Marybeth Lorbiecki





Marybeth Lorbiecki

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Average rating: 4.01 · 387 ratings · 171 reviews · 32 distinct works · Similar authors
Sister Anne's Hands
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4.27 of 5 stars 4.27 avg rating — 169 ratings — published 1998 — 6 editions
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Aldo Leopold: A Fierce Gree...
4.08 of 5 stars 4.08 avg rating — 51 ratings — published 1996 — 6 editions
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Escaping Titanic: A Young G...
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3.63 of 5 stars 3.63 avg rating — 49 ratings — published 2012 — 2 editions
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Jackie's Bat
3.85 of 5 stars 3.85 avg rating — 33 ratings — published 2006
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Paul Bunyan's Sweetheart
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3.93 of 5 stars 3.93 avg rating — 27 ratings — published 2007
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John Muir & Stickeen
3.38 of 5 stars 3.38 avg rating — 8 ratings — published 2004
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My Palace of Leaves in Sara...
3.83 of 5 stars 3.83 avg rating — 6 ratings — published 1997 — 2 editions
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Painting The Dakota: Seth E...
3.4 of 5 stars 3.40 avg rating — 5 ratings — published 2000
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Planet Patrol: A Kid's Acti...
4.0 of 5 stars 4.00 avg rating — 4 ratings — published 2005 — 3 editions
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Just One Flick of a Finger
2.8 of 5 stars 2.80 avg rating — 5 ratings — published 1996 — 2 editions
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“The nation’s forests were being cut faster than they could grow back. In the 1890s, while Aldo was growing up, the United States had begun to set aside forest reserves to protect the trees. Then, while Aldo was in high school, one of the country’s first forestry schools opened at Yale University. Aldo knew immediately what he wanted to do. If he could become a forester, he could get paid to work in the woods all day. How could a job get any better?”
Marybeth Lorbiecki, Things Natural, Wild, and Free: The Life of Aldo Leopold

“But it was Aldo’s pen that became his most forceful tool. He started a newsletter for rangers called the Carson Pine Cone. Aldo used it to “scatter seeds of knowledge, encouragement, and enthusiasm.” Most of the Pine Cone’s articles, poems, jokes, editorials, and drawings were Aldo’s own. His readers soon realized that the forest animals were as important to him as the trees. His goal was to bring back the “flavor of the wilds.”
Marybeth Lorbiecki, Things Natural, Wild, and Free: The Life of Aldo Leopold



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