Patrik Ouředník





Patrik Ouředník


Born
in Prague , Czech Republic
April 23, 1957


The writer, translator and essayist Patrik Ouředník was born in Prague on 23 April 1957. After finishing his basic education he worked as an assistant in a bookshop, an assistant archivist, warehouseman, postman, labourer and ambulance man. From 1974 to 1976 he studied acting and directing at a People’s Art School in Prague. In 1985 he emigrated to France. He translates from French into Czech (Rabelais, Jarry, Queneau, Beckett, Vian and others) and from Czech into French (including Vančura, Hrabal, Holan, Skácel and Holub).

He is the author of twlve books, including fiction, essays, and poems. He is also the Czech translator of novels, short stories, and plays from such writers as François Rabelais, Alfred Jarry, Raymond Queneau, Samuel Bec
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Average rating: 4.08 · 1,125 ratings · 147 reviews · 20 distinct works · Similar authors
Europeana: A Brief History ...

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4.20 avg rating — 866 ratings — published 2001 — 28 editions
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Case Closed: A Novel

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3.43 avg rating — 113 ratings — published 2006 — 5 editions
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The Opportune Moment, 1855:...

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3.82 avg rating — 76 ratings — published 2006 — 9 editions
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Šmírbuch jazyka českého: Sl...

4.75 avg rating — 16 ratings — published 1992 — 2 editions
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Rok čtyřiadvacet

3.71 avg rating — 14 ratings — published 2002
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Oggi e dopodomani. Discorsi...

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really liked it 4.00 avg rating — 4 ratings — published 2012 — 2 editions
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Klíč je ve výčepu

really liked it 4.00 avg rating — 3 ratings — published 2000
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Dnes a pozítří

3.67 avg rating — 3 ratings — published 2012
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Utopus to byl, kdo učinil m...

3.67 avg rating — 3 ratings — published 2010
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Aniž jest co nového pod slu...

4.50 avg rating — 2 ratings — published 1994 — 2 editions
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“Some historians subsequently said that the twentieth century actually started in 1914, when war broke out, because it was first war in history in which so many countries took part, in which so many people died and in which airships and airplanes flew and bombarded the rear and towns and civilians, and submarines sunk ships and artillery could lob shells ten or twelve kilometers. And the Germans invented gas and the English invented tanks and scientists discovered isotopes and general theory of relativity, according to which nothing was metaphysical, but relative.And when Senegalese fusiliers first saw an airplane they thought it was a tame bird and one of the Senegalese soldiers cut a lump of flesh from a dead horse and threw it as far as he could in order to lure it away. And airships and airplanes flew through the sky and the horses were terribly frightened. And writers and poets endeavored to find new ways of expressing it best and in 1916 they invented Dadaism because everything seemed crazy to them. And in Russia they invented a revolution. And the soldiers wore around their neck or wrist a tag with their name and the number of their regiment to indicate who was who, and where to send a telegram of condolences, but if the explosion tore off their head or arm and the tag was lost, the military command would announce that they were unknown soldiers, and in most capital cities they instituted an eternal flame lest they be forgotten, because fire preserves the memory of something long past. And the fallen French measured 2,681 kilometers, the fallen English 1,547 kilometers, and the fallen Germans, 3,010 kilometers, taking the average legth of a corpse as 172 centimeters. And a total of 15, 508 kilometers of soldiers fell worldwide. And in 1918 an influenza known as Spanish Flu spread throughout the world killing over twenty million people. Pacifists and anti-militarists subsequently said that these had also been victims of the war because the soldiers and civilian populations lived in poor conditions of hygiene, but epidemiologists said that the disease killed more people in countries where there was no war, such as Oceania, India or the United States, and the Anarchists said that it was a good thing because the world was corrupt and heading for destruction.”
Patrik Ouředník, Europeana: A Brief History of the Twentieth Century

“Historians concluded that in the twentieth century about sixty genocides had occurred in the world, but not all of them entered historical memory. Historians said that historical memory was not part of history and memory was shifted from the historical to the psychological sphere, and this instituted a new mode of memory whereby it was no longer a question of memory of events but memory of memory.”
Patrik Ouředník, Europeana: A Brief History of the Twentieth Century

“Anthropologically speaking, the attitude of women toward chaos is preventative: they clean so as not to have to. The logic may be debatable, but it does get results. On the other hand, the attitude of men is curative: they clean only when they feel directly threatened by chaos.”
Patrik Ouředník, Case Closed: A Novel



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