James C. Scott





James C. Scott


Born
December 02, 1936

Genre


received his bachelor's degree from Williams College and his MA and PhD (1967) from Yale. He taught at the University of Wisconsin–Madison until 1976, when he returned to Yale. Now Scott is the Sterling Professor of Political Science and Professor of Anthropology and is Director of the Agrarian Studies Program. He is a Fellow of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences, has held grants from the National Science Foundation, the National Endowment for the Humanities, and the Guggenheim Foundation, and has been a fellow at the Center for Advanced Study in the Behavioral Science, Science, Technology and Society Program at M.I.T., and the Institute for Advanced Study, Princeton.

His research concerns political economy, comparative agrarian socie
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Average rating: 4.1 · 4,271 ratings · 391 reviews · 24 distinct works · Similar authors
Seeing like a State: How Ce...

4.19 avg rating — 1,731 ratings — published 1998 — 9 editions
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The Art of Not Being Govern...

4.10 avg rating — 537 ratings — published 2009 — 8 editions
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Two Cheers for Anarchism: S...

3.90 avg rating — 486 ratings — published 2012 — 11 editions
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Domination and the Arts of ...

4.20 avg rating — 348 ratings — published 1990 — 7 editions
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Weapons of the Weak: Everyd...

4.18 avg rating — 315 ratings — published 1985 — 6 editions
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The Moral Economy of the Pe...

3.90 avg rating — 177 ratings — published 1976 — 6 editions
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Perlawanan Kaum Tani

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really liked it 4.00 avg rating — 11 ratings — published 1993
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Comparative Political Corru...

it was amazing 5.00 avg rating — 3 ratings — published 1972 — 2 editions
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Decoding Subaltern Politics...

really liked it 4.00 avg rating — 6 ratings — published 2012 — 8 editions
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Agrarian Studies: Synthetic...

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4.50 avg rating — 2 ratings — published 2001 — 5 editions
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“One day you will be called upon to break a big law in the name of justice and rationality. Everything will depend on it. You have to be ready. How are you going to prepare for that day when it really matters? You have to stay "in shape" so that when the big day comes you will be ready. What you need is "anarchist calisthenics." Every day or so break some trivial law that makes no sense, even if it’s only jaywalking. Use your own head to judge whether a law is just or reasonable. That way, you'll keep trim; and when the big day comes, you'll be ready.”
James C. Scott, Two Cheers for Anarchism: Six Easy Pieces on Autonomy, Dignity and Meaningful Work and Play

“Designed or planned social order is necessarily schematic; it always ignores essential features of any real, functioning social order. This truth is best illustrated in a work-to-rule strike, which turns on the fact that any production process depends on a host of informal practices and improvisations that could never be codified. By merely following the rules meticiously, the workforce can virtually halt production. In the same fashion, the simplified rules animating plans for, say, a city, a village or a collective farm were inadequate as a set of instructions for creating a functional social order, The formal scheme was parasitic on informal processes that, alone, it could not create or maintain.”
James C. Scott, Seeing like a State: How Certain Schemes to Improve the Human Condition Have Failed

“Not so very long ago, however, such self-governing peoples were the majority of humankind. Today, they are seen from the valley kingdoms as “our living ancestors,” “what we were like before we discovered wet-rice cultivation, Buddhism and civilization.” on the contrary, I argue that hill peoples are best understood as runaway, fugitive, maroon communities who have, over the course of two millennia, been fleeing the oppressions of state-making projects in the valleys — slavery, conscription, taxes, corvée labor, epidemics, and warfare.”
James C. Scott, The Art of Not Being Governed: An Anarchist History of Upland Southeast Asia



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