Ann Crittenden





Ann Crittenden

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born
Dallas, TX, The United States
gender
female

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About this author

Ann Crittenden is an award-winning journalist, author, and lecturer. Her latest book, If You've Raised Kids, You Can Manage Anything, received critical praise and was featured in People magazine. Her previous book, The Price of Motherhood, garnered widespread media attention and was named one of the New York Times Notable Books of the Year in 2001. The book is already being called a classic. A women's magazine editor wrote recently, "If The Feminine Mystique was the book that laid the seeds for the women's movement of the 1960's, The Price of Motherhood may someday be regarded as the one that did the same for the mothers' movement."

Crittenden was a reporter for The New York Times for eight years, writing on a broad range of economic topics.
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Average rating: 3.97 · 579 ratings · 92 reviews · 5 distinct works · Similar authors
The Price of Motherhood: Wh...
4.0 of 5 stars 4.00 avg rating — 560 ratings — published 2001 — 3 editions
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If You've Raised Kids, You ...
3.07 of 5 stars 3.07 avg rating — 15 ratings — published 2004 — 2 editions
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Sanctuary: A Story of Ameri...
4.33 of 5 stars 4.33 avg rating — 3 ratings — published 1988
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If Youve Raised Kids You Can M
3.0 of 5 stars 3.00 avg rating — 1 rating
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Killing the Sacred Cows
0.0 of 5 stars 0.00 avg rating — 0 ratings — published 1993
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“Any woman who has devoted herself to raising children has experienced the hollow praise that only thinly conceals smug dismissal. In a culture that measures worth and achievement almost solely in terms of money, the intensive work of rearing responsible adults counts for little. One of the most intriguing questions in economic history is how this came to be; how mothers came to be excluded from the ranks of productive citizens. How did the demanding job of rearing a modern child come to be termed baby-sitting? When did caring for children become a 'labor of love,;' smothered under a blanket of sentimentality that hides its economic importance?”
Ann Crittenden

“A survey of 348 male managers at twenty Fortune 500 companies found that fathers from dual-career families put in an average of two fewer hours per week – or about 4 percent less – than men whose wives were at home. That was the only difference between the two groups of men. But the fathers with working wives, who presumably had a few more domestic responsibilities, earned almost 20 percent less.”
Ann Crittenden, The Price of Motherhood: Why the Most Important Job in the World Is Still the Least Valued



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