William H. Willimon





William H. Willimon


Born
in Greenville, SC, The United States
May 15, 1946

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William Henry Willimon is a bishop in the United Methodist Church who currently serves in North Alabama. One of America's best known preachers, he formerly served as Dean of the Chapel at Duke University and taught at Duke Divinity School.

William H. Willimon isn't a Goodreads Author (yet), but he does have a blog, so here are some recent posts imported from his feed.
In a spirit of itineracy, the Bishop's blog is moving to a new web page. You can now find Bishop Willimon's blogs, articles, videos, and podcasts at his own personal site:

www.willwillimon.com

On the right hand side of the page, there is a button to subscribe via email. Click the "follow" button and input your email to receive updates about new posts in your email inbox.




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Published on June 15, 2012 11:29 • 26 views
Average rating: 4.01 · 4,352 ratings · 410 reviews · 132 distinct works · Similar authors
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Calling & Character: Virtue...

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Peculiar Speech: Preaching ...

4.12 avg rating — 58 ratings — published 1992
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Remember Who You Are

by
4.19 avg rating — 47 ratings — published 1980 — 2 editions
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Who Will Be Saved?

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Sinning Like a Christian: A...

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Why Jesus?

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United Methodist Beliefs: A...

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Fear of the Other: No Fear ...

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Acts: Interpretation: A Bib...

3.81 avg rating — 48 ratings — published 1988 — 5 editions
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“Despite our earnest efforts, we couldn't climb all the way up to God. So what did God do? In an amazing act of condescension, on Good Friday, God climbed down to us, became one with us. The story of divine condescension begins on Christmas and ends on Good Friday. We thought, if there is to be business between us and God, we must somehow get up to God. Then God came down, down to the level of the cross, all the way down to the depths of hell. He who knew not sin took on our sin so that we might be free of it. God still stoops, in your life and mine, condescends. “Are you able to drink the cup that I am to drink?” he asked his disciples, before his way up Golgotha. Our answer is an obvious, “No!” His cup is not only the cup of crucifixion and death, it is the bloody, bloody cup that one must drink if one is going to get mixed up in us. Any God who would wander into the human condition, any God who has this thirst to pursue us, had better not be too put off by pain, for that's the way we tend to treat our saviors. Any God who tries to love us had better be ready to die for it. As Chesterton writes, “Any man who preaches real love is bound to beget hate … Real love has always ended in bloodshed.”
William H. Willimon, Thank God It's Friday: Encountering the Seven Last Words from the Cross

“Jesus didn't die as a frustrated failed revolutionary. His death was the revolution.”
William H. Willimon

“. . . when we take upon ourselves his yoke of obedience, his yoke is easy, his burden is light (Matt. 11:28-30). When is a burden light? It is when we find our burdensome lives caught up, elevated, borne aloft by something greater than our lives. Mission gives meaning. Jesus does not come to us to relieve us of all yokes or burdens; rather, he comes offering us a yoke worth wearing, a burden worth bearing. It is a great gift not to have to make your life mean something, to have your life given significance by the Lord whose cross, when taken up, takes us up as well. 119-120”
William H. Willimon, Calling & Character: Virtues Of The Ordained Life

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Challenge: 50 Books: JB's 2011 Reads 22 113 Dec 28, 2011 03:28PM  


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