Emily Anthes




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Emily Anthes

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About this author

Emily Anthes is a science journalist and author. Her work has appeared in Wired, Scientific American Mind, Psychology Today, Seed, Discover, Slate, Good, New York, Popular Mechanics, Foreign Policy, The Boston Globe, and elsewhere.

Her book, Frankenstein’s Cat: Cuddling Up to Biotech’s Brave New Beasts, will be published in March 2013 by Scientific American/Farrar, Straus and Giroux.

Emily has a master’s degree in science writing from MIT and a bachelor’s degree in the history of science and medicine from Yale, where she also studied creative writing. She lives in Brooklyn, New York with her dog, Milo.

Follow Emily on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/EmilyAnthesA...

"Like" Frankenstein's Cat on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/pages/Franke....more


Average rating: 3.72 · 430 ratings · 104 reviews · 2 distinct works · Similar authors
Frankenstein's Cat: Cuddlin...
3.72 of 5 stars 3.72 avg rating — 404 ratings — published 2013 — 12 editions
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3.62 of 5 stars 3.62 avg rating — 26 ratings — published 2008 — 8 editions
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* Note: these are all the books on Goodreads for this author. To add more, click here.

Three years ago, Brian Mossop, then the community manager at PLoS, asked me if I’d ever considered blogging. I had, but only in the way that I had, say, contemplated having children–it was a distant, abstract notion.
But Brian told me that PLoS was getting ready to launch a new blog network and that a handful of other fantastic writers had already signed on to participate. I decided that it was... Read more of this blog post »
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Case Histories by Kate Atkinson
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California by Edan Lepucki
California
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Authority by Jeff VanderMeer
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Annihilation by Jeff VanderMeer
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Animal Madness by Laurel Braitman
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Swamplandia! by Karen Russell
Swamplandia!
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Lexicon by Max Barry
Lexicon
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Salt Sugar Fat by Michael Moss
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More of Emily's books…
“The troubled middle is…a place where it’s possible to truly love animals and still accept their occasional role as resources, objects, and tools. Those of us in the troubled middle believe that animals deserve to be treated well, but we don’t want to ban their use in medical research. We care enough to want livestock to be raised humanely, but don’t want to abandon meat-eating altogether. ‘Some argue that we are fence-sitters, moral wimps,’ Herzog, himself a resident of the troubled middle, writes. ‘I believe, however, that the troubled middle makes perfect sense because moral quagmires are inevitable in a species with a huge brain and a big heart. They come with the territory.”
Emily Anthes, Frankenstein's Cat: Cuddling Up to Biotech's Brave New Beasts

“Humans are a force of nature—we are, in some senses, THE force of nature—and we influence animals whether we intend to or not. So the real question, going forward, is not WHETHER we should shape animals’ bodies and lives, but HOW we should do so—with what tools, under what circumstances, and to what end… Unless we plan to move all humanity to Mars and leave Earth to rewild itself, we may need to help our furry and feathered friends survive in a world that has us in it. As Kraemer puts it: ‘I’m of the persuasion that we are changing the habitat of wildlife so rapidly that we may have to help those species evolve.”
Emily Anthes, Frankenstein's Cat: Cuddling Up to Biotech's Brave New Beasts

“The important thing is that we do not throw the genetically modified baby out with the bathwater. We spend so much time discussing the ethics of using our emerging scientific capabilities that we sometimes forget that NOT using them has ethical implications of its own. … Biotechnology is not the only solution to what ails animals, but it’s a weapon we now have in our arsenal, one set of strategies for boosting animal health and welfare. If we reject it out of hand, we lose the good along with the bad.”
Emily Anthes, Frankenstein's Cat: Cuddling Up to Biotech's Brave New Beasts




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