give you a little info about my upcoming Norse series. And of course I'll answer your questions, as many as we have time for. It's always a blast!<br /><br />We WON'T be doing a signing line. There are a lot of reasons for that, but it all boils down to the size of the crowd. About three years ago, I realized that so many people were coming through the signing line that nobody was really getting a chance to meet me. We had to move so fast, just to make sure everyone got through the line, that it just wasn't a quality experience for anybody, including me.  I would either have to do a brief "Hi, how are ya?" speech and then launch straight into signing, or the store would sit me right down to sign. Kids would wait for two or three hours to get a two-second face-to-face with no chance to really interact. I couldn't sign all your books. I couldn't do pictures. I couldn't personalize the books. There was maybe time for one quick question, maybe. Well . . . it just wasn't working. Back in the old days, I was able to do all of that stuff, and of course everyone understandably wants a picture and wants all of their books signed, but even if I only spent thirty seconds with each fan (which is way too short to do all that) if a thousand fans show up, the signing would last eight hours. You see the problem? Also, to be honest, I'm getting older, and sitting in a chair for so many hours each night was murdering my back.<br /><br />Because of all this, I decided if we didn't have time to do a quality signing line (and with a thousand folks, there really is no way) we would make it a quality evening, with tons of time for the presentation and lots of Q&A. Don't bring all your books from home, because I won't be able to sign them, but I wouldn't be able to do that even if we were doing a signing line. The good news: You'll still get a signed copy of <b>The House of Hades</b>. You'll get a chance to ask your questions and really feel like you got to know me a little. And you won't have to wait in line for hours and hours!<br /><br />Hope that makes sense. I'm really excited for each of the events. Of course, every tour I wish we could go to more places, but with my writing schedule we just can't. I know you guys want the books to come out as quickly as possible, and that means I have to spend most of my time writing. Apologies to all my international fans, too. I've been invited to so many amazing countries, and I'd like to visit them all, but sadly it just isn't possible. We can't even cover a fraction of the US in the time that we have! As I always tell people, however, the main way that I communicate with you is through my books. I may not be able to meet you in person, but the best way to get to know me is to read the books. Each one is a private conversation between me and the reader, and I love you guys! You're all awesome. So if I get to see you on the tour, fantastic, but either way, I hope you'll enjoy <b>The House of Hades!</b><br /><div class="MsoNormal"><br /></div>
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Published on August 15, 2013 04:48 • 2,118 views

August 8, 2013

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mso-level-text:; mso-level-tab-stop:none; mso-level-number-position:left; text-indent:-.25in; font-family:Symbol;} @list l1:level5 {mso-level-number-format:bullet; mso-level-text:o; mso-level-tab-stop:none; mso-level-number-position:left; text-indent:-.25in; font-family:"Courier New";} @list l1:level6 {mso-level-number-format:bullet; mso-level-text:; mso-level-tab-stop:none; mso-level-number-position:left; text-indent:-.25in; font-family:Wingdings;} @list l1:level7 {mso-level-number-format:bullet; mso-level-text:; mso-level-tab-stop:none; mso-level-number-position:left; text-indent:-.25in; font-family:Symbol;} @list l1:level8 {mso-level-number-format:bullet; mso-level-text:o; mso-level-tab-stop:none; mso-level-number-position:left; text-indent:-.25in; font-family:"Courier New";} @list l1:level9 {mso-level-number-format:bullet; mso-level-text:; mso-level-tab-stop:none; mso-level-number-position:left; text-indent:-.25in; font-family:Wingdings;} @list l2 {mso-list-id:2081058199; mso-list-type:hybrid; mso-list-template-ids:-1810072108 67698689 67698691 67698693 67698689 67698691 67698693 67698689 67698691 67698693;} @list l2:level1 {mso-level-number-format:bullet; mso-level-text:; mso-level-tab-stop:none; mso-level-number-position:left; text-indent:-.25in; font-family:Symbol;} @list l2:level2 {mso-level-number-format:bullet; mso-level-text:o; mso-level-tab-stop:none; mso-level-number-position:left; text-indent:-.25in; font-family:"Courier New";} @list l2:level3 {mso-level-number-format:bullet; mso-level-text:; mso-level-tab-stop:none; mso-level-number-position:left; text-indent:-.25in; font-family:Wingdings;} @list l2:level4 {mso-level-number-format:bullet; mso-level-text:; mso-level-tab-stop:none; mso-level-number-position:left; text-indent:-.25in; font-family:Symbol;} @list l2:level5 {mso-level-number-format:bullet; mso-level-text:o; mso-level-tab-stop:none; mso-level-number-position:left; text-indent:-.25in; font-family:"Courier New";} @list l2:level6 {mso-level-number-format:bullet; mso-level-text:; mso-level-tab-stop:none; mso-level-number-position:left; text-indent:-.25in; font-family:Wingdings;} @list l2:level7 {mso-level-number-format:bullet; mso-level-text:; mso-level-tab-stop:none; mso-level-number-position:left; text-indent:-.25in; font-family:Symbol;} @list l2:level8 {mso-level-number-format:bullet; mso-level-text:o; mso-level-tab-stop:none; mso-level-number-position:left; text-indent:-.25in; font-family:"Courier New";} @list l2:level9 {mso-level-number-format:bullet; mso-level-text:; mso-level-tab-stop:none; mso-level-number-position:left; text-indent:-.25in; font-family:Wingdings;} ol {margin-bottom:0in;} ul {margin-bottom:0in;} </style> --> <div class="MsoNormal" style="margin-left: .25in;"><span style="font-family: Calibri; mso-bidi-font-family: Calibri;">Always exciting when I get to announce tour dates! As always, apologies if I'm not coming to a city near you, but we can only do eight cities each tour, and we try to spread them around so we don't go to the same places each time. The rest of the year, I have to keep writing! I will have more details as they are made available. Stay tuned for that!</span></div><br /><b><span style="font-family: Calibri; mso-bidi-font-family: Calibri;">Tuesday, October 8: </span></b><br /><div class="MsoListParagraph" style="mso-list: l0 level1 lfo1; text-indent: -.25in;"><br /></div><div class="MsoListParagraph" style="mso-list: l0 level1 lfo1; text-indent: -.25in;"><span style="font-family: Calibri; mso-bidi-font-family: Calibri;">Barnes & Noble, <b>Burlington, MA</b> -- Launch Day Event!</span></div><div class="MsoListParagraph" style="mso-list: l0 level1 lfo1; text-indent: -.25in;"><br /></div><div class="MsoNormal" style="text-indent: .5in;"><span style="font-family: Calibri; mso-bidi-font-family: Calibri;">Burlington B&N #2699</span></div><div class="MsoNormal" style="text-indent: .5in;"><span style="font-family: Calibri; mso-bidi-font-family: Calibri;">98 Middlesex Parkway</span></div><div class="MsoNormal" style="text-indent: .5in;"><span style="font-family: Calibri; mso-bidi-font-family: Calibri;">Burlington, MA 01803</span></div><div class="MsoNormal" style="text-indent: .5in;"><span style="font-family: Calibri; mso-bidi-font-family: Calibri;">781-273-3871</span></div><br /><div class="MsoNormal"><span style="font-family: Calibri; mso-bidi-font-family: Calibri;"><i> Actual event will be at a local school, exact location to be announced soon. Stay tuned for full details.</i></span></div><div class="MsoNormal"><br /></div><br /><span style="font-family: Calibri; mso-bidi-font-family: Calibri;"><b>Wednesday, October 9:</b> </span><br /><br /><span style="font-family: Calibri; mso-bidi-font-family: Calibri;">Symphony Space, <b>New York, NY</b></span> <br /><div class="MsoNormal" style="margin-left: .5in;"><span style="font-family: Calibri; mso-bidi-font-family: Calibri;">2537 Broadway at 95<sup>th</sup> Street</span></div><div class="MsoNormal" style="margin-left: .5in;"><span style="font-family: Calibri; mso-bidi-font-family: Calibri;">New York, NY 10025</span></div><div class="MsoNormal" style="margin-left: .5in;"><a href="http://www.symphonyspace.org/"&g... style="font-family: Calibri; mso-bidi-font-family: Calibri;">http://www.symphonyspace.org</span... style="font-family: Calibri; mso-bidi-font-family: Calibri;"></span></div><div class="MsoNormal"><br /></div><div class="MsoNormal"><span style="font-family: Calibri; mso-bidi-font-family: Calibri;"> <i>Stay tuned for full details, including times.</i></span></div><div class="MsoNormal"><span style="font-family: Calibri; mso-bidi-font-family: Calibri;"><i><br /></i></span></div><br /><b><span style="font-family: Calibri; mso-bidi-font-family: Calibri;">Thursday, October 10</span></b><br /><br /><span style="font-family: Calibri; mso-bidi-font-family: Calibri;">Barnes&Noble <b> Fairless Hills, PA </b></span> <br /><div class="MsoListParagraphCxSpMiddle"><br /></div><div class="MsoListParagraphCxSpMiddle"><span style="font-family: Calibri; mso-bidi-font-family: Calibri;">The Court @ Oxford Valley</span></div><div class="MsoListParagraphCxSpMiddle"><span style="font-family: Calibri; mso-bidi-font-family: Calibri;">210 Commerce Blvd.</span></div><div class="MsoListParagraphCxSpMiddle"><span style="font-family: Calibri; mso-bidi-font-family: Calibri;">Fairless Hills, PA 19030</span></div><div class="MsoListParagraphCxSpMiddle"><span style="font-family: Calibri; mso-bidi-font-family: Calibri;">215-269-0442</span></div><div class="MsoListParagraphCxSpMiddle"><br /></div><br /><span style="font-family: Calibri; mso-bidi-font-family: Calibri;"><i> Actual event will be at a local school, exact location to be announced soon. Stay tuned for full details!</i></span><br /><div class="MsoNormal"><br /></div><div class="MsoNormal"><br /></div><b><span style="font-family: Calibri; mso-bidi-font-family: Calibri;">Friday, October 11</span></b><br /><br /><span style="font-family: Calibri; mso-bidi-font-family: Calibri;">Politics & Prose Bookstore, <b>Washington, DC </b>with Wilson High School, 7:00 PM</span> <br /><div class="MsoNormal"><br /></div><div class="MsoNormal" style="margin-left: .5in;"><u><span style="font-family: Calibri; mso-bidi-font-family: Calibri;">Host:</span></u></div><div class="MsoNormal" style="margin-left: .5in;"><span style="font-family: Calibri; mso-bidi-font-family: Calibri;">Politics and Prose</span></div><div class="MsoNormal" style="margin-left: .5in;"><span style="font-family: Calibri; mso-bidi-font-family: Calibri;">5015 Connecticut Avenue NW</span></div><div class="MsoNormal" style="margin-left: .5in;"><span style="font-family: Calibri; mso-bidi-font-family: Calibri;">Washington, DC 2008</span></div><div class="MsoNormal" style="margin-left: .5in;"><span style="font-family: Calibri; mso-bidi-font-family: Calibri;">202-364-1919</span></div><div class="MsoNormal" style="margin-left: .5in;"><a href="http://www.politics-prose.com/"&... style="font-family: Calibri; mso-bidi-font-family: Calibri;">http://www.politics-prose.com</spa... style="font-family: Calibri; mso-bidi-font-family: Calibri;"></span></div><div class="MsoNormal"><br /></div><div class="MsoNormal"><a href="http://www.wilsonhs.org/">&lt... style="font-family: Calibri; mso-bidi-font-family: Calibri;"><br /></span></a></div><div class="MsoNormal"><br /></div><div class="MsoNormal"><br /></div><span style="font-family: Calibri; mso-bidi-font-family: Calibri;"><b>Saturday, October 12, 7PM</b></span><br /><br /><span style="font-family: Calibri; mso-bidi-font-family: Calibri;">St. Louis Public Library, <b>St. Louis, MO </b></span> <br /><div class="MsoListParagraphCxSpMiddle"><br /></div><div class="MsoListParagraphCxSpMiddle"><u><span style="font-family: Calibri; mso-bidi-font-family: Calibri;">Host and event location:</span></u></div><div class="MsoListParagraphCxSpMiddle"><span style="font-family: Calibri; mso-bidi-font-family: Calibri;">St. Louis County Library</span></div><div class="MsoListParagraphCxSpMiddle"><span style="font-family: Calibri; mso-bidi-font-family: Calibri;">1640 S. Lindbergh Blvd.</span></div><div class="MsoListParagraphCxSpMiddle"><span style="font-family: Calibri; mso-bidi-font-family: Calibri;">St. Louis, MO 63131</span></div><div class="MsoListParagraphCxSpMiddle"><span style="font-family: Calibri; mso-bidi-font-family: Calibri;">314-994-3300</span></div><div class="MsoListParagraphCxSpLast"><a href="http://www.slcl.org/"><span style="font-family: Calibri; mso-bidi-font-family: Calibri;">http://www.slcl.org</span></... style="font-family: Calibri; mso-bidi-font-family: Calibri;"></span></div><div class="MsoNormal"><br /></div><div class="MsoNormal"><br /></div><b><span style="font-family: Calibri; mso-bidi-font-family: Calibri;">Sunday, October 13: </span></b><br /><br /><span style="font-family: Calibri; mso-bidi-font-family: Calibri;">Southern Festival of Books, <b>Nashville, TN</b></span><br /><span style="font-family: Calibri; mso-bidi-font-family: Calibri;"> <i style="mso-bidi-font-style: normal;">time to be confirmed</i></span> <br /><a href="http://www.humanitiestennessee.org/pr... style="font-family: Calibri; mso-bidi-font-family: Calibri;"></span></a><br /><div class="MsoNormal" style="margin-left: .5in;"><span style="font-family: Calibri; mso-bidi-font-family: Calibri;"> </span><a href="http://www.wmarocks.com/">&lt... style="font-family: Calibri; mso-bidi-font-family: Calibri;"></span></a><span style="font-family: Calibri; mso-bidi-font-family: Calibri;"></span><span style="font-family: Calibri; mso-bidi-font-family: Calibri;"> </span></div><div class="MsoNormal" style="margin-left: .5in;"><u><span style="font-family: Calibri; mso-bidi-font-family: Calibri;">Books provided by:</span></u></div><div class="MsoNormal" style="margin-left: .5in;"><span style="font-family: Calibri; mso-bidi-font-family: Calibri;">Parnassus Books</span></div><div class="MsoNormal" style="margin-left: .5in;"><span style="font-family: Calibri; mso-bidi-font-family: Calibri;">3900 Hillsboro Pike</span></div><div class="MsoNormal" style="margin-left: .5in;"><span style="font-family: Calibri; mso-bidi-font-family: Calibri;">Nashville, TN 37215</span></div><div class="MsoNormal" style="margin-left: .5in;"><span style="font-family: Calibri; mso-bidi-font-family: Calibri;">615-953-2243</span></div><div class="MsoNormal" style="margin-left: .5in;"><a href="http://www.parnassusbooks.net/"&... style="font-family: Calibri; mso-bidi-font-family: Calibri;">http://www.parnassusbooks.net</spa... style="font-family: Calibri; mso-bidi-font-family: Calibri;"></span></div><div class="MsoNormal" style="margin-left: .5in;"><br /></div><div class="MsoNormal" style="margin-left: .5in;"><br /></div><span style="font-family: Calibri; mso-bidi-font-family: Calibri;"><b>Monday, October 14, 5PM</b></span><br /><br /><span style="font-family: Calibri; mso-bidi-font-family: Calibri;">Blue Willow Bookshop, <b>Houston, TX</b>, at Morton Ranch High School</span> <br /><div class="MsoListParagraphCxSpMiddle"><br /></div><div class="MsoListParagraphCxSpMiddle"><u><span style="font-family: Calibri; mso-bidi-font-family: Calibri;">Host:</span></u></div><div class="MsoListParagraphCxSpMiddle"><span style="font-family: Calibri; mso-bidi-font-family: Calibri;">Blue Willow Bookshop</span></div><div class="MsoListParagraphCxSpMiddle"><span style="font-family: Calibri; mso-bidi-font-family: Calibri;">14532 Memorial Drive</span></div><div class="MsoListParagraphCxSpMiddle"><span style="font-family: Calibri; mso-bidi-font-family: Calibri;">Houston, TX 77079</span></div><div class="MsoListParagraphCxSpLast"><span style="font-family: Calibri; mso-bidi-font-family: Calibri;">281-497-8675</span></div><div class="MsoNormal" style="margin-left: .5in;"><a href="http://www.bluewillowbookshop.com/&qu... style="font-family: Calibri; mso-bidi-font-family: Calibri;">http://www.bluewillowbookshop.com<... style="font-family: Calibri; mso-bidi-font-family: Calibri;"></span></div><div class="MsoListParagraphCxSpFirst"><br /></div><div class="MsoNormal"><br /></div><span style="font-family: Calibri; mso-bidi-font-family: Calibri;"><b>Tuesday, October 15, 7PM</b> -- this event is SOLD OUT!</span><br /><br /><span style="font-family: Calibri; mso-bidi-font-family: Calibri;">Minnesota Public Radio’s Fitzgerald Theater, <b> St. Paul, MN </b></span><br /><a href="http://fitzgeraldtheater.publicradio.... style="font-family: Calibri; mso-bidi-font-family: Calibri;"></span></a><br /><div class="MsoNormal" style="margin-left: .5in;"><br /></div><div class="MsoNormal" style="margin-left: .5in;"><u><span style="font-family: Calibri; mso-bidi-font-family: Calibri;">Books provided by:</span></u></div><div class="MsoListParagraphCxSpFirst"><span style="font-family: Calibri; mso-bidi-font-family: Calibri;">Micawber’s Books</span></div><div class="MsoListParagraphCxSpMiddle"><span style="font-family: Calibri; mso-bidi-font-family: Calibri;">2238 Carter Avenue</span></div><div class="MsoListParagraphCxSpMiddle"><span style="font-family: Calibri; mso-bidi-font-family: Calibri;">St. Paul, MN 55108</span></div><div class="MsoListParagraphCxSpMiddle"><span style="font-family: Calibri; mso-bidi-font-family: Calibri;">651-646-5506</span></div><div class="MsoListParagraphCxSpLast"><a href="http://www.micawbers.com/">&l... style="font-family: Calibri; mso-bidi-font-family: Calibri;">http://www.micawbers.com</span>... style="font-family: Calibri; mso-bidi-font-family: Calibri;"></span></div><div class="MsoNormal"><br /></div>
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Published on August 08, 2013 15:14 • 2,708 views