M.E. Bradford





M.E. Bradford


Born
in Forth Worth, Texas, The United States
May 08, 1934

Died
March 03, 1993


M.E. Bradford was professor of English at the University of Dallas and the author of numerous books, including Original Intentions: On the Making and Ratification of the United States Constitution and A Better Guide Than Reason: Studies in the American Revolution.

Average rating: 4.26 · 77 ratings · 17 reviews · 16 distinct works · Similar authors
Original Intentions: On the...

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4.29 avg rating — 17 ratings — published 1993
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Founding Fathers: Brief Liv...

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4.17 avg rating — 18 ratings — published 1994 — 2 editions
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A Better Guide Than Reason:...

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4.50 avg rating — 12 ratings — published 1979 — 2 editions
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The Reactionary Imperative:...

4.50 avg rating — 8 ratings — published 1999 — 2 editions
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A Worthy Company: The Drama...

really liked it 4.00 avg rating — 6 ratings — published 1982 — 2 editions
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Remembering Who We Are: Obs...

3.83 avg rating — 6 ratings — published 1985
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Against the Barbarians, and...

4.33 avg rating — 3 ratings — published 1992
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Religion & the Framers: The...

it was amazing 5.00 avg rating — 1 rating — published 1991
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The Great Convention as Com...

0.00 avg rating — 0 ratings — published 2013
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The Strange Career of C. Va...

0.00 avg rating — 0 ratings — published 2014
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More books by M.E. Bradford…
“For this equality belongs to the post-Renaissance world of ideology-of political magic and the alchemical science” of politics. Envy is the basis of its broad appeal. And rampant envy, the besetting virus of modern society, is the most predictable result of insistence upon its realization. Furthermore, hue and cry over equality of opportunity and equal rights leads, a fortiori, to a final demand for equality of condition. Under its pressure self respect gives way in the large majority of men who have not reached the level of their expectation, who have no support from an inclusive identity, and who hunger for “revenge” on those who occupy a higher station and will (they expect) continue to enjoy that advantage. The end result is visible in the spiritual proletarians of the “lonely crowd.” Bertrand de Jouvenel has described the process which produces such non-persons in his memorable study, On Power. They are the natural pawns of an impersonal and omnicompetent Leviathan. And to insure their docility such a state is certain to recruit a large “new class” of men, persons superior in “ability” and authority, both to their ostensible “masters” among the people and to such anachronisms as stand in their progressive way. Such is the evidence of the recent past and particularly of American history. Arrant individualism, fracturing and then destroying the hope of amity and confederation, the communal bond and the ancient vision of the good society as an extrapolation from family, is one villain in this tale. Another is rationalized cowardice, shame, and ingratitude hidden behind the disguise of self-sufficiency or the mask of injured merit. Interdependence, which secures dignity and makes of equality a mere irrelevance, is the principal victim.”
M.E. Bradford