Deborah Eisenberg





Deborah Eisenberg

Author profile


born
in Chicago, The United States
November 20, 1945

gender
female

genre


About this author

Born in Chicago, Eisenberg moved to New York City in the 1960's where she has lived ever since. She also teaches at the University of Virginia. Her writing has appeared in The New Yorker, The Yale Review, Vanity Fair, and Tin House. She has won the Rea Award for the Short Story, a Whiting Writer's Award, a Guggenheim Fellowship, and three O. Henry Awards.


Average rating: 3.87 · 3,734 ratings · 497 reviews · 23 distinct works · Similar authors
Twilight of the Superheroes
3.58 of 5 stars 3.58 avg rating — 862 ratings — published 2006 — 8 editions
Rate this book
Clear rating
The Collected Stories
4.13 of 5 stars 4.13 avg rating — 321 ratings — published 2008 — 5 editions
Rate this book
Clear rating
The Stories
4.03 of 5 stars 4.03 avg rating — 133 ratings — published 1997
Rate this book
Clear rating
All Around Atlantis
3.91 of 5 stars 3.91 avg rating — 125 ratings — published 1997 — 6 editions
Rate this book
Clear rating
Transactions in a Foreign C...
3.85 of 5 stars 3.85 avg rating — 108 ratings — published 1986 — 6 editions
Rate this book
Clear rating
Under the 82nd Airborne
3.8 of 5 stars 3.80 avg rating — 55 ratings — published 1992 — 6 editions
Rate this book
Clear rating
Some Other, Better Otto
4.8 of 5 stars 4.80 avg rating — 5 ratings
Rate this book
Clear rating
Pastorale
4.0 of 5 stars 4.00 avg rating — 2 ratings — published 1983
Rate this book
Clear rating
Petits Désordres Sans Impor...
3.0 of 5 stars 3.00 avg rating — 1 rating — published 1993 — 2 editions
Rate this book
Clear rating
Your Duck is My Duck
by
0.0 of 5 stars 0.00 avg rating — 0 ratings — published 2013
Rate this book
Clear rating
More books by Deborah Eisenberg…

Upcoming Events

No scheduled events. Add an event.

“Stop that Stuart," Patty said as Stuart struggled with the suitcases, which were too heavy for him, she thought. (Almost everything was way too heavy for Stuart.)" Just put those down. Besides," Patty said, "where will you go? You don't have anyplace to go." But Stuart took her hand and held it for a moment against his closed eyes, and despite the many occasions when Patty had wanted him to go, and the several occasions when she had tried to make him go, despite the fact that he was at his most enragingly pathetic, for once she could think of nothing, nothing at all that he could be trying to shame her into or shame her out of, and so it occurred to her that this he would really leave---that he was simply saying good-bye. All along, Patty had been unaware that time is as adhesive as love, and that the more time you spend with someone the greater the likelihood of finding yourself with a permanent sort of thing to deal with that people casually refer to as "friendship," as if that were the end of the matter,when the truth is that even if "your friend" does something annoying, or if you and "your friend" decided that you hate each other, or if "your friend" moves away and you lose each other's address, you still have a friendship, and although it can change shape, look different in different lights, become an embarrassment or an encumbrance or a sorrow, it can't simply cease to have existed, no matter how far into the past it sinks, so attempts to disavow or destroy it will not merely constitute betrayals of friendship but, more practically, are bound to be fruitless, causing damage only to the humans involved rather than to that gummy jungle(friendship)in which those humans have entrapped themselves, so if sometime in the future you're not going to want to have been a particular person's friend, or if you're not going to want to have had that particular friendship you and that person can make with one another, then don't be friends with that person at all, don't talk to that person, don't go anywhere near that person, because as soon as you start to see something from that person's point of view (which, inevitably, will be as soon as you stand next to that person) common ground is sure to slide under your feet.”
Deborah Eisenberg, The Stories

“It's broadening. You meet people in your family you'd never happen to run into otherwise.”
Deborah Eisenberg, Twilight of the Superheroes

“When one contemplated Portia, when one contemplated Sharon, when one contemplated one's own apparently pointless, utterly trivial being, the questions hung all around one, as urgent as knives at the throat. But the instant one tried to grasp one of them and turn it to one's own purpose and pierce through the murk, it became blunt and useless as a piece of cardboard.”
Deborah Eisenberg

Topics Mentioning This Author



Is this you? Let us know. If not, help out and invite Deborah to Goodreads.