George Grant




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George Grant

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About this author

Dr. George Grant is an evangelical educator recognized by a Tennessee newspaper “Review Appeal” as the one who “lives and breathes” education.

Grant is known as a reformed scholar and evangelical activist who hopes to promote sound Christian doctrine, seeking honest answers to honest questions, developing true spirituality and experiencing the beauty of human relationships.

He founded Franklin Classical School, located in Franklin, Tennessee and the King’s Meadow Study Center, which seeks to help the modern church to develop a practical cultural expression of a Christian worldview in art, music, literature, politics, social research, community development and education.

Grant has also produced numerous writings of more than 60 works on the to
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“A quiet library in the early morning--there's just nothing quite as wonderful. All possible words and ideas are there, resting peacefully.” Haruki Murakami
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Published on March 18, 2015 05:00 • 10 views
Average rating: 3.99 · 1,249 ratings · 180 reviews · 89 distinct works · Similar authors
Carry a Big Stick: The Unco...
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Lament for a Nation
3.45 of 5 stars 3.45 avg rating — 87 ratings — published 1965 — 9 editions
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The Blood of the Moon: Unde...
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Killer Angel: A Short Biogr...
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Grand Illusions: The Legacy...
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The Patriot's Handbook: A C...
4.2 of 5 stars 4.20 avg rating — 44 ratings — published 1941 — 5 editions
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The Christian Almanac: A Di...
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4.59 of 5 stars 4.59 avg rating — 34 ratings — published 2000 — 3 editions
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The Micah Mandate
4.27 of 5 stars 4.27 avg rating — 33 ratings — published 1995 — 2 editions
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Shelf Life: How Books Have ...
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4.46 of 5 stars 4.46 avg rating — 26 ratings — published 1999
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The American Patriot's Hand...
4.62 of 5 stars 4.62 avg rating — 21 ratings — published 2009
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“A quiet library in the early morning--there's just nothing quite as wonderful. All possible words and ideas are there, resting peacefully.” Haruki... Read more of this blog post »
George Grant rated a book 3 of 5 stars
The Christian Renaissance by Albert Hyma
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The Brethren of the Common Life by Albert Hyma
The Brethren of the Common Life
by Albert Hyma
read in September, 2010
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George Grant rated a book 3 of 5 stars
Thomas Chalmers and the Godly Commonwealth in Scotland by Stewart J. Brown
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“When one contemplates the conquest of nature by technology one must remember that that conquest had to include our own bodies. Calvinism provided the determined and organised men and women who could rule the mastered world. The punishment they inflicted on non-human nature, they had first inflicted on themselves.”
George Grant, Technology and Empire

“As the American Patriots imagined it, a federal relationship would be a kind of confession of first principles or covenant that would allow states to bind themselves together substantially without entirely subsuming their sundry identities. The federal nature of the American Constitutional covenant would enable the nation to function as a republic – thus specifically avoiding the dangers of a pure democracy. Republics exercise governmental authority through mediating representatives under the rule of law. Pure democracies on the other hand exercise governmental authority through the imposition of the will of the majority without regard for the concerns of any minority – thus allowing law to be subject to the whims, fashions, and fancies of men. The Founders designed federal system of the United States so that the nation could be, as John Adams described it, a “government of law, not of men.” The Founders thus expressly and explicitly rejected the idea of a pure democracy, just as surely as totalitarian monarchy, because as James Madison declared “democracies have ever been spectacles of turbulence and contention; have ever been found incompatible with personal security, or the rights of property; and have in general been as short in their lives, as they have been violent in their deaths.” The rule of the majority does not always respect the rule of law, and is as turbulent as the caprices of political correctness or dictatorial autonomy. Indeed, history has proven all too often that democracy is particularly susceptible to the urges and impulses of mobocracy.”
George Grant, The Magdeburg Confession: 13th of April 1550 AD




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