F.L. Lucas





F.L. Lucas

Author profile


born
January 01, 1894

died
January 01, 1967

gender
male

genre

About this author


Average rating: 3.99 · 68 ratings · 18 reviews · 22 distinct works · Similar authors
Style
4.13 of 5 stars 4.13 avg rating — 39 ratings — published 1955 — 4 editions
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How to Write Powerful Prose
3.0 of 5 stars 3.00 avg rating — 11 ratings — published 2012
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Style: The art of writing w...
4.43 of 5 stars 4.43 avg rating — 7 ratings — published 2012
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Tragedy: Serious Drama in R...
3.67 of 5 stars 3.67 avg rating — 3 ratings — published 1966 — 2 editions
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The Drama of Chekhov, Synge...
5.0 of 5 stars 5.00 avg rating — 1 rating — published 1976
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The English Agent: a Tale o...
4.0 of 5 stars 4.00 avg rating — 1 rating — published 1969
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The Drama of Ibsen and Stri...
4.0 of 5 stars 4.00 avg rating — 1 rating — published 1962
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The Art of Living: Four Eig...
4.0 of 5 stars 4.00 avg rating — 1 rating — published 1959
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Greek Tragedy and Comedy
4.0 of 5 stars 4.00 avg rating — 1 rating — published 1968
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Ariadne
0.0 of 5 stars 0.00 avg rating — 0 ratings — published 2013
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More books by F.L. Lucas…
“It is unlikely that many of us will be famous, or even remembered. But not less important than the brilliant few that lead a nation or a literature to fresh achievements, are the unknown many whose patient efforts keep the world from running backward; who guard and maintain the ancient values, even if they do not conquer new; whose inconspicuous triumph it is to pass on what they inherited from their fathers, unimpaired and undiminished, to their sons. Enough, for almost all of us, if we can hand on the torch, and not let it down; content to win the affection, if it may be, of a few who know us and to be forgotten when they in their turn have vanished. The destiny of mankind is not governed wholly by its “stars.”
F.L. Lucas

“Not less important than the brilliant hue that lead a nation or a literature to the fresh achievements, are the unknown many whose patient efforts keep the world from running backward; who guard and maintain the ancient values, even if they do not conquer new; whose inconspicuous triumph it is to pass on what they inherited from their fathers, unimpaired and undiminished, to their sons. Enough, for almost all of us, if we can hand on the torch, and not let it down; content to win the affection, if it may be, of a few who know us and to be forgotten when they in their turn have vanished. The destiny of mankind is not governed wholly by its stars.”
F.L. Lucas

“A writer should remember that about his muse there is a great deal of the Siren. He should view his mental offspring as relentlessly as a Spartan father - if it is not perfectly sound, let it be cast out.”
F.L. Lucas, Style