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Yasunari Kawabata quotes (showing 1-30 of 81)

“As he caught his footing, his head fell back, and the Milky Way flowed down inside him with a roar.”
Yasunari Kawabata, Snow Country
“Cosmic time is the same for everyone, but human time differs with each person. Time flows in the same way for all human beings; every human being flows through time in a different way.”
Yasunari Kawabata
“Put your soul in the palm of my hand for me to look at, like a crystal jewel. I'll sketch it in words...”
Yasunari Kawabata
“The true joy of a moonlit night is something we no longer understand. Only the men of old, when there were no lights, could understand the true joy of a moonlit night.”
Yasunari Kawabata, Palm-of-the-Hand Stories
“I suppose even a woman's hatred is a kind of love.”
Yasunari Kawabata, Beauty and Sadness
“Does pain go away and leave no trace, then?’
‘You sometimes even feel sentimental for it.”
Yasunari Kawabata, Thousand Cranes
“But even more than her diary, Shimamura was surprised at her statement that she had carefully cataloged every novel and short story she had read since she was fifteen or sixteen. The record already filled ten notebooks.
"You write down your criticisms, do you?"
"I could never do anything like that. I just write down the author and the characters and how they are related to each other. That is about all."
"But what good does it do?"
"None at all."
"A waste of effort."
"A complete waste of effort," she answered brightly, as though the admission meant little to her. She gazed solemnly at Shimamura, however.
A complete waste of effort. For some reason Shimamura wanted to stress the point. But, drawn to her at that moment, he felt a quiet like the voice of the rain flow over him. He knew well enough that for her it was in fact no waste of effort, but somehow the final determination that it had the effect of distilling and purifying the woman's existence.”
Yasunari Kawabata, Snow Country
“I wonder what the retirement age is in the novel business.

The day you die.”
Yasunari Kawabata, Beauty and Sadness
“Time passed. But time flows in many streams. Like a river, an inner stream of time will flow rapidly at some places and sluggishly at others, or perhaps even stand hopelessly stagnant. Cosmic time is the same for everyone, but human time differs with each person. Time flows in the same way for all human beings; every human being flows through time in a different way.”
Yasunari Kawabata, Beauty and Sadness
“Now, even more than the evening before, he could think of no one with whom to compare her. She had become absolute, beyond comparison. She had become decision and fate.”
Yasunari Kawabata, Thousand Cranes
“A poetess who had died young of cancer had said in one of her poems that for her, on sleepless nights, 'the night offers toads and black dogs and corpses of the drowned.”
Yasunari Kawabata, House of the Sleeping Beauties and Other Stories
“Lunatics have no age. If we were crazy, you and I, we might be a great deal younger.”
Yasunari Kawabata
“In the depths of the mirror the evening landscape moved by, the mirror and the reflected figures like motion pictures superimposed one on the other. The figures and the background were unrelated, and yet the figures, transparent and intangible, and the background, dim in the gathering darkness, melted into a sort of symbolic world not of this world. Particularly when a light out in the mountains shone in the centre of the girl's face, Shimamura felt his chest rise at the inexpressible beauty of it.”
Yasunari Kawabata, Snow Country
“The road was frozen. The village lay quiet under the cold sky. Komako hitched up the skirt of her kimono and tucked it into her obi. The moon shone like a blade frozen in blue ice.”
Yasunari Kawabata, Snow Country
“They were words that came out of nothing, but they seemed to him somehow significant. He muttered them over again.”
Yasunari Kawabata, The Sound of the Mountain
“Because you cannot see him, God is everywhere.”
Yasunari Kawabata
“But, drawn to her at that moment, he felt a quiet like the voice of the rain flow over him. He knew well enough that for her it was in fact no waste of effort, but somehow the final determination that it was had the effect of distilling and purifying the woman's existence.”
Yasunari Kawabata, Snow Country
“The baby understands that its mother loves it. [...] Words have their origin in baby talk, so words have their origin in love.”
Yasunari Kawabata, First Snow on Fuji
“It's remarkable how we go on year after year, doing the same old things. We get tired and bored, and ask when they'll come for us”
Yasunari Kawabata, The Sound of the Mountain
“A child walked by, rolling a metal hoop that made a sound of autumn.”
Yasunari Kawabata, Palm-of-the-Hand Stories
“Long accustomed to a life of self-indulgent solitude, he began to yearn for the beauty of giving himself to others. The nobility of the word 'sacrifice' became clear to him. He took satisfaction in the feeling of his own littleness as a single seed whose purpose was to carry forward from the past into the future the life of the species called humanity. He even sympathized with the thought that the human species, together with the various kinds of minerals and plants, was no more than a small pillar that helped support a single vast organism adrift in the cosmos-- and with the thought that it was no more precious than the other animals and plants.”
Yasunari Kawabata, Palm-of-the-Hand Stories
“The woman was silent, her eyes on the floor. Shimamura had come to a point where he knew he was only parading his masculine shamelessness, and yet it seemed likely enough that the woman was familiar with the failing and need not be shocked by it. He looked at her. Perhaps it was the rich lashes of the downcast eyes that made her face seem warm and sensuous. She shook her head very slightly, and again a faint blush spread over her face.”
Yasunari Kawabata, Snow Country
“It was a stern night landscape. The sound of the freezing of snow over the land seemed to roar deep into the earth. There was no moon. The stars, almost too many of them to be true, came forward so brightly that it was as if they were falling with the swiftness of the void. As the stars came nearer, the sky retreated deeper and deeper into the night clolour. The layers of the Border Range, indistinguishable one from another, cast their heaviness at the skirt of the starry sky in a blackness grave and somber enough to communicate their mass. The whole of the night scene came together in a clear, tranquil harmony.”
Yasunari Kawabata, Snow Country
“En el mundo había gente tan parecida entre sí que se los podría tomar por padres e hijos. Pero difícilmente existieran muchos en el mundo. Tal vez hubiera un solo hombre que pudiera corresponderse con una muchacha y una sola joven que combinara con un hombre. Solo uno para algún otro; y tal vez en todo el mundo una sola pareja posible. Viven como extraños, sin suponer ningún tipo de lazo entre ellos y hasta ignorantes de la existencia del otro.
Por casualidad suben a un mismo tren, se reúnen por primera vez y probablemente nunca vuelvan a encontrarse. Treinta minutos en el curso de toda una vida. Se separan sin decirse una palabra. Habiendo estado sentados uno al lado del otro, sin mirarse, sin darse cuenta del parecido, se alejan siendo parte de un milagro del que no tomaron conciencia.
Y el único admirado por la rareza de todo eso es un extraño que se pregunta si, al ser un accidental testigo, no estará participando de un milagro.”
Yasunari Kawabata, The Sound of the Mountain
“The labor into which a heart has poured its whole love--where will it have its say, to excite and inspire, and when?”
Yasunari Kawabata
“El tiempo pasó. Pero el tiempo se divide en muchas corrientes. Como en un rio, hay una corriente central rapida en algunos sectores y lenta, hasta inmóvil, en otros. El tiempo cósmico es igual para todos, pero el tiempo humano difiere con cada persona. El tiempo corre de la misma manera para todos los seres humanos; pero todo ser humano flota de distinta manera en el tiempo.”
Yasunari Kawabata
“Perhaps they don't realize where they were, so they went on living.”
Yasunari Kawabata, The Old Capital
“People have separated from each other with walls of concrete that blocked the roads to connection and love. and Nature has been defeated in the name of development.”
Yasunari Kawabata
“Was this the bright vastness the poet Bashō saw when he wrote of the Milky Way arched over a stormy sea?”
Yasunari Kawabata, Snow Country
“Manusia yang tak mau gelisah, sesungguhnya dia telah mati”
Yasunari Kawabata

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