Scott Berkun




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Scott Berkun

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July 2013


About this author

Scott Berkun is the author of four popular books, Making Things Happen, The Myths of Innovation, Confessions of a Public Speaker and Mindfire: Big Ideas for Curious Minds. His work as a writer and speaker have appeared in the The Washington Post, the New York Times, Wired, the Economist, Fast Company, Forbes, CNBC, MSNBC, CNN, National Public Radio and other media. His many popular essays and entertaining lectures can be found for free on his blog at http://www.scottberkun.com, and he tweets at https://twitter.com/berkun.


More than 350 of you voted for the previous round of cover designs. Thanks for your feedback dearest readers. A few weeks have passed since then and I’m back today with what are likely the final cover concepts: only two to choose from. How exciting!


Important: If you missed the kickstarter campaign, you canjoin this listto be first to be notified when the book is on sale, and receive early givea...

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Published on July 23, 2014 15:00 • 2 views
Average rating: 3.87 · 4,705 ratings · 415 reviews · 9 distinct works · Similar authors
Making Things Happen: Maste...
3.99 of 5 stars 3.99 avg rating — 1,557 ratings — published 2001 — 8 editions
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Confessions of a Public Spe...
3.91 of 5 stars 3.91 avg rating — 1,326 ratings — published 2009 — 24 editions
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The Myths of Innovation
3.75 of 5 stars 3.75 avg rating — 1,092 ratings — published 2007 — 14 editions
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The Year Without Pants: Wor...
3.86 of 5 stars 3.86 avg rating — 484 ratings — published 2013 — 7 editions
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The Art of Project Management
3.77 of 5 stars 3.77 avg rating — 304 ratings — published 2005 — 5 editions
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Mindfire: Big Ideas for Cur...
3.8 of 5 stars 3.80 avg rating — 298 ratings — published 2011 — 4 editions
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Die Kunst des IT-Projektman...
3.5 of 5 stars 3.50 avg rating — 4 ratings — published 2006 — 5 editions
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Paburikku Supīkā No Kokuhak...
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3.33 of 5 stars 3.33 avg rating — 3 ratings — published 2010
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Using the Internet with You...
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0.0 of 5 stars 0.00 avg rating — 0 ratings — published 1995
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More books by Scott Berkun…

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Scott Berkun wrote a new blog post
More than 350 of you voted for the previous round of cover designs. Thanks for your feedback dearest readers. A few weeks have passed since then an... Read more of this blog post »
The Year Without Pants by Scott Berkun
" A great book on what it is to work remotely and/or lead a geographically distributed team. Scott's first person narrative makes this an easy read and makes you feel as though this is a personal conversation over dinner with the author. "
The Year Without Pants by Scott Berkun
" If sometimes you wonder whether everything possible hasn't already been written about startups, business, software startups, software businesses and so on (ad nauseum), you wouldn't be alone.

Certainly, the industry which examines this seems pretty... " Read more of this review »
The Year Without Pants by Scott Berkun
" I'm pretty stingy with five star reviews. To get five stars a book needs to be something that I think I will come back to. It has to have the potential to become an old friend. The Year Without Pants fits that perfectly. In the book Scott Berkun t... " Read more of this review »
Scott Berkun rated a book 4 of 5 stars
Liar's Poker by Michael Lewis
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More of Scott's books…
“People who truly have control over time always have some in their pocket to give to someone in need. A sense of priorities drives their use of time and it can shift away from the ordinary work that’s easy to justify, in favor of the more ethereal, deeper things that are harder to justify. They protect their time from trivia and idiocy; these people are time rich. They provide themselves with a surplus of time. They might seem to idle, or relax more often than the rest, but that just might be a sign of their mastery, not their incompetence.”
Scott Berkun, Mindfire

“The Greeks were so committed to ideas as supernatural forces that they created an entire group of goddesses (not one but nine) to represent creative power; the opening lines of both The Iliad and The Odyssey begin with calls to them. These nine goddesses, or muses, were the recipients of prayers from writers, engineers, and musicians. Even the great minds of the time, like Socrates and Plato, built shrines and visited temples dedicated to their particular muse (or muses, for those who hedged their bets). Right now, under our very secular noses, we honor these beliefs in our language, as the etymology of words like museum ("place of the muses") and music ("art of the muses") come from the Greek heritage of ideas as superhuman forces.”
Scott Berkun, The Myths of Innovation

“I believe anyone can teach anyone anything. But I mean this in a specific sense. If you have two dedicated, reasonably intelligent people, one interested in teaching and the other wanting to learn, something great can happen. Think master and apprentice, mentor and protégé. For learning, small numbers win. The success of this one-on-one method is proven throughout history; many so-called prodigies were tutored by a parent or family friend (Einstein, Picasso, and Mozart all qualify). Yes, they had amazing, inherent talent, but they were still privately taught by people invested in their learning. Teaching is intimacy of the mind, and you can’t achieve that if you must work in large numbers.”
Scott Berkun, Confessions of a Public Speaker

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