Neil Johnson





Neil Johnson



Average rating: 3.65 · 369 ratings · 61 reviews · 33 distinct works · Similar authors
Simply Complexity: A Clear ...

3.54 avg rating — 233 ratings — published 2007 — 4 editions
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The Falling Raindrop

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3.96 avg rating — 102 ratings — published 2010 — 2 editions
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National Geographic Photogr...

3.57 avg rating — 7 ratings — published 2001 — 2 editions
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The Battle Of Lexington And...

really liked it 4.00 avg rating — 4 ratings — published 1992
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A Field of Sunflowers

really liked it 4.00 avg rating — 3 ratings — published 1997 — 2 editions
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Big Top Circus

liked it 3.00 avg rating — 3 ratings — published 1995 — 2 editions
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The Battle of Gettysburg: W...

4.50 avg rating — 2 ratings — published 1989
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Shreveport and Bossier City...

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really liked it 4.00 avg rating — 1 rating — published 1995
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Fire and Silk: Flying in a ...

really liked it 4.00 avg rating — 1 rating — published 1991
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Batter Up!

2.50 avg rating — 2 ratings — published 1990 — 3 editions
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“We are certainly able to create temporary pockets of order in certain places and at certain times, if we feed in the right amounts of energy and effort from the outside. However it turns out that this local increase in order comes at the expense of a decrease in the amount of order in your body and in your immediate environment. As you reorder the files or make the ruler stand upright, for example, you are using energy – and some of this energy is lost as heat since you are effectively doing some exercise. And adding heat to your environment means that you are increasing the disorder in the air molecules around your body. In fact it is even worse than this – the disorder which you create as a by-product of your reordering of files or balancing of rulers will always be greater than the amount of order which you manage to create. In other words, the law is correct in that the overall disorder in the Universe increases. So although we humans can invent stories, build buildings, and can even create new lives by giving birth, each of these acts will actually destroy more order in the rest of the Universe than it can possibly create in the resulting book, building or baby. Depressing? Actually it was a physicist called Ludwig Boltzmann who came up with the pioneering insights into this effect of increasing disorder – and he ended up committing suicide in 1906 by hanging himself while on vacation.”
Neil Johnson, Simply Complexity

“there is a natural tendency for something that is ordered to become disordered as time goes by. In contrast, something that is disordered is highly unlikely to order itself without any additional help.”
Neil Johnson, Simply Complexity



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