Frederick Wemyss

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Frederick Wemyss

Goodreads Author


Born
in New York City, The United States
Member Since
June 2007


You can get my book by ordering it from McNally Jackson Books in New York City. Here is the link:
http://www.mcnallyjackson.com/bookmac...

On July 28th, 2015, at 7 pm, I'll be reading from and signing copies of my memoir, THINGS THAT HAPPENED TO MY MOTHER.

The venue is Book Revue, 313 New York Ave., Huntington, NY 11743.

See me in 3-D and hear me in however many dimensions the spoken word is spoken in! It's free. If you want the book, it is thirteen dollars plus tax. If you have the book already and want me to sign it, please do spe... Read more of this blog post »
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Published on July 17, 2015 22:08 • 29 views
Average rating: 5.00 · 1 rating · 1 review · 1 distinct work · Similar authors
Things That Happened To My ...

it was amazing 5.00 avg rating — 1 rating — published 2015
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* Note: these are all the books on Goodreads for this author. To add more, click here.

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The Way Out (Select)
1 chapters   —   updated Jun 29, 2015 11:00PM
Description: This is a fragment. In other words, it's an unfinished piece. I wrote it in 1986. I've added a note at the end, written on June 28th, 2015.
The Electron Microscope (Literature & Fiction)
1 chapters   —   updated May 13, 2015 06:37PM
Description: This is a piece I'm developing. I will make changes to it. It's in flux.
Snippets (Entertainment)
1 chapters   —   updated May 13, 2015 06:31PM
Description: More stuff I've found in my wallet. Goodreads is essentially a file cabinet for me. These are doodlings of mine from the last two weeks. I'm attempting alliteration in two of these pieces. The first one is the first moment of a projected novel. I have many projected novels, so this is probably the last of this one. Hope you like 'em.
Plus (Literature & Fiction)
1 chapters   —   updated May 13, 2015 06:30PM
Description: Somewhere between prose and a poem.
The Cookie-cutter Killer (Literature & Fiction)
1 chapters   —   updated May 13, 2015 06:30PM
Description: Written in 2010.
More of Frederick’s writing…
Bleak House
Frederick is currently reading
bookshelves: currently-reading
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The Underdogs
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P. G. Wodehouse: ...
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Frederick's Recent Updates

Frederick is on page 481 of 1017 of Bleak House
Bleak House by Charles Dickens
Bleak House
by Charles Dickens
progress: 
 
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Frederick rated a book it was amazing
Moby-Dick; or, The Whale by Herman Melville
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I read MOBY-DICK in the summer of 1977, when I was seventeen. Two cheers for callow youth.
My father kept telling me I shouldn't read it until I was thirty-five.
Of course, Melville was thirty-two when he wrote it.
First things first: You should read th
...more
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Pierre by Herman Melville
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[My review is of the standard edition of PIERRE. The Kraken Edition, to which Goodreads defaults, is wonderful, but the difference between it and the standard edition is very significant, inasmuch as the Kraken Edition dispenses with chapters Melvill ...more
Moby-Dick; or, The Whale by Herman Melville
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Pierre, or the Ambiguities by Herman Melville
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I read Pierre when I was nineteen. I believe that is the age Pierre is at the start of the book.
Literary titan though Melville was for writing MOBY-DICK and BILLY BUDD, he was prone to scuttling his own ship. After PIERRE was accepted by the publishe
...more
Frederick is currently reading
The Underdogs by Mariano Azuela
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Bleak House by Charles Dickens
"Hadn't read it since my first time
In 1969 in grad school.
Monumental, humane, devastatingly satirical. Lady Dedlock is one of Dickens' most heartbreaking creations."
Frederick is on page 291 of 1017 of Bleak House
Bleak House by Charles Dickens
Bleak House
by Charles Dickens
progress: 
 
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Frederick wants to read
Groucho Marx by Lee Siegel
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Frederick started reading
Bleak House by Charles Dickens
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More of Frederick's books…
George Orwell
“He got up. It was too early to go to bed; at least, he was not in the mood for it. He pined for a bit of amusement - something cheap and easy. A seat in the pictures, cigarettes, beer. Useless! No money to pay for any of them. He would read KING LEAR and forget this filthy century. Finally, however, it was THE ADVENTURES OF SHERLOCK HOLMES that he took from the mantelpiece. SHERLOCK HOLMES was his favorite of all books, because he knew it by heart. The oil in the lamp was giving out and it was getting beastly cold. Gordon dragged the quilt from his bed, wrapped it round his legs and sat down to read. His right elbow on the table, his hands under his coat to keep them warm, he read through "The Adventure of the Speckled Band." The little gas-mantle sighed above, the circular flame of the oil-lamp burned low, a thin bracket of fire, giving out no more heat than a candle.”
George Orwell

Michel de Montaigne
“On the highest throne in the world, we still sit only on our own bottom.”
Michel de Montaigne, The Complete Essays

Leo Tolstoy
“If you look for perfection, you'll never be content.”
Leo Tolstoy, Anna Karenina

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Frederick K.D. wrote: "Thanks for inviting me sir. I love your books!

K.D."


Thank you. I see you're reading Dashiell Hammett. I just read THE GLASS KEY. Highly entertaining!


message 12: by K.D.

K.D. Absolutely Thanks for inviting me sir. I love your books!

K.D.


Frederick Ben wrote: "did you frame your letter from p.g. wodehouse? i would totally have framed that letter!

best,
ben"

Hey, Ben, i only just now saw your question about whether or not I framed my letter from P.G. Wodehouse. And it's December already! So, almost half a year later I am answering. I have never had it framed. But when I do I will also frame my Louis Armstrong autograph! I saw him at a local jazz concert when I was ten. He was a surprise guest. He sang "Hello, Dolly" and then sat in the audience and signed each page of a fan's scrapbook. My brother and I ran up to him and asked him to sign our programs. It was 1970. He died a year later. The concert was by a bandmate of his named Arvell Shaw. It was a charity event and the rumor was that Louis Armstrong would show up.


message 10: by Ben

Ben Loory did you frame your letter from p.g. wodehouse? i would totally have framed that letter!

best,
ben


Frederick Gary wrote: "How are you liking FREEDOM so far?? Email me about it?
I am hoping to see the man in person on Sept. 20th. They have moved the Venue twice in anticipation of a big crowd. The man is coming home to..."

Hey, Gary,
I'm about halfway through FREEDOM and I find it highly amusing. Franzen has delivered on his promise. I read THE TWENTY-SEVENTH CITY when it came out, back in 1990 or so and, although he says that book was satire and that he does not write satire any more, he certainly seems to me to be expanding on themes that book introduced. The further into FREEDOM I get, the more I think Franzen is trying to get down on paper, for the world to see, what it is like to live in this country. On the surface it is similar to many serious works written today, but he has hit on something regarding the national character. There is a stillness to this book which is missing in most current literature, and I detect that stillness in Twain and Melville. And in John O'Hara. Please give him a shout-out from a fan on Long Island when you see him in St. Louis!


message 8: by Gary

Gary How are you liking FREEDOM so far?? Email me about it?
I am hoping to see the man in person on Sept. 20th. They have moved the Venue twice in anticipation of a big crowd. The man is coming home to St. Louis!


message 7: by David

David Gallagher Hey, Fred,
I don't see you around here much. As for things on my side...I swear if summer doesn't come soon I'll get depressed! I'll reply to your emails asap, but I do hope you're doing well in the meantime.

By the way, since you're a member here, why did you register on ABO? This is much better, it makes no sense to me at all why you'd do that. I'm actually trying to find a way to disable my account there, but can't seem to find any - do you happen to know how to?


message 6: by David

David Gallagher Thanks for recommending "A Perfect Waiter" to me. What a cool system! Let's add that to my ever-growing list of "to-read!"


Charmless Thanks Fred. Happy New Year! :-). . . And thanks for checking out the chat room.

(Btw, Guilty Pleasures has been pretty quiet. Hopefully, it's just because of the holidays. Hehe.)


Frederick Hi, Saleh,

That's a very good question. I will answer it. (I'll also ask if you first heard it as the title of a collection of Raymond Carver stories. I have not read anything by him--although I am aware of his general contribution of realistic stories about people suffering from depression--and I may be wrong as to whether he wrote a book with that title, but, in any case, I associate the question with him.)
Because there are so many varieties of love, there are many different things which might be meant, by any one person when that person brings up the subject. Often it is part of a complaint, such as "You don't love me." Whether that complaint is directed toward a parent, a sibling or a son or daughter, a sense of abandonment is implied, as it would be when addressed to a lover. Often it is a lie: "I love you." Often it is true. Again, "I love you." We talk of God's love, our love of God, or the love shared between God and man. (That last one is almost never discussed.)



message 3: by Saleh

Saleh Hi.What We Talk About When We Talk About Love?PLZ Answer The Question In My Profile.


Frederick Yams--check! (Mashed in bowls, but easily from a yard-long sources.)
Yapping yoyo-yanking yetis -- check! (Stocking stuffers for my nephews and niece included all sorts of walking beasts and toys with strings.)
Yak-milk yeast cakes -- check! (Aged goat cheese on tobasco crackers.)
Yellow yarn-yielding year-end yard gnomes -- check! (My cousin sent a card of her house with gnomes Phot-shopped onto the lawn. My brother gave his kids a ketchup bottle which squeezes red yarn.)

You've yet to yell "Year's Yonder!" [A.k.a. Happy new Year.]

Fred


Jeremy Hi Frederick!

Here’s wishing you a yippee-filled Yuletime overflowing with yard-long yams, yapping yoyo-yanking yetis, yak-milk yeast-cakes, and yellow yarn-yielding year-end yard-gnomes.

-Jeremy :)


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