J.K. Rowling

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J.K. Rowling


Born
in Yate, South Gloucestershire, England, The United Kingdom
July 31, 1965

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Influences


See also: Robert Galbraith
Although she writes under the pen name J.K. Rowling, pronounced like rolling, her name when her first Harry Potter book was published was simply Joanne Rowling. Anticipating that the target audience of young boys might not want to read a book written by a woman, her publishers demanded that she use two initials, rather than her full name. As she had no middle name, she chose K as the second initial of her pen name, from her paternal grandmother Kathleen Ada Bulgen Rowling. She calls herself Jo and has said, "No one ever called me 'Joanne' when I was young, unless they were angry." Following her marriage, she has sometimes used the name Joanne Murray when conducting personal business. During the Leveson Inquiry she
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Average rating: 4.41 · 14,360,329 ratings · 297,904 reviews · 109 distinct works · Similar authors
Harry Potter and the Sorcer...

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4.41 avg rating — 3,703,283 ratings — published 1997 — 414 editions
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Harry Potter and the Prison...

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4.50 avg rating — 1,616,876 ratings — published 1999 — 297 editions
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Harry Potter and the Deathl...

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4.59 avg rating — 1,527,894 ratings — published 2007 — 232 editions
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Harry Potter and the Order ...

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4.44 avg rating — 1,559,448 ratings — published 2003 — 246 editions
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Harry Potter and the Goblet...

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4.50 avg rating — 1,544,559 ratings — published 2000 — 273 editions
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Harry Potter and the Chambe...

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4.33 avg rating — 1,550,777 ratings — published 1998 — 301 editions
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Harry Potter and the Half-B...

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4.51 avg rating — 1,486,822 ratings — published 2005 — 229 editions
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The Tales of Beedle the Bard

3.99 avg rating — 224,585 ratings — published 2008 — 80 editions
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Harry Potter Boxset (Harry ...

4.73 avg rating — 174,641 ratings — published 1998 — 47 editions
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The Casual Vacancy

3.26 avg rating — 216,331 ratings — published 2012 — 133 editions
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More books by J.K. Rowling…
Harry Potter: Prequel Harry Potter and the Sorcer... Harry Potter and the Chambe... Harry Potter and the Prison... Harry Potter and the Goblet... Harry Potter and the Order ... Harry Potter and the Half-B...
Harry Potter (9 books)
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4.44 avg rating — 13,751,824 ratings

The Tales of Beedle the Bard Fantastic Beasts and Where ... Quidditch Through the Ages
Hogwarts Library (3 books)
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3.96 avg rating — 488,995 ratings

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“If you want to know what a man's like, take a good look at how he treats his inferiors, not his equals.”
J.K. Rowling, Harry Potter and the Goblet of Fire

“It is our choices, Harry, that show what we truly are, far more than our abilities.”
J.K. Rowling, Harry Potter and the Chamber of Secrets

“It does not do to dwell on dreams and forget to live.”
J.K. Rowling, Harry Potter and the Sorcerer's Stone

Polls

The Casual Vacancy by J.K. Rowling
In celebration of the paperback release of The Casual Vacancy, J.K. Rowling will answer one winning question about the book from Goodreads members! Fans submitted tons of questions, and here is our top five! Vote for your favorite, and J.K. Rowling will answer the winning question!


The most haunting idea I was left with came from your gritty exposure of the ugliness and weakness of human nature (it's far too easy, after all, to write about the potential and existent beauty of our natures). How important is it to you that this kind of real-ness exists in your characters? And if your hope was to showcase this, do you have a goal in mind, in terms of how we can rise above or grow from humanity at its worst? (submitted by Goodreads member Anne Gunden)
 
  751 votes, 26.2%

I love the way you get inside the heads of the characters in The Casual Vacancy and reveal some of their darkest thoughts, yet keep the reader fully invested in what happens to them. How do you reveal so many negative sides of a character and still keep the reader glued to the pages desperate to know their fate? (submitted by Goodreads member Kristy Madden)
 
  697 votes, 24.4%

The Casual Vacancy is a Dickens for the 21st century. You held up a mirror to the world I live in. How important is it to you that your writing has a strong moral message? Can a novel change society? (submitted by Goodreads member Rebecca Hanley)
 
  567 votes, 19.8%

The novel's characters are divided into two distinct communities. I found the collective attitudes and world views of both communities to be very realistic, and I find that I am most definitely more sympathetic to one community over the other. However, I cannot know if I am applying my own personal experiences and biases into my analysis. How objective and neutral did you try to be in developing your characters, and how much of your own personal experiences did you allow to influence your portrayal of the two communities? (submitted by Goodreads member Tan)
 
  507 votes, 17.7%

I found the psychology of [the character] Fats fascinating - it actually reminded me of Alex's mindset in A Clockwork Orange in that it was profoundly philosophical and yet fatally flawed. How did you devise his theory of the authentic and inauthentic? (submitted by Goodreads member Helena Sheffield)
 
  339 votes, 11.8%

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