Cheryl Benard





Cheryl Benard

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Average rating: 3.62 · 335 ratings · 81 reviews · 30 distinct works · Similar authors
Veiled Courage: Inside the ...
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3.98 of 5 stars 3.98 avg rating — 94 ratings — published 2002 — 7 editions
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Moghul Buffet
3.51 of 5 stars 3.51 avg rating — 73 ratings — published 1998 — 3 editions
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Turning On The Girls
3.43 of 5 stars 3.43 avg rating — 79 ratings — published 2001 — 3 editions
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الإسلام الديمقراطي المدني: ...
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3.45 of 5 stars 3.45 avg rating — 66 ratings — published 2003 — 4 editions
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Civil Democratic Islam
3.67 of 5 stars 3.67 avg rating — 3 ratings
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Women and Nation-Building
3.67 of 5 stars 3.67 avg rating — 3 ratings — published 2008 — 2 editions
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Let's kill Barbie!
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5.0 of 5 stars 5.00 avg rating — 2 ratings — published 1997
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Vor unseren Augen: der Krie...
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3.5 of 5 stars 3.50 avg rating — 2 ratings — published 1993
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Grenzen des Geschlechts: An...
5.0 of 5 stars 5.00 avg rating — 1 rating — published 1990
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The Battle Behind the Wire:...
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3.0 of 5 stars 3.00 avg rating — 1 rating — published 2011 — 3 editions
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“I have the impression that our children are much more excited about going to school than children in other countries are. They think of it as a special privilege. Going to school, being with other children, getting books and pencils - all of that is like a dream for them.”
Cheryl Benard, Veiled Courage: Inside the Afghan Women's Resistance

“The women in that ward were simple, ordinary refugee women. They came from villages or very small towns. Even before becoming refugees, they had been poor. They had no education. They had no notion of an outside world where life might be different. They were being treated for various ailments, but in the end, their gender was their ailment.

In the first bed, a skinny fourteen-year-old girl lay rolled into her sheets in a state of almost catatonic unresponsiveness, eyes closed, not speaking even in reply to the doctor’s gentle greeting. Her family had brought her to be treated for mental illness, the doctor explained with regret. They had recently married her to a man in his seventies, a wealthy and influential personage by their standards. In their version of things, something had started mysteriously to go wrong with her mind as soon as the marriage was agreed upon – a case of demon possession, her family supposed. When, after repeated beatings, she still failed to cooperate gracefully with her new husband’s sexual demands, he had angrily returned her to her family and ordered them to fix this problem.

They had taken the girl to a mullah, who had tried to expel the demon through prayers and by writing Quranic passages on little pieces of paper that had to be dissolved in water and then drunk, but this had brought no improvement, so the mullah had abandoned his diagnosis of demon possession and decided that the girl was sick. The family had brought her to the clinic, to be treated for insanity.”
Cheryl Benard, Veiled Courage: Inside the Afghan Women's Resistance



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