Philippa Perry





Philippa Perry


Born
Warrington, Cheshire
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Philippa Perry, author of How to Stay Sane, is a psychotherapist and writer who has written pieces for The Guardian, The Observer, Time Out, and Healthy Living magazine and has a column in Psychologies Magazine. In 2010, she wrote the graphic novel Couch Fiction, in an attempt to demystify psychotherapy. She lives in London and Sussex with her husband, the artist Grayson Perry, and enjoys gardening, cooking, parties, walking, tweeting, and watching telly.

http://us.macmillan.com/author/philip...

Average rating: 3.72 · 1,396 ratings · 150 reviews · 5 distinct works · Similar authors
How to Stay Sane

3.71 avg rating — 1,157 ratings — published 2012 — 14 editions
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Couch Fiction: A Graphic Ta...

3.77 avg rating — 242 ratings — published 2010 — 3 editions
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Tabitha Miggins, Ship's Cat

0.00 avg rating — 0 ratings — published 2013
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Mega Machines (Young Telegr...

0.00 avg rating — 0 ratings — published 1999
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La coscienza di James: Diar...

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2.50 avg rating — 2 ratings — published 2014
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“As we get older it is our short term memory that fades rather than our long term memory. Perhaps we have evolved like this so that we are able to tell the younger generation about the stories and experiences that have formed us which may be important to subsequent generations if they are to thrive.

I worry though, about what might happen to our minds if most of the stories we hear are about greed, war, and atrocity”
Philippa Perry, How to Stay Sane

“It may help to remember when you receive a complaint that it is only nominally about you; it is really information about the person making the complaint.”
Philippa Perry, How to Stay Sane

“You may find that you have been telling yourself that practicing optimism is a risk, as though, somehow, a positive attitude will invite disaster and so if you practice optimism it may increase your feelings of vulnerability. The trick is to increase your tolerance for vulnerable feelings, rather than avoid them altogether.

[…]

Optimism does not mean continual happiness, glazed eyes and a fixed grin. When I talk about the desirability of optimism I do not mean that we should delude ourselves about reality. But practicing optimism does mean focusing more on the positive fall-out of an event than on the negative. … I am not advocating the kind of optimism that means you blow all your savings on a horse running at a hundred to one; I am talking about being optimistic enough to sow some seeds in the hope that some of them will germinate and grow into flowers.”
Philippa Perry, How to Stay Sane



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