Phillip Cary





Phillip Cary

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Average rating: 4.10 · 325 ratings · 59 reviews · 16 distinct works · Similar authors
Good News for Anxious Chris...
3.91 of 5 stars 3.91 avg rating — 141 ratings — published 2010 — 4 editions
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Augustine: Philosopher and ...
4.09 of 5 stars 4.09 avg rating — 43 ratings — published 1997 — 2 editions
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History Of Christian Theology
4.44 of 5 stars 4.44 avg rating — 25 ratings — published 2008 — 4 editions
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Jonah
4.28 of 5 stars 4.28 avg rating — 18 ratings — published 2008 — 4 editions
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Philosophy and Religion in ...
4.43 of 5 stars 4.43 avg rating — 21 ratings — published 1999 — 3 editions
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Luther: Gospel, Law, and Re...
4.0 of 5 stars 4.00 avg rating — 19 ratings3 editions
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Augustine's Invention of th...
4.43 of 5 stars 4.43 avg rating — 7 ratings — published 1999 — 5 editions
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Outward Signs: The Powerles...
4.6 of 5 stars 4.60 avg rating — 5 ratings — published 2008 — 4 editions
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Inner Grace: Augustine in t...
4.2 of 5 stars 4.20 avg rating — 5 ratings — published 2008 — 3 editions
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Luther: Gospel, Law, and Re...
4.5 of 5 stars 4.50 avg rating — 2 ratings — published 2004
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“We typically misunderstand what's wrong about consumerism. It's not that it makes us love material things too much. To be a good consumer, you have to desire to get lots of things, but you must not love any of them too much once you have them. Consumerism needs children who do not stay attached to their toys for very long and learn to expect the next round of presents as soon as possible. When consumerism succeeds, our attachments are shallow, easily broken, so we can move on to the next thing we're supposed to get. Being a good consumer means desiring new things, not cherishing old ones. And the new things you're supposed to desire are not always material things. Spirituality is now a consumerist enterprise, too.”
Phillip Cary, Good News for Anxious Christians: Ten Practical Things You Don't Have to Do

“The importance of falling in love lies not in how it feels, but in what it perceives. And as always with our feelings, the key moral issue is how truthful the perception is... Falling in love is a sign that this might be someone with whom you could make a good marriage. Still, it's not enough, because the feeling is not always as perceptive as it should be... So falling in love is not the basis for a good marriage. It's not even a requirement. Marriage does not depend on falling in love; it depends on the promises you make to each other in your wedding vows and then spend a lifetime keeping. As many people have pointed out, you can't promise how you'll feel. But you can promise to cultivate a virtue, such as the virtue of love.”
Phillip Cary, Good News for Anxious Christians: Ten Practical Things You Don't Have to Do

“Every time we turn to Christ in faith it is like a moment of Sabbath, a little foretaste of eternal rest and glory. The gift of that moment lies not in what we do but what we receive. It is the holy time set aside to receive the greatest gift of God ever has to give, which is himself, in his own beloved Son.”
Phillip Cary, Good News for Anxious Christians: Ten Practical Things You Don't Have to Do



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