Guy Davenport





Guy Davenport


Born
in Anderson, South Carolina, The United States
November 23, 1927

Died
January 04, 2005

Genre


Average rating: 4.28 · 4,716 ratings · 393 reviews · 69 distinct works · Similar authors
The Geography of the Imagin...

4.48 avg rating — 305 ratings — published 1981 — 6 editions
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7 Greeks

4.49 avg rating — 182 ratings — published 1995 — 3 editions
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Every Force Evolves a Form:...

4.52 avg rating — 99 ratings — published 1987 — 5 editions
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The Hunter Gracchus: And Ot...

4.21 avg rating — 81 ratings — published 1996 — 2 editions
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Da Vinci's Bicycle

4.25 avg rating — 71 ratings — published 1979 — 3 editions
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The Death of Picasso: New a...

4.47 avg rating — 60 ratings — published 2003 — 4 editions
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Eclogues: Eight Stories

4.29 avg rating — 51 ratings — published 1981 — 6 editions
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Tatlin!

4.48 avg rating — 48 ratings — published 1974 — 3 editions
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The Jules Verne Steam Ballo...

4.10 avg rating — 48 ratings — published 1987 — 5 editions
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Twelve Stories

4.23 avg rating — 35 ratings — published 1997
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More books by Guy Davenport…
“The poet is at the edge of our consciousness of the world, finding beyond the suspected nothingness which we imagine limits our perception another acre or so of being worth our venturing upon.”
Guy Davenport, The Geography of the Imagination: Forty Essays

“When Heraclitus said that everything passes steadily along, he was not inciting us to make the best of the moment, an idea unseemly to his placid mind, but to pay attention to the pace of things. Each has its own rhythm: the nap of a dog, the procession of the equinoxes, the dances of Lydia, the majestically slow beat of the drums at Dodona, the swift runners at Olympia.”
Guy Davenport, The Geography of the Imagination: Forty Essays

“Man was first a hunter, and an artist: his early vestiges tell us that alone. But he must always have dreamed, and recognized and guessed and supposed, all the skills of the imagination. Language itself is a continuously imaginative act. Rational discourse outside our familiar territory of Greek logic sounds to our ears like the wildest imagination. The Dogon, a people of West Africa, will tell you that a white fox named Ogo frequently weaves himself a hat of string bean hulls, puts it on his impudent head, and dances in the okra to insult and infuriate God Almighty, and that there's nothing we can do about it except abide him in faith and patience.

This is not folklore, or quaint custom, but as serious a matter to the Dogon as a filling station to us Americans. The imagination; that is, the way we shape and use the world, indeed the way we see the world, has geographical boundaries like islands, continents, and countries. These boundaries can be crossed. That Dogon fox and his impudent dance came to live with us, but in a different body, and to serve a different mode of the imagination. We call him Brer Rabbit.”
Guy Davenport, The Geography of the Imagination: Forty Essays

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