Edmund Spenser





Edmund Spenser

Author profile


born
London, England, The United Kingdom
died
January 13, 1599

gender
male

genre


About this author

Edmund Spenser (c. 1552 – 13 January 1599) was an important English poet and Poet Laureate best known for The Faerie Queene, an epic poem celebrating, through fantastical allegory, the Tudor dynasty and Elizabeth I.

Though he is recognized as one of the premier craftsmen of Modern English verse in its infancy, Spenser is also a controversial figure due to his zeal for the destruction of Irish culture and colonisation of Ireland.


Average rating: 3.56 · 11,282 ratings · 362 reviews · 107 distinct works · Similar authors
The Faerie Queene
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3.51 of 5 stars 3.51 avg rating — 9,817 ratings — published 1590 — 57 editions
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Edmund Spenser's Poetry
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3.71 of 5 stars 3.71 avg rating — 289 ratings — published 1887 — 20 editions
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The Faerie Queene, Book One
by
3.71 of 5 stars 3.71 avg rating — 366 ratings — published 1960 — 23 editions
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Fierce Wars and Faithful Lo...
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4.34 of 5 stars 4.34 avg rating — 97 ratings — published 1999 — 2 editions
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The Faerie Queene, Book Two
3.89 of 5 stars 3.89 avg rating — 70 ratings — published 1919 — 13 editions
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The Shorter Poems
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4.1 of 5 stars 4.10 avg rating — 84 ratings — published 1989 — 5 editions
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The Faerie Queene, Books Th...
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4.11 of 5 stars 4.11 avg rating — 55 ratings — published 2006 — 2 editions
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Amoretti and Epithalamion
3.84 of 5 stars 3.84 avg rating — 57 ratings — published 1595 — 6 editions
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Amoretti
3.9 of 5 stars 3.90 avg rating — 51 ratings — published 2008 — 6 editions
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The Works of Edmund Spenser
4.21 of 5 stars 4.21 avg rating — 33 ratings — published 1599 — 34 editions
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More books by Edmund Spenser…
“For there is nothing lost, that may be found, if sought.”
Edmund Spenser, The Faerie Queene

“For whatsoever from one place doth fall,
Is with the tide unto an other brought:
For there is nothing lost, that may be found, if sought.”
Edmund Spenser, The Faerie Queene

“So furiously each other did assayle,
As if their soules they would attonce haue rent
Out of their brests, that streames of bloud did rayle
Adowne, as if their springes of life were spent;
That all the ground with purple bloud was sprent,
And all their armours staynd with bloudie gore,
Yet scarcely once to breath would they relent,
So mortall was their malice and so sore,
Become of fayned friendship which they vow'd afore.”
Edmund Spenser, The Faerie Queene, Books Three and Four

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