Larry M. Bartels





Larry M. Bartels



Average rating: 3.98 · 418 ratings · 52 reviews · 9 distinct works · Similar authors
Unequal Democracy: The Poli...

3.90 avg rating — 294 ratings — published 2008 — 8 editions
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Presidential Primaries and ...

3.63 avg rating — 8 ratings — published 1988 — 2 editions
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Mass Politics in Tough Time...

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4.50 avg rating — 2 ratings — published 2013 — 3 editions
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The New Gilded Age: From "U...

it was amazing 5.00 avg rating — 2 ratings — published 2012 — 3 editions
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Campaign Reform: Insights a...

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it was ok 2.00 avg rating — 1 rating — published 2000 — 4 editions
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The Annals of the American ...

0.00 avg rating — 0 ratings2 editions
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Democracy for Realists: Why...

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4.22 avg rating — 102 ratings4 editions
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Obama and America's Politic...

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3.43 avg rating — 7 ratings — published 2012 — 3 editions
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Mass Politics in Tough Time...

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0.00 avg rating — 0 ratings — published 2014 — 2 editions
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“On average, the real incomes of middle-class families have grown twice as fast under Democrats as they have under Republicans, while the real incomes of working poor families have grown six times as fast under Democrats as they have under Republicans. These substantial partisan differences persist even after allowing for differences in economic circumstances and historical trends beyond the control of individual presidents. They suggest that escalating inequality is not simply an inevitable economic trend—and that a great deal of economic inequality in the contemporary United States is specifically attributable to the policies and priorities of Republican presidents.”
Larry M. Bartels, Unequal Democracy: The Political Economy of the New Gilded Age

“as the economically advantaged groups unleash their greater resources in the political sphere. These groups lobby for tax loopholes, hire lawyers and accountants to maximize their benefit from tax laws, and then deduct the costs.”
Larry M. Bartels, Unequal Democracy: The Political Economy of the New Gilded Age

“Many ordinary Americans believe that “large differences in income are necessary for America’s prosperity,” as one standard survey question puts it.18 However, economists who have studied the relationship between inequality and economic growth have found little evidence that large disparities in income and wealth promote growth.19 There is not even much hard evidence in support of the commonsense notion that progressive tax rates retard growth by discouraging economic effort. Indeed, one liberal economist, Robert Frank, has written that “the lessons of experience are downright brutal” to the notion that higher taxes would stifle economic growth by causing wealthy people to work less or take fewer risks.”
Larry M. Bartels, Unequal Democracy: The Political Economy of the New Gilded Age



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