Tadeusz Borowski





Tadeusz Borowski

Author profile


born
in Zhytomyr (formerly Poland), Ukraine
November 12, 1922

died
July 03, 1951

gender
male

genre


About this author

Tadeusz Borowski was a Polish writer and journalist, and an Auschwitz and Dachau survivor. His books are recognized as classics of Polish post-war literature and had much influence in Central European society.


Average rating: 4.07 · 4,263 ratings · 230 reviews · 17 distinct works · Similar authors
This Way for the Gas, Ladie...
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4.08 of 5 stars 4.08 avg rating — 3,861 ratings — published 1947 — 26 editions
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Here in Our Auschwitz and O...
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3.86 of 5 stars 3.86 avg rating — 206 ratings — published 1983 — 6 editions
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Wspomnienia Wiersze Opowiad...
4.0 of 5 stars 4.00 avg rating — 26 ratings
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Dzień na Harmenzach
3.62 of 5 stars 3.62 avg rating — 8 ratings
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Bei uns in Auschwitz
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4.5 of 5 stars 4.50 avg rating — 4 ratings — published 2008 — 2 editions
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Postal Indiscretions: The C...
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4.33 of 5 stars 4.33 avg rating — 3 ratings — published 2013 — 3 editions
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Silence
3.5 of 5 stars 3.50 avg rating — 2 ratings
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Böyle Buyurun Gaz'a Bayanla...
4.0 of 5 stars 4.00 avg rating — 1 rating — published 1992 — 2 editions
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Proza I
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Wiersze
0.0 of 5 stars 0.00 avg rating — 0 ratings2 editions
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More books by Tadeusz Borowski…
“There can be no beauty if it is paid for by human injustice, nor truth that passes over injustice in silence, nor moral virtue that condones it.”
Tadeusz Borowski, This Way for the Gas, Ladies and Gentlemen

“Despite the madness of war, we lived for a world that would be different. For a better world to come when all this is over. And perhaps even our being here is a step towards that world. Do you really think that, without the hope that such a world is possible, that the rights of man will be restored again, we could stand the concentration camp even for one day? It is that very hope that makes people go without a murmur to the gas chambers, keeps them from risking a revolt, paralyses them into numb inactivity. It is hope that breaks down family ties, makes mothers renounce their children, or wives sell their bodies for bread, or husbands kill. It is hope that compels man to hold on to one more day of life, because that day may be the day of liberation. Ah, and not even the hope for a different, better world, but simply for life, a life of peace and rest. Never before in the history of mankind has hope been stronger than man, but never also has it done so much harm as it has in the war, in this concentration camp. We were never taught how to give up hope, and this is why today we perish in gas chambers.”
Tadeusz Borowski, This Way for the Gas, Ladies and Gentlemen

“You know how much I used to like Plato. Today i realize he lied. For the things of this world are not a reflection of the ideal, but a product of human sweat, blood and hard labour. It is we who built the pyramids, hewed the marble for the temples and the rocks for the imperial roads, we who pulled the oars in the galleys and dragged wooden ploughs, while they wrote dialogues and dramas, rationalized their intrigues by appeals in the name of the Fatherland, made wars over boundaries and democracies. We were filthy and died real deaths. They were 'aesthetic' and carried on subtle debates.
There can be no beauty if it is paid for by human injustice, nor truth that passes over injustice in silence, nor moral virtue that condones it.”
Tadeusz Borowski, This Way for the Gas, Ladies and Gentlemen

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